Invasive Species

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World of species right here on the Hudson

If you want to see plants and animals from around the world, you don’t have to go to the zoo or botanical garden — just visit the Hudson River. When you get out of your car, you see common reed (phragmites), false-indigo and purple loosestrife growing along the edges of the parking lot.

Phragmites

Scientific name: Phragmites australis
Common names:  common reed
Form: perennial grass
Native status: invasive
Origin: Europe

Tatarian (Bush) honeysuckle

Scientific name: Lonicera tatarica
Common names:  bush honeysuckle
Form: perennial shrub
Native status: invasive
Origin: Asia

Water chestnut

Scientific name: Trapa natans
Common names:  water nut, water caltrop 
Form: perennial
Native status: invasive
Origin: Eurasia

Related Projects

Effects of Invasive Hemlock Woolly Adelgid on Northeastern Forests

Hemlock is a "foundation" tree species in eastern forests and its presence defines the properties of a unique ecosystem that is presently declining due to the introduction and spread of an invasive insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid.

Effects of Gypsy Moth on Nitrogen Cycling

The gypsy moth was introduced to North America from Europe in 1869 and has become a major defoliator of eastern hardwood forests.

Ecosystem Effects of Exotic Forest Pests

Over the last century, forests of the eastern U.S. have been plagued by a series of devastating introductions of exotic pests.

zebra mussel

Zebra Mussels and the Hudson River

Zebra mussels appeared in the Hudson in 1991 and fundamentally transformed the ecosystem. The zebra mussel invasion is linked to losses of native mussels and changes in the fish community.

Effects of Beech Bark Disease on Catskill forests

This project is focused on the consequences of the invasion of the beech bark disease (BBD) in northern hardwood forests, which dominate the uplands of the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada.

Exotic Earthworms & Northern Temperate Forests

Earthworms effect microbial nitrogen cycling and ecosystem nitrogen retention. Earthworm invasion of north temperate forests will have large consequences for nutrient retention and uptake in these ecosystems.

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

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