Podcasts

Produced in collaboration with WAMC Northeast Public Radio, Earth Wise focuses on raising awareness about the science that underpins environmental issues. New topics are featured daily, with coverage on climate change, energy, sustainable living, agriculture, and threats to air, water, and wildlife.

Airs Monday through Friday at 11:10 a.m. and 4:04 p.m. on WAMC.

Access the complete archive of Earth Wise podcasts:
www.earthwiseradio.org.

Selected Podcasts

Let's quit carping about it

Podcast

In the 1960s, grass carp were brought to the U.S. from Asia to control weeds in southern fish-farming operations. Unfortunately, like so many other exotics, these fish escaped into the wild, and have been moving northward.

A mosquito fever expands its range

Podcast

A mosquito-borne virus that causes fever, headaches, and severe joint pain has spread to the Caribbean. Experts fear it's only a matter of time before it makes its way to the U.S. 

Salty streams and rivers

Podcast

By the looks of it, we're in for quite a winter this year. Here in the Northeast, we've seen several heavy snowfalls, freezing temperatures, and icy roads.

Invaders underfoot in our forests

Podcast

Despite their familiarity, earthworms are an invasive species in America's northern temperate forests. They arrived in the mid-1800s, with the arrival of European settlers.

Let's talk about ammonia

Podcast

Most of us are familiar with ammonia as an irritating gas that is emitted from window-cleaning fluids. It is a great way to cut through grease that has condensed on glass.

Tracking disease in a warming world

Podcast

Understanding how infectious diseases respond to climate change would help public health officials and environmental managers predict and mitigate disease impacts.

The hidden cost of antibacterial products

Podcast

Triclosan, a synthetic antibacterial used in personal care products, is fueling the growth of resistant bacteria in streams and rivers.

Dams complicate river management

Podcast

Managing fish in human-altered rivers is a challenge because their food webs are sensitive to environmental disturbances.

Warming the tundra

Podcast

A lot of dead plant material is stored in the tundra soils of the far north. Most of it is frozen in permafrost, and inaccessible to the microbes that normally decompose organic matter in soils.

Powassan encephalitis

Podcast

The number of tick-borne illnesses reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is on the rise. Lyme disease leads the pack, with some 35,000 cases reported annually. 

The signal before the collapse

Podcast

What do earthquakes, heart attacks, seizures, and the collapse of stock markets and fisheries have in common? They're all examples of what scientists call "tipping points" or "regime shifts."

How green is your grass?

Podcast

Most of us are familiar with the stereotype of the peace-loving, tree-hugging hippy with a penchant for marijuana. So just how green is grass grown in sunny California? The answer might surprise you.

When antibacterials go down the drain

Podcast

Around half of liquid soaps now contain the chemical triclosan, as do toothpastes, deodorants, cosmetics, and other personal care products.

Marine invaders in the global marketplace

Podcast

Next time you go shopping, keep an eye out for the origins of the things you purchase. From kiwis grown in Chile to shirts made in Bangladesh – we are living in the age of the global marketplace.

Predicting the forest of the future

Podcast

We hear a lot about how climate change will affect forests. Some projections show wholesale loss of species in the western U.S., due to fire and pests.

The many benefits of urban trees

Podcast

Trees increase property values in neighborhoods where they are planted. Through the evaporation of soil water, trees cool the urban environment, reducing the need for air conditioning.

rebecca allen painting

Science, art, and music-all in the same room

Podcast

The Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies is a scientific research and education organization. Sixteen Ph.D. scientists explore pressing environmental problems including acid rain, forest health, the ecology of Lyme disease, and pharmaceuticals in our waterways.

burmese python

Invasive species: good, bad, or neither?

Podcast

When we hear about the devastation caused by invasive species like emerald ash borers and hemlock wooly adelgids, it is easy to believe that all invasives should be killed. But in fact many well established invasives have neutral or even positive qualities: witness the popular sport fish rainbow trout and large-mouth bass.

Hydroelectric dams and carbon sequestration

Podcast

One of the key ways of mitigating climate change is to keep carbon away from the atmosphere where it is found as carbon dioxide, a key greenhouse gas. Carbon that is stored in trees and other woody plants, in soils, and in the oceans is said to be sequestered.

unpaved road

The dirty truth about unpaved roads

Podcast

In rural areas, unpaved roads hold a certain charm. They restrict the volume and speed of traffic and, compared to their paved counterparts, are less expensive to build. But are they a greener alternative?

Fish have to eat

Podcast

My colleague Emma Rosi-Marshall is an aquatic ecologist at the Cary Institute. One of her research projects involves an endangered fish called the humpback chub. She and her team spend a lot of time counting insects in the Colorado River downstream of the Glen Canyon Dam. You might think her time would be better spent counting the actual fish, but her approach will provide us with a lot more information.

Pages

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

Privacy Policy Copyright © 2016