Two numbers: Humans have burned up half the world’s biomass

By now the lesson is clear: Burning coal and petroleum produces carbon dioxide, the heat-trapping gas that contributes to the warming of our globe. That alone is enough reason to believe fossil fuels are not a sustainable basis for society long-term.

Time to hug a tree


Forest preservation is essential to combating climate change. Growing trees absorb carbon dioxide, storing it in their wood. Forest destruction is responsible for about 20% of human-caused carbon dioxide emissions into the Earth's atmosphere.

On biomass, EPA should follow the science

In America's Southeastern states, there's a booming energy trend that's as big a step backward as imaginable.

Scientists nationwide call on EPA to create scientifically strong pollution standards for biomass energy

Ninety one researchers from institutions across the country have signed a letter urging the EPA to follow the latest science on climate impacts from Biomass Energy.

NY carbon goals among the most ambitious

For New York to achieve its goals in the Obama administration's plan to reduce carbon emission from power plants, the state will have to do more than cut back on dirty fuel


Scientists attack biomass power subsidy

Some of the most distinguished scientists in the US have written to UK energy secretary Ed Davey, urging him to abandon the government's "misguided" subsidies for companies burning wood pellets to generate electricity.

Can we capture the carbon?


When I speak to public audiences about climate change, people often ask: Isn't there a way to capture and remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere?

Hydroelectric dams and carbon sequestration


One of the key ways of mitigating climate change is to keep carbon away from the atmosphere where it is found as carbon dioxide, a key greenhouse gas. Carbon that is stored in trees and other woody plants, in soils, and in the oceans is said to be sequestered.

steak dinner

The carbon impact of your meals


Many people have adopted a philosophy of buying local food because they are concerned about the carbon footprint of transporting food long distances. People are rebelling against tomatoes from South America and garlic from China, because they can reduce greenhouse emissions by buying locally. Some people even start their own gardens for this reason.

New Perspectives on Biogeochemical Cycles


Lecture by Cary President and biogeochemist Bill Schlesinger exploring new ways of examining global biogeochemical cycles and assessing human impact on the cycles of important biogeochemical elements.

Let's not put the last log on the fire


In an attempt to wean the nation from coal—an unhealthy source of energy that drives global warming, several policy groups have suggested switching to wood. Existing coal-fired power plants could be converted to burn wood with relatively little cost and expense. And trees have the benefit of being a renewable resource.

Warming your home with wood-an old idea becomes new again


In our quest for renewable energy, attention has shifted to our nation’s forests. Forest-based energy has the potential to be “carbon-neutral.” The carbon released into the atmosphere when trees are burned is taken back out of the atmosphere when new trees grow.

Carbon tax more efficient than cap-and-trade

Capitol Hill is abuzz with excitement over the Waxman-Markey bill, a 932-page document that includes cap-and-trade proposals to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and combat global warming.

Research energy, protect forests, and tax carbon to fight warming

Thankfully, the argument about the reality of global climate change seems finished. The majority of the public now joins the consensus of climate scientists, who have furnished compelling proof that the planet is warming and that humans are at least partly to blame.

Let lawn go - and reap the benefits

Today's obsession with perfect, park-like lawns is not only a waste of time and money; it's bad for the environment. Embrace a natural yard, as our household has done on about half of our property.

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