Environmental Policy

As an independent not-for-profit, we are in a unique position to provide unbiased data on critical environmental issues. Acid rain research pioneered here was instrumental in the creation of protective Clean Air Act Amendments.

The Latest

arctic ice

Climate change economics

In the politically-charged world of climate change, an important paper appeared in Science last month, written by Solomon Hsiang and 11 others, assessing the regional impacts of the projected changes in climate on the economic productivity within the U.S. 

The answer is blowing in the wind

Most people accept that coal is a dirty fuel: Dirty to mine, dirty to burn, and dirty to dispose of the ash. Already there is a shift away from coal-fired power plants, but they still account for 30% of our electric power nationwide. 

Seven documented reasons why YOU should care about climate change

The New York Times reports that most Americans believe that our climate is changing, and a majority of them feel that the combustion of coal should be scaled back.  But, what lags in public opinion is the motivation to do very much else about climate change.  Most people don’t think climate change will matter to them.

When science informed policy

At any moment, science gives us its best explanation of reality. It proceeds by rigorous tests of hypotheses through observation and experimentation.

Related Projects

Tree-SMART Trade

Growing reliance on both trees and trade makes imported forest pests the most pressing, and under-appreciated, forest health issue in the US today. Five high-priority policy actions that build on proven prevention measures can reduce the arrival and establishment of new forest pests.

Baltimore Ecosystem Study

The Cary Institute has taken a lead role in developing programs in urban ecology aimed at understanding urban ecosystems, one of Earth's fastest growing environments.

Hudson River Ecosystem Study

For three decades, our scientists have been researching the Hudson River ecosystem– from the way shoreline development impacts water quality to how invasive species influence resident plants and animals. As a result, the Hudson is the most scientifically scrutinized river in the world.

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

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