Climate Change

Summertime ozone

Podcast

Human activities are not direct sources of a lot of ozone, but ozone concentrations increase to markedly unhealthy levels in many areas during the summer. About 30 years ago, atmospheric chemists solved this mystery.

Is climate change to thank for dramatic recovery of acid rain's 'canary in the coal mine'?

There’s a dramatic recovery underway in New England. Red spruce, a tree species that researchers thought was doomed because of acid rain, is now growing faster than ever, and it’s not the only tree growing like gangbusters.

Cary Institute scientists provide leadership on 2014 National Climate Assessment

This week marks the release of the third National Climate Assessment (NCA). Issued to the President and Congress every four years, the report is a scientific analysis of how climate change is affecting our nation, including what we can expect in the future if the escalating problem is not addressed.

Aedes aegypti

As climate change alters ecosystems, scientists worry that exotic diseases will spread

Another public health challenge the National Climate Assessment will explore is the likelihood that diseases native to other geographical areas will migrate to the United States as climate changes alter ecosystems.

Capitol Hill briefing: Climate change and infectious disease

Audio
Speakers: Richard Ostfeld and George Luber

Topics covered include the controversy over whether climate change will increase the burden of infectious disease with a focus on malaria and other mosquito-transmitted diseases.

What 2013's weather means in the long run

For more than 30 years, the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook has collected information about local weather conditions. Equipment used to monitor acid rain was installed in 1983 and has provided continuous insight into rain and snow data.

How the spreading symptoms of climate change can be deadly

The hallmarks of a warming climate, heavier rains, more severe droughts, rising sea levels and longer growing seasons, are spreading a variety of pathogens throughout the world.

Dengue fever: Another formidable World Cup opponent

Brazil is a hot spot for dengue fever, a mosquito-transmitted virus that lacks a vaccine or treatment. The nation's 573 dengue deaths in 2013 through Nov. 20 is nearly double the 2012 toll.

Diseases on the move because of climate change

Warming temperatures and increased extreme weather events such as drought, rainstorms and flooding, contribute to the nation's changing disease map, experts say. USA Today reports on this trend and how it has impacted the spread of various diseases including tick-borne illnesses.

Tracking disease in a warming world

Podcast

Understanding how infectious diseases respond to climate change would help public health officials and environmental managers predict and mitigate disease impacts.

50 years after its discovery, acid rain has lessons for climate change

In the 1980s, the dying red spruce trees of New England—many of them taller than eight-story buildings and more than three centuries old—furnished frightening proof of the power of acid rain.

Climate change affects disease spread: The need to forecast

As our climate shifts and changes, wildlife and weather also shifts and changes. Now, researchers have found something else that's deviating from the norm.

Study highlights need to forecast how climate is impacting disease risk

Climate change is affecting the spread of infectious diseases worldwide, according to an international team of leading disease ecologists.

Wired forest may reveal how New England forests respond to climate change

Monitoring a forest in New Hampshire provides clues to how important trees, such as maples, respond to changed conditions due to global warming.

Predicting the forest of the future

Podcast

We hear a lot about how climate change will affect forests. Some projections show wholesale loss of species in the western U.S., due to fire and pests.

Can we capture the carbon?

Podcast

When I speak to public audiences about climate change, people often ask: Isn't there a way to capture and remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere?

Flood Forum Panel Discussion

Video

Panel discussion and Q&A segment of a flood management forum hosted at Cary on May 4, 2013.

Kingston Waterfront Flooding Task Force: A Case Study for Community-driven Flooding Adaptation

Video

Presentation by Gregg Swanzey, Director of the Office of Economic Development and Strategic Partnerships, City of Kingston and Libby Murphy, Climate Outreach Specialist, Hudson River Estuary Program, NYSDEC for a flood management forum hosted at Cary on May 4, 2013.

Climate Change and Extreme Precipitation

Video

Presentation by Climatologist Jessica Rennells for a flood management forum hosted at Cary on May 4, 2013.

