Podcasts

Our podcasts focus on raising awareness about the science that underpins environmental issues. Topics include climate change, energy, sustainable living, agriculture, and threats to air, water, and wildlife.

From 2012-2016, we collaborated with WAMC Radio to produce Earth Wise, a daily segment broadcast twice a day.

We are now partnering with Pulse of the Planet which broadcasts on over 270 (national and international) stations.

Selected Podcasts

lake

An astonishing number of lakes

Podcast

Have you ever wondered how many lakes there are in the world? In an effort to answer this question, an international research team used satellite photos and computerized mapping technology to count up Earth's inland waters. They found about 117 million lakes, covering almost four percent of the planet's non-glaciated surface.

Lessons from Europe on warming lakes

Podcast

Do you wonder how climate change is affecting lakes? We just need to look across the pond, where scientists and agencies involved in the European Union’s Water Framework Directive have amassed an impressive body of research on the topic.

Teaming up to protect and manage lakes

Podcast

During a mild July in 1985, a cold front caused algae in Shelburne Pond, a small Vermont Lake, to quickly die back. Decomposing plants stripped the water of available oxygen, smothering aquatic life and causing a massive fish kill. 

Tuning into nature’s rhythms

Podcast

Our food, water, and even moods are tied to seasonal cycles. But only a select few tune into nature's rhythms and take careful notes.

The rising Hudson

Podcast

The Hudson River flows through much of the listening area of our flagship station. It is an extension of the Atlantic Ocean that flows from the Narrows in New York Harbor up through the Capital Region and beyond and it is linked to any changes in water levels in the Atlantic and around the globe.

kudzu

New York’s ban on invasive species goes into effect

Podcast

In a win for New York State’s natural areas, new regulations have gone into effect banning a long list of plants and animals that have plagued our fields, forests, and freshwaters. 

Algorithms and ecology: A new partnership

Podcast

If you shop online, this is a familiar scenario: You click on a product like a book, and the online merchant presents you with a list of related items. "If you like X, you might also like Y."

The murky Hudson

Podcast

Visitors to New York's Hudson River often comment on how "dirty" or murky its water appears. This murkiness is often taken as a sign of poor water quality. Why does the river look so muddy? And what does it mean?

Defining protected waters

Podcast

In the late 1960s, our country’s fresh waters were in crisis.  Ohio’s Cuyahoga River and the Detroit’s Rouge River were prone to fires. Time Magazine declared Lake Erie dead.

Holy Toledo!

Podcast

Tiny blue-green algae brought Toledo, Ohio’s municipal water system to a halt this summer. Toxic blooms left residents scrambling for bottled water to meet their drinking, cooking, and washing needs.

In a warmer world, the ticks that spread disease are arriving earlier

Podcast

In the northeastern US, warmer spring temperatures are leading to shifts in the emergence of the blacklegged ticks that carry Lyme disease and other tick-borne pathogens.

Road Salt

Podcast

In the U.S. alone, some 15 million tons of salt is applied to roadways each year. While its use has real benefits, in terms of safety and navigation, there have been cumulative costs to the environment.

Keeping a pulse on the Hudson River

Podcast

Technology has transformed our ability to understand rivers. Take the Cary Institute's longstanding scientific program on the Hudson River. 

Science and art

Podcast

Science and art are rarely thought of as going hand-in-hand. In fact, we typically think of scientists and artists as having entirely different type of brains – one logical and analytical, the other creative and subjective.

The referee called "foul"

Podcast

As a child, I remember looking with some fascination at barnacles on the piers in a Cape Cod harbor, and reading about how their growth on the bottoms of boats so slowed their progress in the water that dry-docking for barnacle removal was a common practice

Bad news for maple syrup and moose

Podcast

Following an exhaustive review of more than fifty years of long term data on environmental conditions at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, the results are clear: spring is advancing and fall is retreating.

When antibacterials go down the drain

Podcast

Around half of liquid soaps now contain the chemical triclosan, as do toothpastes, deodorants, cosmetics, and other personal care products.

Salty streams and rivers

Podcast

By the looks of it, we're in for quite a winter this year. Here in the Northeast, we've seen several heavy snowfalls, freezing temperatures, and icy roads.

Summertime ozone

Podcast

Human activities are not direct sources of a lot of ozone, but ozone concentrations increase to markedly unhealthy levels in many areas during the summer. About 30 years ago, atmospheric chemists solved this mystery.

Here's the fish, and here are the fish on drugs

Podcast

We are a nation of pill poppers. From statins to lower cholesterol to antidepressants to lift our mood, more than half of Americans are currently taking a prescription drug. Some twenty percent of us are taking three different prescriptions daily.

The many benefits of urban trees

Podcast

Trees increase property values in neighborhoods where they are planted. Through the evaporation of soil water, trees cool the urban environment, reducing the need for air conditioning.

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