Pharmaceutical Pollution

Pharmaceutical pollution accumulates in watersheds

Low dose, constant drip: Pharmaceuticals & personal care products impact aquatic life

When it comes to common chemicals in streams, the dose doesn't always make the poison for aquatic life

Today, even US water is overly medicated-these scientists want to change that

Sylvia Lee, PhD, is a scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, New York. She has access to an unusual-yet essential-set of laboratory equipment: a whole greenhouse filled with white fiberglass bathtubs. 

Drugs in our waters: Effects

Podcast

Pharmaceutical drugs and personal care products are showing up in rivers and streams throughout the United States and the rest of the world. What effects are they having on the environment? 

artificial stream

Drugs in our waters: Artificial streams

Podcast

Aquatic ecologist Emma Rosi talks about pharmaceuticals in waterways and research into the ways they may be affecting aquatic life.

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Science is falling woefully behind in testing new chemicals

Recently, a PBS documentary about Rachel Carson's life made headlines. Her seminal work Silent Springwhich documented the detrimental effects of pesticides—still stands as a pillar of the modern environmental movement. But a new report suggests that science has been struggling to stay afloat in a rapidly growing sea of chemicals.

Rosi testifies on pharmaceutical pollution

Video

A panel of experts, including Cary Institute aquatic ecologist Emma Rosi, discuss the issue of pharmaceutical pollution at a Pennsylvania Senate Environmental Resources Committee hearing.

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Synthetic chemicals: Ignored agents of global change

Despite a steady rise in the manufacture and release of synthetic chemicals, research on the ecological effects of pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and industrial chemicals is severely lacking. This blind spot undermines efforts to address global change and achieve sustainability goals.

Gwynns Falls in Baltimore has drug problem

Video

Gwynns Falls in Baltimore has a drug problem. Researchers found amphetamines, opioids and morphine in the water, and that kind of pollution is having an impact on the aquatic food chain. WBAL-TV reports.

Your drain on drugs: Meth seeps into Baltimore's streams

You shouldn't put illegal drugs in your body, and you shouldn't let neighborhood bodies of water ingest them, either. A new study suggests that aquatic life in Baltimore is being exposed to drugs, and it's having an impact.

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How amphetamine use may be affecting our waterways

New research has added to the growing body of evidence that the chemicals we put in our bodies often end up in our waterways — with noticeable consequences. 

Ecological consequences of amphetamine pollution in urban streams

Pharmaceutical and illicit drugs are present in streams in Baltimore, Maryland. At some sites, amphetamine concentrations are high enough to alter the base of the aquatic food web. 

Friday, February 27, 2015 - 7:00pm

Our Rivers on Drugs

Emma Rosi-Marshall, a freshwater ecologist at the Cary Institute, will discuss her research on how pharmaceutical drugs and personal care products are polluting our nation's rivers and streams.

"Antibacterial" soaps don't work, are bad for humans & the environment

On December 16, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a proposed rule that allows soap and hygiene product manufacturers one year to prove "antibacterial" additives are safe and effective.

The hidden cost of antibacterial products

Podcast

Triclosan, a synthetic antibacterial used in personal care products, is fueling the growth of resistant bacteria in streams and rivers.

Super-bacteria breeding in city streams

A recent study found antibiotic-resistant bacteria flourishing in Chicago's urban creeks and rivers at more than double the rates of woodland waterways.

Antibacterial products fuel resistant bacteria in streams and rivers

Triclosan – a synthetic antibacterial widely used in personal care products – is fueling the development of resistant bacteria in streams and rivers.

Pharmaceuticals disrupt sensitive stream habitat

Podcast

Pharmaceutical pollution is found in waters throughout the world. Causes include sewage overflows, aging infrastructure, and agricultural runoff. Even when waste water makes it to sewage treatment facilities, they aren't equipped to remove most pharmaceuticals.

Flushed drugs may threaten stream ecologies

Most streams that flow near cities and towns are laced with drugs that escape from sewage treatment plants or pharmaceutical factories.

Pharmaceutical pollution wreaking havoc on aquatic wildlife in freshwater streams

There has been a lot of concern over the possibility of pharmaceuticals ending up in freshwater and disrupting populations of wildlife. Now, new research shows that these concerns may be completely legitimate

Streams stressed by pharmaceutical pollution

Pharmaceuticals commonly found in the environment are disrupting streams, with unknown impacts on aquatic life and water quality.  

Funding supports pharmaceutical research

Emma Rosi-Marshall has received funding to help build an artificial stream facility on the Cary Institute's campus, to facilitate research on the effects of pharmaceuticals on stream ecosystems.

Here's the fish, and here are the fish on drugs

Podcast

We are a nation of pill poppers. From statins to lower cholesterol to antidepressants to lift our mood, more than half of Americans are currently taking a prescription drug. Some twenty percent of us are taking three different prescriptions daily.

From Silent Spring to Silent Night: A Tale of Toads and Men

Lecture Video

As part of the 2010 Young Environmental Scientists’ (YES) Conference, the Cary Institute hosted a talk by integrative biologist and National Geographic Society explorer Dr. Tyrone Hayes.

Our river on drugs

Modern life is filled with an amazing assortment of chemicals. 

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

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