Long-term Monitoring

'Rivers on Rolaids': How acid rain is changing waterways

Something peculiar is happening to rivers and streams in large parts of the United States — the water's chemistry is changing. Scientists have found dozens of waterways that are becoming more alkaline.

Hubbard Brook 50th anniversary celebrated by local scientists

Dr. Gene E. Likens, the Founding President of Millbrook's Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, recently celebrated 50 years of research at The Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES) in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

Bad news for maple syrup and moose

Podcast

Following an exhaustive review of more than fifty years of long term data on environmental conditions at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, the results are clear: spring is advancing and fall is retreating.

Indirect effects of climate change could alter landscapes

Researchers are recognizing the importance of understanding the effects of climate change on a local scale.

Maple syrup, moose, and the local impacts of climate change

Millbrook, N.Y. -- In the northern hardwood forest, climate change is poised to reduce the viability of the maple syrup industry, spread wildlife diseases and tree pests, and change timber resources.

Monitoring Station Launched at Marist College

Video

A high-tech environmental monitoring station based at Marist College becomes the latest addition to the Hudson River Environmental Condition Observing System (HRECOS).

The Invasion: A Case Study on the Hudson River

Video

A short documentary by the American Museum of Natural History. The video highlights zebra mussels in the Hudson River and the Cary research that closely analyzed the river before, during and after the invasion.

New Hudson River monitoring station in Poughkeepsie unveiled

Cary Institute, NYSDEC, Marist, USGS and partners join forces to protect river.

thermometer

Green science: Changes in temperature reflect warming climate

So how did 2011’s weather shake out in the grand scheme of things? First off, let’s make sure we are all on the same page regarding the difference between weather and climate.

Predicting environmental collapse

Early warning signs help you prepare for, and hopefully prevent, the worst case scenario. 

water sampling

Study detects clues to environmental collapse

By closely monitoring the conditions of a remote lake, researchers have found that environmental collapse shares characteristics of the early warnings of collapse in human health and the economy.

snowy street

Tons of flakes and little rain put this winter among the snowiest

This has been a snowy winter. Our shovels have been put to good use, kids have had numerous snow days, and local retailers have had to restock essentials such as snow rakes and deicers.

Carbon dioxide: Where does it go?

Few of us think about the state of the atmosphere until it fails to provide us with a hospitable environment. More often than not, human activities are behind atmospheric ills.

Report traces river's past

As we commemorate the 400th anniversary of Henry Hudson's historic voyage up the Hudson River, it is prudent to learn what we can from the past in order to maintain and improve this irreplaceable natural resource for future generations.

Warmer world means spring birds return sooner

Ecologists study phenology, which is the orderly progression of seasonal events in nature, such as the springtime arrival of migrating birds, the first chorus of spring peepers in vernal pools, and the development of tree colors each autumn

Observation network to help study Hudson River estuary

A collaborative monitoring project called the Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System has been implemented to provide continuous real-time data about estuary conditions in the Hudson River such as temperature, salinity, and pollutant loads.

Is spring coming sooner?

This year, our maples and oaks put out new leaves, and our fruit trees started blooming about two weeks earlier than usual. Is this a symptom of climate change?

Recording the evolution of an invasion: An interview with Dr. David Strayer

This past winter, the National Science Foundation renewed funding for the Institute’s long-term research on how the Hudson River is responding to zebra mussels. Introduced in 1991, the invasive bivalves are now the most abundant animals in the river. Institute scientists have generated the longest published record of this invasive species. 

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

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