Hudson River

Zebra mussel

Scientific name: Dreissena polymorpha
Length: .25-1.5 inches
Native status: invasive
Origin: Eurasia

Decades of Hudson River data show the flow of time

Most research projects on the Hudson River look at a snapshot of time: a spring, a summer, a year or two. But the Hudson, like other rivers, is constantly changing.

Keeping a pulse on the Hudson River

Podcast

Technology has transformed our ability to understand rivers. Take the Cary Institute's longstanding scientific program on the Hudson River. 

Study documents Hudson River ecosystem changes over 25 years

The Hudson River includes a stretch where tides affect the river as much at its mouth near Manhattan as 150 miles inland at Troy, N.Y. Most of that section is freshwater.

'Morphing' Hudson begs for more study

We've all heard the expression, "Think global, act local." In the environmental context, its popularity no doubt comes from a sense of reassurance — that by taking small, personal steps, we can make a difference.

Rolling old river is indeed changing

The Hudson River has changed in many far-reaching ways over the past quarter-century as a result of human activity. Zebra mussels and other invasive species have changed the river's ecology.

hudson river

How's the water? Quality issues arise for local creeks

At the Watershed Roundtable, held at SUNY New Paltz, some disturbing evidence was presented regarding pollution of both the Wallkill River and the Rondout Creek.

Cary Institute debuts student competition with a focus on Hudson River science and creativity

Cary Institute educators are challenging middle school and high school students to creatively bring  long-term river data to life in the Hudson Data Jam, a new competition that melds science and creativity.

Protecting the watershed protects drinking water

Freshwater is essential to life, and healthy watersheds protect freshwater resources. Simply put, a watershed is an area of land that drains into a body of water, such as a lake or stream.

Removing nitrates keeps Hudson River healthier

For those of you who have taken the train trip to New York City, I hope you have noticed the large and varied wetlands on the east side of the tracks.

Real-Time Hudson River data Is displayed on Walkway Over The Hudson

A pedestrian bridge in New York has a new sign unveiled this week featuring real-time data about the Hudson River. Officials say the information will provide some useful facts to visitors while scientists monitor the river’s changing conditions.

Walkway sign monitors river in real time, keeps visitors informed

Environmentalists often lament that the things they seek to protect can't speak for themselves. But for the Hudson River, that's not true anymore.

New Walkway Over the Hudson sign explores river science in action

Each year, some half a million visitors explore the Walkway over the Hudson, a steel cantilever bridge that was converted into the nation's largest footbridge in 2009. And now, thanks to a new digital sign, visitors will be able to access real-time information about the river's environmental conditions.

Zebra Mussels and the Hudson River

In the Housatonic River, zebra mussels -- non-native bivalves that can move into a water body and just dominate it -- were found in 2009 in Massachusetts and in 2010 in Connecticut at Lake Lillinonah and Lake Zoar.

The Incidental Steward – Reflections on Citizen Science

Lecture Video

Whether it’s pulling up water chestnuts in the Hudson River, or searching out vernal pools—citizens can play a vital role in scientific research.

Cary scientist honored by EPA for Hudson River work

Aquatic ecologist Dr. Stuart E.G. Findlay was recently honored with an Environmental Quality Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for his work on the Hudson River.

Submersed Aquatic Vegetation Project

Since 2003, Cary Institute has solicited volunteers to monitor submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in the Hudson River as part of research to understand the ecological functions of these plants.

Cary mussel studies make "Science"

Some species of freshwater mussels are teetering on the brink of extinction. The Millbrook Independent reports on studies by Cary's David Strayer and Heather Malcolm.

The Hudson River Today

Podcast

Freshwater ecologist and author of The Hudson River Primer – The Ecology of an Iconic River Dave Strayer, discusses the positive effects of the federal Clean Water Act and other government regulations with Radio Rotary.

Monitoring Station Launched at Marist College

Video

A high-tech environmental monitoring station based at Marist College becomes the latest addition to the Hudson River Environmental Condition Observing System (HRECOS).

