Freshwater

hudson river

How's the water? Quality issues arise for local creeks

At the Watershed Roundtable, held at SUNY New Paltz, some disturbing evidence was presented regarding pollution of both the Wallkill River and the Rondout Creek.

mussels in pipe

Don’t move a mussel (or a clam, or a snail)

Anyone that has spent time at a seaside pier has witnessed the destruction barnacles wreak on boat hulls. But biofouling animals are not limited to marine environments

Africa: Freshwater atlas to help nations conserve biodiversity

An online repository of maps has been launched to make information on freshwater biodiversity available on a common platform for use by scientists, policymakers, conservationists and NGOs.

The Gleon network: A pulse on the planet's lakes

We live on the blue planet. Some 70% of the Earth’s surface is covered with water, but only 2.5% is classified as fresh. And most freshwater is frozen in polar icecaps, or present in areas that can’t be tapped, such as deep underground aquifers or moisture in soils.

Dams complicate river management

Podcast

Managing fish in human-altered rivers is a challenge because their food webs are sensitive to environmental disturbances.

Antibacterial products fuel resistant bacteria in streams and rivers

Triclosan – a synthetic antibacterial widely used in personal care products – is fueling the development of resistant bacteria in streams and rivers.

Cary scientists study simulated streams

In a converted greenhouse off of Route 82, scientists at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies are planning to contaminate streams.Fortunately, those streams are in 20 fiberglass tubs at the institute's new Artificial Stream Facility.

'Rivers on Rolaids': How acid rain is changing waterways

Something peculiar is happening to rivers and streams in large parts of the United States — the water's chemistry is changing. Scientists have found dozens of waterways that are becoming more alkaline.

Where Rivers are Born: The Scientific Imperative for Defending Small Streams and Wetlands (pdf, 2 MB)

A handbook summarizing the scientific basis for the importance of maintaining the health and productivity of small streams and wetlands. Co-authored by Cary's David Strayer.

When antibacterials go down the drain

Podcast

Around half of liquid soaps now contain the chemical triclosan, as do toothpastes, deodorants, cosmetics, and other personal care products.

Cary scientist honored by EPA for Hudson River work

Aquatic ecologist Dr. Stuart E.G. Findlay was recently honored with an Environmental Quality Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for his work on the Hudson River.

Streams stressed by pharmaceutical pollution

Pharmaceuticals commonly found in the environment are disrupting streams, with unknown impacts on aquatic life and water quality.  

Decreased water flow may be trade-off for more productive forest

Bubbling brooks and streams are a scenic and much loved feature of forest ecosystems, but long-term data at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest suggests that more productive forests might carry considerably less water.

A New View of Adirondack Lakes

Video

A film about the sampling of water from 520 lakes in the Adirondack Park, filmed from an AirCam on floats in HD over three summers.

Cary mussel studies make "Science"

Some species of freshwater mussels are teetering on the brink of extinction. The Millbrook Independent reports on studies by Cary's David Strayer and Heather Malcolm.

Nearly buried, mussels get a helping hand

Science Magazine reports on causes for the widespread decline of freshwater mussels and cites Cary research studying the factors threatening mussel habitats.

Notes from the field: Western rivers

As part of her ongoing work to assess how human activity affects freshwater resources, aquatic ecologist Emma Rosi-Marshall spent this past summer studying nutrient cycling in large western rivers.

dandelion

An Ill Wind

Conservation Magazine reports on a study by Dr. Kathie Weathers and colleagues on how polluted streams contribute to airborne bacteria.

Hydrofracking in Focus: What Every Citizen Needs to Know

Science & Management Forum
Hosted: May 5, 2012 

An overview of the science behind gas extraction via hydraulic fracturing, including potential groundwater impacts and the treatment of wastewater.

Are fish made of maple leaves?

Podcast

Most of us learned about the aquatic food web in high school. Using a sealed aquarium, teachers explained that plants form the base of the web, with the organic carbon they create supporting aquatic life—from invertebrates to sport fish.

unpaved road

The dirty truth about unpaved roads

Podcast

In rural areas, unpaved roads hold a certain charm. They restrict the volume and speed of traffic and, compared to their paved counterparts, are less expensive to build. But are they a greener alternative?

Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System (HRECOS) grows

"This additional capacity will significantly increase our knowledge about what's going on in the Hudson River." 

pearly mussel

Why should we care about freshwater mussels?

Podcast

There were once three hundred species of mussels in the United States. They supplied food to Native Americans and people harvested them for pearls and for mother-of-pearl to make buttons. Now, hardly anyone eats freshwater mussels and buttons are mostly made of plastic.

forest

Mussel shells evoke visions of the past

Is it good or bad to be able to see ghosts? I’ve been wondering about this since I recently realized that I’ve been seeing ghosts ever since I began to study freshwater mussels about 30 years ago.

Cary helps lead effort to protect freshwater

From pollution and development to managing fisheries, society puts a lot of pressure on freshwaters. 

Fate of lakes focus of international meeting in Sunapee, NH

On October 10th-14th, more than a hundred scientists from twenty-four countries will meet at Lake Sunapee to discuss freshwater lakes and reservoirs, including what can be done to keep them healthy in the face of population growth and competing demands.

glen canyon dam

Colorado River can be revived

At the heart of the Grand Canyon is the river that helped to carve it.

Predicting environmental collapse

Early warning signs help you prepare for, and hopefully prevent, the worst case scenario. 

rock snot

Rock snot growing in New York rivers

As we approach the cold and flu season, a few of our nearby streams and rivers are just now getting over some serious congestion.

hudson river shoreline

Shorelines: Where people meet their river

When we see where the water meets the land, how many of us have considered how different types of shorelines influence the plants and animals residing in the river?

Salt makes roads safe but can pollute water

Each year about a million tons of road salt are applied to roads in New York state. What happens to all that salt?

Managing watersheds is complex, but critical

In July, Dutchess County celebrated Watershed Awareness Month. Throughout the region, educational activities highlighted the role that watersheds play in protecting the health of freshwater resources

Rising human demand for fresh water on course to put other species at risk

If you ever saw "Star Wars," you'll remember the trash compactor scene: Trying to escape from the Imperials, Luke and his friends duck into what turns out to be a trash compactor, where things go from bad to worse.

The mussel in the rainforest

This past summer, we unexpectedly found a very rare freshwater mussel in one of the small tributaries of the Housatonic River basin – a species that hadn’t been seen in the region since 1843.

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

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