Urban Ecology

sprinkler and fertilizer

National study reveals urban lawn care habits

What do people living in Boston, Baltimore, Miami, Minneapolis, Phoenix, and Los Angeles have in common? From coast to coast, prairie to desert – residential lawns reign.

Radio Interview with Steward Pickett

Podcast
Cary's Steward Pickett, Director of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, discusses urban ecology and the need to design more ecologically sustainable cities.

Urban Ecology: The Path to Sustainable Cities

Lecture Video

Director of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Steward Pickett discusses how urban ecology can make our cities greener, cleaner, and healthier for all.

Why does your yard look the same as every other yard?

Since 2011, scientists have been exploring people’s yards in six U.S. metropolitan areas–Los Angeles, Phoenix, Boston, Miami, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and Baltimore.

The many benefits of urban trees

Podcast

Trees increase property values in neighborhoods where they are planted. Through the evaporation of soil water, trees cool the urban environment, reducing the need for air conditioning.

When good ideas produce bad outcomes

Podcast

When rainwater passes over hard surfaces, like roads and parking lots, it accumulates pollutants, which are then washed into nearby waterways.

Improving water, improving lives

Podcast

Add water pollution to the list of ills suffered by under-served urban communities. Economically-depressed neighborhoods are hotspots for water contamination due to aging sewer and storm-water systems. Optimistically, a new study suggests that water cleaning and community greening can go hand-in-hand. 

Baltimore’s Watershed 263 experiment in socioecology

Projects that improve water quality by planting vacant lots, parking strips, and other urban spaces with trees and community gardens also bring people out of doors and teach local kids about their environment.

Bloom Town - The wild life of American cities

In places like Phoenix and Minneapolis, scientists think that cities are starting to look alike in ways that have nothing to do with the proliferation of Starbucks, WalMart or T.G.I Fridays.

Dr. Emma Rosi-Marshall named Director Designate of BES

Dr. Rosi-Marshall will be the next Director of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, Long-Term Ecological Research project, a role that is targeted to begin in 2016.

baltimore

Cities as ecosystems?

Podcast

Ecologists define an ecosystem as a unit of the landscape—a forest, a lake, or a river.  Often, they are interested in the movement of materials through that area.  Rain may deposit nitrogen in a forest, while a stream may carry nitrogen away from the forest and into a river.

An interview with Steward Pickett

As director of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, Pickett leads an ambitious, multi-partner effort looking at how urban areas function as ecosystems. 

trees

Trees invaluable to community

Dave Strayer and Gary Lovett sounded a warning about the looming local extinction of ash trees. This almost certain event is because of the spread of the emerald ash borer.

Ecological research in urban setting requires innovative methods

While most ecologists conduct field work in natural settings, Cary Institute scientists have pioneered the inclusion of urban and suburban landscapes in ecological research.

Even for city folks, ecology begins at home

When I was 13 years old, and supportive adults asked what I wanted to be when I grew up, I would enthusiastically blurt out, "I want to be an ecologist!"

Notes from the field: Lessons from the city

As the Director of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES), a Long Term Ecological Research project, I work with colleagues to reveal how watersheds can be used to understand interactions among social, biophysical, and built environments.

A good lawn is a small lawn

The great American lawn is about as far from a natural ecosystem as one can get. These artificial landscapes require an inordinate amount of resources to keep them in the green and manicured condition Americans have come to expect.

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

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