The Invasion: A Case Study on the Hudson River

Video

A short documentary by the American Museum of Natural History. The video highlights zebra mussels in the Hudson River and the Cary research that closely analyzed the river before, during and after the invasion.

Cary debuts new monitoring station

This summer Stuart Findlay held a press conference with partners to launch a high-tech environmental monitoring station based at Marist College.

Station to aid water-quality monitoring

A new high-tech environmental monitoring station was unveiled on the banks of the Hudson River. 

New Hudson River monitoring station in Poughkeepsie unveiled

The new monitor is part of a network of 15 stations that provides round-the-clock data on conditions in the Hudson from Albany to New York Harbor. 

New Hudson River monitoring station in Poughkeepsie unveiled

Cary Institute, NYSDEC, Marist, USGS and partners join forces to protect river.

The Hudson Primer

The Future of the Hudson River

Lecture Video

Dave Strayer, a freshwater ecologist at the Cary Institute,discusses the organization’s Hudson River Research Program, the river’s environmental recovery, and challenges that need to be met.

The floundering fish: Hudson River shad

Invasive species pose one of the top threats to the Hudson River. 

Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System (HRECOS) grows

"This additional capacity will significantly increase our knowledge about what's going on in the Hudson River." 

Ten steps to better shore zones

Shore zones can be among the most valuable habitats on our planet. So what can you do to protect them?

zebra mussels

More action needed to stop invasive species

Humans have carelessly moved thousands of species outside their native ranges through activities such as transfer of ballast water, release of pets and bait, movement of untreated wood, escapes from agriculture and aquaculture, and deliberate release of species that we thought to be beneficial.

Strayer authors primer on Hudson River ecology

As a main artery to Manhattan, the Hudson River is one of the most travelled and researched rivers in the world. 

HRECOS walkway installation

HRECOS observations not only protect a national treasure, they inform decisions about commercial traffic and management. 

My water comes from the Hudson River

A place-based curricula developed by Cary educators engages students in their local water cycle and teaches them how human activities and land-use can affect that cycle.

hudson river shoreline

Shorelines: Where people meet their river

When we see where the water meets the land, how many of us have considered how different types of shorelines influence the plants and animals residing in the river?

It's time to remember to protect fish population

Losses of our local fish have been so severe that the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has completely closed commercial and recreational fishing for American shad in the Hudson River.

Our river on drugs

Modern life is filled with an amazing assortment of chemicals. 

Manage pathways to block invasive species

Willie Nelson once sang that he only missed his ex-lover on three days: yesterday, today and tomorrow. This simple division of time works as well for invasive species as it does for heartbreak.

In the Hudson River, some fish are made of maple leaves

The lion's share (more than 90 percent) of the organic matter in the Hudson River comes from the landscape surrounding the river, rather than from plants and algae that live in the river. 

Report traces river's past

As we commemorate the 400th anniversary of Henry Hudson's historic voyage up the Hudson River, it is prudent to learn what we can from the past in order to maintain and improve this irreplaceable natural resource for future generations.

Observation network to help study Hudson River estuary

A collaborative monitoring project called the Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System has been implemented to provide continuous real-time data about estuary conditions in the Hudson River such as temperature, salinity, and pollutant loads.

Recording the evolution of an invasion: An interview with Dr. David Strayer

This past winter, the National Science Foundation renewed funding for the Institute’s long-term research on how the Hudson River is responding to zebra mussels. Introduced in 1991, the invasive bivalves are now the most abundant animals in the river. Institute scientists have generated the longest published record of this invasive species. 

The aliens that ate the Hudson River

If you’ve walked much along the Hudson’s shores, you’ve probably seen thorny, black water-chestnut seedpods piled up along the high-tide line, thick stands of common reed in wetlands and along the railroad tracks, mute swans gliding across the water, carp splashing in the shallows, chunky shells of Atlantic rangia on the beaches of Haverstraw Bay, and the thin, sharp shells of zebra mussels littering shorelines from Newburgh north.

The river of Islands

“Would Henry Hudson even recognize the Hudson River if he sailed up it today?” In this four-part series, Dave Strayer describes how much the river has been transformed over time.

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