Flood Recovery: Lessons Learned Along the Way

Video

Presentation by Commissioner of the Delaware County Department of Public Works Wayne Reynolds for a flood management forum hosted at Cary on May 4, 2013.

Flooding and the Ecology of Streams

Video

Presentation by aquatic ecologist Dr. Stuart Findlay for a flood management forum hosted at Cary on May 4, 2013.

Despite other 'evidence', our climate is changing

Some of my friends and relatives don't believe in climate change, so I regularly get emails containing evidence that climate change isn't real. The "evidence" contained in these emails usually falls into one of two categories.

Climate change and dead fish: Think global, act local

Many of us eagerly anticipate summer, when fishing, boating and swimming can happen at a favorite lake. This year, though, there may also be a bit of trepidation —  what lies ahead for Lake Auburn? Will we see another fish kill?

Cary Institute scientists help lead the National Climate Assessment

On January 14, a week before President Obama said Americans must respond to climate change in his inauguration speech, a draft of the 2013 National Climate Assessment (NCA) was released.

Climate Change and the Future of the National Park Service

Lecture Video

Jonathan Jarvis, Director of the National Park Service, discusses how climate change is manifesting itself in our national parks.

Climate change and the Big Apple

Podcast

A few months ago, Superstorm Sandy tore through the New York Metropolitan region, causing significant damage to homes, businesses, and municipal infrastructure. Hard hit areas, like the Jersey Shore and Staten Island, are still recovering.

Irene and Sandy show the effects of extreme weather on lakes

National Geographic reports on the impacts of extreme weather events and the importance of research that studies their ecological effects.

Report: Ecosystems more stressed than ever

A new report warns that climate change is causing shifts in species composition faster than expected. Co-author and Cary scientist Peter Groffman comments, "cold temperatures are a critical regulator of species outbreaks and also of species distributions".

Climate change already playing out in West, report says

A new report says the effects of climate change are already being felt in bug-infested forests of the Intermountain West, in reduced flows of the Colorado River basin and in the amount of snow that falls in the Rocky Mountains.

Bad news for maple syrup and moose

Podcast

Following an exhaustive review of more than fifty years of long term data on environmental conditions at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, the results are clear: spring is advancing and fall is retreating.

Forest reveals climate change's surprising damage

Long-term research on the impacts of climate change can give us insight on how certain environments will respond to warming temperatures. Poughkeepsie Journal reports on Cary research.

Indirect effects of climate change could alter landscapes

Researchers are recognizing the importance of understanding the effects of climate change on a local scale.

Maple syrup, moose, and the local impacts of climate change

Millbrook, N.Y. -- In the northern hardwood forest, climate change is poised to reduce the viability of the maple syrup industry, spread wildlife diseases and tree pests, and change timber resources.

Flooding of Wappinger Creek in Pleasant Valley. Photo credit: Lia Harris.

Data shows warming climate

Our region's changing climate will continue to have widespread effects on our natural resources, agriculture, infrastructure, and human health. 

Untangling climate impacts on forests

In assessing a major drop in nitrate loss from the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, it was revealed that past disturbances, such as logging, must be included. 

Global Climate Change

Global Climate Change: A Primer

Lecture Video

A lecture by Duke’s Orrin Pilkey and environmental artist Mary Edna Fraser. Fraser discusses her batiks, which are used to illustrate the threatened ecosystems in Pilkey’s book, Global Climate Change: A Primer.

Not just hot summers, climate change will affect winter, too

Podcast

Most people think about global warming during the dog days of summer. But temperatures are rising in the winter too, and that means less snow.

floods

Heavy rains linked to climate change

There was nothing "normal" about the weather in the 2011 growing season. We started out with a tremendously wet spring, making planting vegetables and field crops challenging.

polar bear

Ice loss a growing concern

Strange things are happening at the top of the Earth. Each summer, the Arctic Ocean, which is normally blanketed in floating sea ice, is losing more and more of its ice cover.

chipmunk with ticks

Has warming spread Lyme?

The Lower Hudson Valley has long been considered the epicenter for Lyme disease in New York state. As a result, most Dutchess County residents are well acquainted with the disease.

