Education

Cary Institute students present their findings

On August 15 the 12 students in this year’s Cary Institute’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program presented the results of the research they conducted during the ten weeks they spent at the Institute this summer.

Hudson Data Jam

For more than thirty years, our researchers have been studying the Hudson River and its watershed, analyzing everything from water chemistry to invasive species. That vast data set was the inspiration for a new offering by our Education Program.

Choose a summer camp

Warmer weather is finally here, and for many parents and their children, this means the time to choose a summer camp is fast approaching. The Hudson Valley has a large selection of camps, from day camps to sleep-away camps, covering everything from theater to farming.

Cary Institute debuts student competition with a focus on Hudson River science and creativity

Cary Institute educators are challenging middle school and high school students to creatively bring  long-term river data to life in the Hudson Data Jam, a new competition that melds science and creativity.

Teens get involved with nature

Michael Meaden is a hands-on, outdoor teen. As a youngster, he enjoyed outdoor youth camps at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook. But then the 14-year-old outgrew the camps. Fortunately, last year a new teen program was added to the youth camps: Eco-Investigator, for rising eighth- through 10th-graders.

Cary Institute, other experts aim to help public comprehend science

Understanding the natural world is important — especially to scientists. But they'll be the first to say: Science is not the easiest subject to explain.

Winter scenery is fun to explore

There is always something to explore in nature during the winter. Discover resident birds, identify cold-weather insects, learn about plant adaptations, and enjoy the sunshine and scenery.

Take Action: Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies' undergrad program seeks applicants

This summer, 10 undergraduate students will join the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies' research community to carry out science of their own design.

steward pickett

Pickett touts importance of stewardship and a diverse, collaborative ecological community

When sharing science with diverse publics representing a broad swath of cultural, ethnic, ideological and socioeconomic interests, it certainly helps when those doing the sharing are themselves representative of a diverse cross-section of society.

A summer of ecological exploration

Traditional academic calendars give teachers and students the summer off to unwind, but you wouldn't know that from the learning that took place on our campus.

Graduate education programs

Recently, the Cary Institute hosted two graduate courses. 

Limno-explorers: Discovering the world of water

Campers will conduct scientific investigations, learn about local natural history, and participate in team-building activities. 

campers 2011

Consider nature camps for kids this summer

Those lazy days of summer seem far way. However, if you’re a parent, now is the time when you may begin to ask yourself, “What will the kids do when school is out?”

Teaching ecology and evolution through mud worms

Ecology and evolution are often taught as independent topics in middle and high schools, though the two are intertwined in nature. 

Training tomorrow's stewards

Cary Institute educators immersed 5th grade students from Poughkeepsie's G.W. Krieger Elementary School in hands-on ecology inquiry. 

Kids ID schools' ecosystems

How can we "green" our schools to make them more environmentally sustainable?

Water cycle runs on a local level

When we think about the water cycle, most of us remember the diagram we were taught in third grade.

students

Cary Institute's hands-on science teaches thinking

A class of second-graders at St. Joseph School, Millbrook, gathers around a study plot in the grass of their schoolyard, marked by four pink flags in the shape of a square. 

Nurturing ecological understandIng

During the summer months, the Cary Institute’s campus bustles with educational activity. From campers getting their first introduction to climate change while exploring our property, to undergraduates conducting research projects under the mentorship of Cary Institute scientists—our staff is committed to nurturing ecological understanding in learners of all ages. 

At Cary Institute workshop, teachers are the learners


Imagine hiking through a forest on the Cary Institute's 2,000-acre property and wondering why the hemlock trees grow just in certain areas or whether the annual influx of tent caterpillars causes long-lasting damage.

You can inspire tomorrow's 'green heroes'

When I teach about the environment, I often worry my audience will be paralyzed by fear. As the science behind environmental issues improves, the predictions get worse

No Child Left Inside

What if our children could recognize the birds, plants and insects in their backyards as well as they know the brands of shoes on their feet or the secret weapons they need to get to the next level in a video game? 

Summer institute for teachers

Teacher training can infuse classrooms with current scientific thinking. When teachers are confident and engaged in new concepts, students benefit.

Institute helps teachers deepen their knowledge of ecosystems

Teacher training can help infuse classrooms with current scientific thinking. When teachers are confident and engaged in new concepts, students benefit

The changing Hudson project: Bringing ecology into the classroom

For over two decades, IES scientists have been paying close attention to conditions in the Hudson River. Through collaboration and perseverance, they have amassed world-class datasets on invasive species, aquatic food webs, and nutrient pollution. While this information is essential to effective management of the river, it is also a rich resource for educators who want to bring real ecology into the classroom.

The City As an Ecological Classroom: An Interview with Janie Gordon

The Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES) is a collaborative of over 30 researchers, educators and policy makers working together to understand how urban ecosystems function. Led by Institute Distinguished Senior Scientist Dr. Steward T. A. Pickett, other IES staff members involved in the effort include: Microbial Ecologist Dr. Peter M. Groffman, Educator Dr. Alan R. Berkowitz, BES Education Coordinator Ms. Janie Gordon, BES Information Manager Mr. Jonathan Walsh, and Administrative Assistant Ms. Holly Beyar.

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

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