Wildlife & Habitat

The Latest

Wildebeest drownings feed a river ecosystem for years

More than a million wildebeests migrate each year in East Africa, moving from Tanzania to Kenya and back again. These antelopes, also known as gnus (NEUZ), follow the rains and abundant grass that will later spring up.

How wildebeest deaths sustain the Mara ecosystem

From documentaries to real life, the mass carnage of the wildebeest in migration is a natural phenomenon that remains the world's largest terrestrial animal migration.

toilet sampling

In urban Baltimore, poor neighborhoods have more mosquitoes

A new study published in the Journal of Medical Entomology reports that in Baltimore, Maryland, neighborhoods with high levels of residential abandonment are hotspots for tiger mosquitoes (Aedes albopictus). This environmental injustice may leave low-income urban residents more vulnerable to mosquito-borne disease.

Marabou storks

How 2 million pounds of rotting flesh helps the Serengeti

For wildebeest, the yearly migration across the Serengeti can mean life or death. Predators such as crocodiles and big cats lie in wait as the herd of more than one million makes its 1,000-mile loop across the savannas of Tanzania and Kenya.

Related Projects

Pulsed Resources and Consumer Communities in Terrestrial Systems

In forests dominated by mast-producing trees,consumers are confronted with the sporadic production of abundant resources. Animals, such as the white-footed mouse and eastern chipmunk, rely on these pulsed resources.

Pearly Mussel Ecology

What controls the distribution and abundance of pearly mussels, a species-rich and highly endangered group of animals in eastern North America? 

Controlled Focused Hunting

Stabilizing a deer population requires a balance between annual recruitment and mortality. For a population reduction, mortality must exceed recruitment. Using hunting as our primary management tool, our hunters are required to focus their efforts on culling females as well as males.

Monitoring Trends in Deer Abundance

Presently, hunter observations are used as the technique to assess if Cary controlled hunts are stabilizing local deer numbers. Night spotlight counts of deer have been used to index trends in abundance in the past. The observations of deer by bow hunters, has yielded data that have correlated very well with spotlighting numbers with the observation data easier and less expensive to obtain.

Monitoring Deer Browsing

Since 1983, Mr. Winchcombe has been monitoring the intensity of deer browsing on the major tree species on the Cary Institute's grounds. Browsing intensity varies annually, with over-winter browsing linked to total winter snowfall amounts. Browsing studies help govern deer management strategies, with heavy browsing highlighting the need to further reduce local deer numbers.

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