Long Lake, MI

Carbon and cannibalism: What happens to bass when you increase the amount of decomposing plant debris in an experimental lake

Lakes across the northern hemisphere are getting darker; causes include heavier rains, changes in land use patterns, and recovery from acid rain. Cary Institute ecologist Chris Solomon is working to advance understanding of how lake browning impacts fishery productivity. Recent work explores the role of phantom midges and bass cannibalism in this complex system.

Sustainable recreational fisheries focus of $1.5 million NSF grant

With support from a $1.5 million National Science Foundation grant, Christopher Solomon, an aquatic ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, is co-leading a study assessing links among people, lakes, and fish in the Northern Highland Lake District in Wisconsin, a region where fishing holds tremendous value economically, socially, and culturally. 

Author Rachel Breyta inspects a one-year-old steelhead trout for signs of IHNV exposure.

Tracking the spread of a deadly fish virus in the Pacific Northwest

A recent Ecology and Evolution study is the first to explore how IHNV spreads among juvenile hatchery-raised fish in the Pacific Northwest, where high rates of infection and mortality can occur. 

It’s a fish eat tree world

Most of the planet’s freshwater stores are found in the northern hemisphere, a region that is changing rapidly in response to human activity and shifting climatic trends. An international team of scientists analyzed 147 northern lakes and found that many rely on nutrients from tree leaves, pine needles, and other land-grown plants to feed aquatic life.

Temperate zone? Not so much

Whoever named the "temperate zone" must have had a sense of humor. I'm writing this during a week of humid, 90-degree days, and just a few months ago it was 13 below, a stiff north wind providing the icing on that frozen cake. Since then, we've had rain, snow, sleet, warm spells, cold snaps and thunderstorms.

Running Silver

Lecture Video

Biologist Dr. John Waldman discusses why sea-river fish have dwindled in numbers, what we stand to lose, and actions needed to ensure their recovery. Discover the past, present, and future of these fascinating fish through research, historical accounts, anecdotes, and images.


Go with the flow


Have you ever wondered what happens when a fish encounters a dam or a culvert? Too often, these structures are barriers to breeding and nursery sites, feeding grounds, and vital genetic mixing. In a warming world, barriers also prevent fish from seeking refuge as stream temperatures change.

Got dams or culverts? Speak up and help save fish

A public-private partnership is hoping to make travel a bit easier for Hudson Valley fish by figuring out all the places where fish can't get there from here, and then fixing as many of them as possible.

Dams destabilize river food webs: Lessons from the Grand Canyon

Managing fish in human-altered rivers is a challenge because their food webs are sensitive to environmental disturbance. So reports a new study in the journal Ecological Monographs, based on an exhaustive three-year analysis of the Colorado River in Glen and Grand Canyons.

Climate change and dead fish: Think global, act local

Many of us eagerly anticipate summer, when fishing, boating and swimming can happen at a favorite lake. This year, though, there may also be a bit of trepidation —  what lies ahead for Lake Auburn? Will we see another fish kill?

Overfishing: What Everyone Needs to Know

Lecture Video

Leading fisheries scientist and marine biologist Ray Hilborn shares his controversial insights about the future of our fisheries.

Why should we care about one endangered fish?


The humpback chub is a rather homely fish that lives only in the Colorado River. It is federally listed as protected under the Endangered Species Act.

Here's the fish, and here are the fish on drugs


We are a nation of pill poppers. From statins to lower cholesterol to antidepressants to lift our mood, more than half of Americans are currently taking a prescription drug. Some twenty percent of us are taking three different prescriptions daily.

It's time to remember to protect fish population

Losses of our local fish have been so severe that the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has completely closed commercial and recreational fishing for American shad in the Hudson River.

Farms, fish, and nitrogen pollution

How is the fish on your dinner plate tied to agricultural fertilizer? Let’s use the ecosystem approach to think about the big picture. On land, nitrogen-rich fertilizer is applied to crops to stimulate production. 

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