Data show global warming: Is Dutchess warming, too?

There is irrefutable evidence that global climate is changing at an unprecedented rate, and most of the worthwhile debate is now focused on what we should do to mitigate the effects.

Michael Mann

Dire Predictions: Understanding Global Warming

Lecture Video

Climatologist Dr. Michael Mann reviews the evidence for human influence on the climate, including measurements available for the past two centuries and paleoclimate observations spanning more than a millennium.

The Building Movement to Tackle Climate Change

Lecture Video

Author, educator, environmentalist, and 350.org founder Bill McKibben has been instrumental in raising awareness about global climate change.

The earth's climate continues to warm

The growing season is getting longer. 

snowy street

Tons of flakes and little rain put this winter among the snowiest

This has been a snowy winter. Our shovels have been put to good use, kids have had numerous snow days, and local retailers have had to restock essentials such as snow rakes and deicers.

Snow is Good

Lecture Video

Most people pay attention to climate change in the summer, when faced with heat waves, hurricanes, and severe thunderstorms. In the northeast, climate warming is actually more marked in the winter, and the loss of snow cover can have a ripple effect on tree growth and groundwater recharge.

A Wild Solution for Climate Change

Lecture Video

Internationally known conservation biologist Dr.Thomas E. Lovejoy explores the impact of climate change on the natural world.

Volcanoes may help to cool the Earth

A volcano erupts in Iceland, and cinders and sulfur dioxide are spewed into the atmosphere. 

Ice-out records track climate change

We identify the seasons through changes in biological and physical phenomena such as flowering, breeding or animal migration that mark an expected break in the pace of nature.

Storms of My Grandchildren

Lecture Video

Dr. James E. Hansen talks about how politicians have failed to connect policy with climate change science and the importance of limiting atmospheric carbon dioxide to 350 parts per million.

Thinking about climate change during the winter

When people think about climate change, the first thing that usually comes to mind is blazing hot summer days, severe droughts, or super-size hurricanes. But climate change is actually more significant in winter than in summer.

Global warming is real - despite email hoax

The recent hacking of e-mails at the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia Center — one of the world's foremost institutions for the study of climate change — offers a disconcerting view of how modern science is done. 

Carbon dioxide: Where does it go?

Few of us think about the state of the atmosphere until it fails to provide us with a hospitable environment. More often than not, human activities are behind atmospheric ills.

Biogeochemistry: Crucial to solving environmental problems

The Gulf of Mexico is home to a dead zone roughly the size of New Jersey. Inhospitable waters are caused by excess nitrogen that originates from distant Mid- western agribusinesses.  

Climate shift fails to curtail acid rain

Climate change predictions for the northeastern United States call for an increase in: precipitation, winter rain, winter flooding, and the frequency of nor'easters.

Cary Institute president advises Al Gore on climate change

Cary Institute President Bill Schlesinger participated in a roundtable discussion with Former Vice President Al Gore in New York City in mid-January.

Warmer world means spring birds return sooner

Ecologists study phenology, which is the orderly progression of seasonal events in nature, such as the springtime arrival of migrating birds, the first chorus of spring peepers in vernal pools, and the development of tree colors each autumn

Research energy, protect forests, and tax carbon to fight warming

Thankfully, the argument about the reality of global climate change seems finished. The majority of the public now joins the consensus of climate scientists, who have furnished compelling proof that the planet is warming and that humans are at least partly to blame.

Gauging growing season

Farmers and biologists typically consider the growing season in our region to run from March to September, although this may change as temperatures increase with climate change.

Local scientists aided Nobel-winning panel

Last year, we received certificates that featured attractive artwork, Alfred Nobel's name, and the King of Norway's signature. No, we didn't win the Nobel Peace Prize. But in 2007, our scientific contributions did help Al Gore and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change win theirs.

Is spring coming sooner?

This year, our maples and oaks put out new leaves, and our fruit trees started blooming about two weeks earlier than usual. Is this a symptom of climate change?

Warmer winters not only effect of climate change

With the cold temperatures of the past few days, one might think it would take sheer gall for me to write a column about global warming.

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