Podcasts

Produced in collaboration with WAMC Northeast Public Radio, Earth Wise focuses on raising awareness about the science that underpins environmental issues. New topics are featured daily, with coverage on climate change, energy, sustainable living, agriculture, and threats to air, water, and wildlife.

Airs Monday through Friday at 11:10 a.m. and 4:04 p.m. on WAMC.

Access the complete archive of Earth Wise podcasts:
www.earthwiseradio.org.

Selected Podcasts

Summertime ozone

Podcast

Human activities are not direct sources of a lot of ozone, but ozone concentrations increase to markedly unhealthy levels in many areas during the summer. About 30 years ago, atmospheric chemists solved this mystery.

asian tiger mosquito

Mosquitoes in urban areas

Podcast

Now that summer is finally on the horizon, so too is mosquito season. More than an annoyance, mosquitoes can spread serious illnesses, like West Nile virus and Dengue.

What's all the talk about mute swans?

Podcast

In the late 1800s, mute swans were brought from Europe to the eastern U.S. to enhance the beauty of ponds on private estates.

Dirty drinking water

Podcast

EPA and U.S. Geological Survey scientists analyzed treated water samples from 25 U.S. utilities. They found that more than 1/3 contained chemicals not regulated by the federal Safe Drinking Water Act.

Let's quit carping about it

Podcast

In the 1960s, grass carp were brought to the U.S. from Asia to control weeds in southern fish-farming operations. Unfortunately, like so many other exotics, these fish escaped into the wild, and have been moving northward.

A mosquito fever expands its range

Podcast

A mosquito-borne virus that causes fever, headaches, and severe joint pain has spread to the Caribbean. Experts fear it's only a matter of time before it makes its way to the U.S. 

Salty streams and rivers

Podcast

By the looks of it, we're in for quite a winter this year. Here in the Northeast, we've seen several heavy snowfalls, freezing temperatures, and icy roads.

Invaders underfoot in our forests

Podcast

Despite their familiarity, earthworms are an invasive species in America's northern temperate forests. They arrived in the mid-1800s, with the arrival of European settlers.

Let's talk about ammonia

Podcast

Most of us are familiar with ammonia as an irritating gas that is emitted from window-cleaning fluids. It is a great way to cut through grease that has condensed on glass.

Tracking disease in a warming world

Podcast

Understanding how infectious diseases respond to climate change would help public health officials and environmental managers predict and mitigate disease impacts.

The hidden cost of antibacterial products

Podcast

Triclosan, a synthetic antibacterial used in personal care products, is fueling the growth of resistant bacteria in streams and rivers.

Dams complicate river management

Podcast

Managing fish in human-altered rivers is a challenge because their food webs are sensitive to environmental disturbances.

Warming the tundra

Podcast

A lot of dead plant material is stored in the tundra soils of the far north. Most of it is frozen in permafrost, and inaccessible to the microbes that normally decompose organic matter in soils.

Powassan encephalitis

Podcast

The number of tick-borne illnesses reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is on the rise. Lyme disease leads the pack, with some 35,000 cases reported annually. 

The signal before the collapse

Podcast

What do earthquakes, heart attacks, seizures, and the collapse of stock markets and fisheries have in common? They're all examples of what scientists call "tipping points" or "regime shifts."

How green is your grass?

Podcast

Most of us are familiar with the stereotype of the peace-loving, tree-hugging hippy with a penchant for marijuana. So just how green is grass grown in sunny California? The answer might surprise you.

All the salt we put on our roads in the winter has to go somewhere

Podcast

Across the Northeastern US, over 10 million tons of sodium chloride is applied to roadways annually. We also rely on salt to prevent falls on walkways and driveways. While useful for stabilizing slippery surfaces, salt use comes at a cost.

baltimore

Cities as ecosystems?

Podcast

Ecologists define an ecosystem as a unit of the landscape—a forest, a lake, or a river.  Often, they are interested in the movement of materials through that area.  Rain may deposit nitrogen in a forest, while a stream may carry nitrogen away from the forest and into a river.

When antibacterials go down the drain

Podcast

Around half of liquid soaps now contain the chemical triclosan, as do toothpastes, deodorants, cosmetics, and other personal care products.

fog

We all know about rain forests. Now we are learning about fog forests

Podcast

There's a desert in north-central Chile that receives less than six inches of rain a year. Right in the middle of it is a lush mountain forest that is dense with trees, bromeliads, ferns, and mosses.

The sound of spring

Podcast

In the Northeast, one of the first signs of spring is the unmistakable calling of the spring peeper. While this small frog weighs only a few grams, its mating call is louder than that of many songbirds ten times its size.

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