Podcasts

Our podcasts focus on raising awareness about the science that underpins environmental issues. Topics include climate change, energy, sustainable living, agriculture, and threats to air, water, and wildlife.

From 2012-2016, we collaborated with WAMC Radio to produce Earth Wise, a daily segment broadcast twice a day.

We are now partnering with Pulse of the Planet which broadcasts on over 270 (national and international) stations.

Selected Podcasts

Time to hug a tree

Podcast

Forest preservation is essential to combating climate change. Growing trees absorb carbon dioxide, storing it in their wood. Forest destruction is responsible for about 20% of human-caused carbon dioxide emissions into the Earth's atmosphere.

Spring flooding shapes streams

Podcast

In the Northeast, streams once covered in ice are flowing again. The floods that often accompany spring thaw bring big changes to these ecosystems.

The problem with coal ash

Podcast

Coal combustion in the U.S. generates around 130 million tons of coal ash each year, with power plants being the largest contributors. Bottom ash is collected from combustion chambers and fly ash is gathered from smokestacks and air pollution control devices.

Trade and trees

Podcast

Debate about the Trans-Pacific Partnership overlooks an unintended consequence of increased trade with Asia – the assault on America's trees.

The case for messy woodlands

Podcast

Does your property contain a patch of forest? When managing your woodland, resist the urge to keep things tidy. Dead and dying trees are a healthy part of forest ecosystems.

Leaky pipes and polluted waters

Podcast

Most of us don't spend a lot of time thinking about our wastewater. We want our toilets to flush and our dirty wash water to go down the drain. We assume this water is efficiently routed to a treatment facility, where it is cleaned up and returned to the environment. But reality doesn't measure up to our expectations.

Too much of a good thing

Podcast

Bags of garden fertilizer are labeled with three numbers, such as 15-4-5. These numbers indicate the percent of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium in the product. The remainder of the bag is filler that helps the fertilizer disperse.

The downside of nitrogen fertilizer

Podcast

Yesterday, we introduced the topic of synthetic nitrogen fertilizer. Anyone with a lawn or a garden is familiar with the product. But prior to the 1950s, it use was not the norm.

Toads: Warty, toxic, and resilient

Podcast

This spring, amphibians displayed their singing skills in the flooded lowlands at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies' Millbrook, NY campus. Eastern American toads were major contributors to the evening chorus, which was at times deafening.

Cleaning up with mussels

Podcast

Zebra mussels are one of the most pernicious invasive species in the United States having infested the Great Lakes in the 1980s and then having spread to 29 states by hitching rides on boats on inland waterways.

Time to move Lyme Disease Awareness Month to April?

Podcast

According to Rick Ostfeld, a disease ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, if we want to get a leg up on tick-borne illness we need to become vigilant earlier in the season.

The value of woodland pools

Podcast

Woodland pools are small, seasonal wetlands. In the Northeast, they are typically covered with ice and snow in the winter. In the heat of summer they dry up. And in the spring and late fall they contain standing water. Now is a great time for exploring the diversity of life in woodland pools.

prado wetland

Designer wetlands

Podcast

Drinking water supplies around the world often contain trace amounts of pharmaceuticals, agricultural and industrial chemicals, and other synthetic compounds that can harm reproduction in fish and may be linked to adverse health effects in humans. 

frog

Tough times for amphibians

Podcast

Around the world, millions of frogs, toads, and salamanders are dying from two emerging diseases. The first plague appeared in the 1990s, and is so deadly to amphibians that it is causing what has been described as the most spectacular loss of vertebrate biodiversity due to disease in recorded history.

Emptying the skies

Podcast

Here in the Northeast, winter is slowly giving way to spring. This means melting snow, thawing soils, and the return of migratory birds. The calls of warblers and woodcock and the thrill of spotting waterfowl like heron herald the warmer and greener days ahead.

coyote

Coyotes calling

Podcast

In New York State, if you hear howling at night, it's not a wolf. And it's not your imagination. When New York's wolves were killed off in the 19th century, it left an ecological vacuum that coyotes were happy to fill.

lake

An astonishing number of lakes

Podcast

Have you ever wondered how many lakes there are in the world? In an effort to answer this question, an international research team used satellite photos and computerized mapping technology to count up Earth's inland waters. They found about 117 million lakes, covering almost four percent of the planet's non-glaciated surface.

Lessons from Europe on warming lakes

Podcast

Do you wonder how climate change is affecting lakes? We just need to look across the pond, where scientists and agencies involved in the European Union’s Water Framework Directive have amassed an impressive body of research on the topic.

Teaming up to protect and manage lakes

Podcast

During a mild July in 1985, a cold front caused algae in Shelburne Pond, a small Vermont Lake, to quickly die back. Decomposing plants stripped the water of available oxygen, smothering aquatic life and causing a massive fish kill. 

Tuning into nature’s rhythms

Podcast

Our food, water, and even moods are tied to seasonal cycles. But only a select few tune into nature's rhythms and take careful notes.

The rising Hudson

Podcast

The Hudson River flows through much of the listening area of our flagship station. It is an extension of the Atlantic Ocean that flows from the Narrows in New York Harbor up through the Capital Region and beyond and it is linked to any changes in water levels in the Atlantic and around the globe.

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