Wildlife & Habitat

veery

Veeries very quiet when owls are about

Cary visiting scientist Ken Schmidt and his research team have been studying the ecology and behavior of birds on the Cary Institute grounds since 1998.

How green is your grass?

Podcast

Most of us are familiar with the stereotype of the peace-loving, tree-hugging hippy with a penchant for marijuana. So just how green is grass grown in sunny California? The answer might surprise you.

Wild bees, unsung heroes

Podcast

For more than a decade, pollinator populations have been declining. Causes are varied, from loss of habitat and pesticide exposure to the spread of parasitic mites

Overfishing: What Everyone Needs to Know

Lecture Video

Leading fisheries scientist and marine biologist Ray Hilborn shares his controversial insights about the future of our fisheries.

peeper

It's almost time for spring peepers

One of the first signs of spring in the Northeast is the unmistakable calling of the spring peeper. The peeper is a small frog, weighing only a few grams, but its mating call is louder than many songbirds weighing 10 times as much.

Forest reveals climate change's surprising damage

Long-term research on the impacts of climate change can give us insight on how certain environments will respond to warming temperatures. Poughkeepsie Journal reports on Cary research.

deer

Have deer gotten a false rap for Lyme disease?

Podcast

It's commonly believed that Lyme disease risk is tied to the presence of deer ticks and white-tailed deer. But this simply isn't correct.

Why you should brake for possums

Podcast

The next time you see a possum playing dead on the road, try your best to avoid hitting it. Because it turns out that possums are allies in the fight against Lyme disease.

acorns

Where did all the acorns go?

Podcast

For many years, oaks in the Northeast were prolific acorn producers. The 2010 crop was record-breaking—many will recall getting hit with acorn rain or slipping on acorns underfoot. Last fall, however, acorns were scarce.

cardinal

Eavesdropping on your neighbors? Even the birds do it

Podcast

Most of us use the sounds around our homes to take measure of our neighborhood: the sounds of lawnmowers, the next-door neighbors having a party, an alarm system being triggered—it's all part of the information we process about our surroundings.

pearly mussel

Why should we care about freshwater mussels?

Podcast

There were once three hundred species of mussels in the United States. They supplied food to Native Americans and people harvested them for pearls and for mother-of-pearl to make buttons. Now, hardly anyone eats freshwater mussels and buttons are mostly made of plastic.

Wolf

Yellowstone Wildlife: Charting New Paths Forward

Lecture Video

Mike Clark, Executive Director of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, talks about some of Yellowstone’s most iconic wildlife, and discusses how climate change, shrinking habitat, and politics are shaping its future.

fraser's penguins

Fraser's Penguins: A Journey to the Future in Antarctica

Lecture Video

Journalist and travel writer Fen Montaigne chronicles how climate change is threatening Adélie penguins.

ovenbird

Team to study how songbirds choose their nesting sites

During the spring and summer, Dr. Ken Schmidt, an avian behavioral ecologist from Texas Tech University, investigates bird life on the Cary Institute's 2,000-acre campus.

Bringing Nature Home

Lecture Video

Drawing from his bestselling book, Bringing Nature Home, Douglas Tallamy discusses how using native plants in the home landscape can help protect and preserve North American wildlife.

Environmental Impacts on the Antarctic Ecosystem

Lecture Video

Drawing on several of his journeys, Schlesinger’s lecture explores how climate change and pollution threaten this remote region, which supports penguins, seals, and fragile marine-based ecosystems.

Endangered Species Act changes must be reversed

In the face of our rising human population, a lack of protected areas for native species and for pristine ecosystems would result in the loss of many North American plants and animals. 

Tough times for polar bears

Polar bears are the largest terrestrial predators on Earth, outweighing lions, tigers, and all other bears. They have to be big to catch their major prey - seals and small whales

The Army Corps of Engineers vs. muskrat engineers: Nature declared winner

Muskrats have caused levee collapses in the past and will likely do so in the future.

Puffins' habits change habitat

In 1890, there were about 250,000 pairs of Atlantic puffins breeding on Grassholm, a 22-acre island a few miles off the southwest coast of Wales in the United Kingdom. By 1940, there were only 25 breeding pairs

The mussel in the rainforest

This past summer, we unexpectedly found a very rare freshwater mussel in one of the small tributaries of the Housatonic River basin – a species that hadn’t been seen in the region since 1843.

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