Forests

The Latest

Invasive Pests Jeopardize US Forests, Kill Trees

Video

The scourge of forest pests is expected to put almost two thirds of America’s forests at risk by 2027, costing several billion dollars every year for dead tree removal and jeopardizing longstanding U.S. industries that rely on timber. 

Scientists warn that speck-size insects are on track to damage most U.S. forests

Scientists say bugs such as the hemlock woolly adelgid and emerald ash borer, both native to Asia, are driving some tree species toward extinction and are causing billions of dollars a year in damage.

How to prevent the next emerald ash borer

The emerald ash borer, a beetle native to Asia, is presently established around Concord, N.H., and can be expected to eliminate ash trees from most of New England within a decade. 

Imported forest pests the greatest threat to U.S. Trees

When asked ‘what’s the greatest threat facing U.S. trees,’ common answers are climate change and development. 

Related Projects

Tree-SMART Trade

Growing reliance on both trees and trade makes imported forest pests the most pressing, and under-appreciated, forest health issue in the US today. Five high-priority policy actions that build on proven prevention measures can reduce the arrival and establishment of new forest pests.

Effects of Invasive Hemlock Woolly Adelgid on Northeastern Forests

Hemlock is a "foundation" tree species in eastern forests and its presence defines the properties of a unique ecosystem that is presently declining due to the introduction and spread of an invasive insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid.

soil

Base Cation Depletion: Organic Matter Quality & Microbial Processes

We are analyzing how changes in soil base status can influence microbial physiology, organic matter quality, and microbial activity in northern hardwood forests at Hubbard Brook.

Ecosystem Effects of Exotic Forest Pests

Over the last century, forests of the eastern U.S. have been plagued by a series of devastating introductions of exotic pests.

cary forest

Long-Term Monitoring of the Forest Ecosystem at Cary

We measure key aspects of forest productivity, species composition and nutrient cycling in the mixed-oak forest at Cary. This long-term monitoring allows us to track trends in the forest ecosystem resulting from air pollution and other stresses.

Pulsed Resources and Consumer Communities in Terrestrial Systems

In forests dominated by mast-producing trees,consumers are confronted with the sporadic production of abundant resources. Animals, such as the white-footed mouse and eastern chipmunk, rely on these pulsed resources.

Buell-Small Succession Study

Post-agricultural plant community succession is being studied in permanent plots in central New Jersey.

Effects of Beech Bark Disease on Catskill forests

This project is focused on the consequences of the invasion of the beech bark disease (BBD) in northern hardwood forests, which dominate the uplands of the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada.

Catskill Mountain Ecosystems

This project is primarily focused on understanding the ecology and nutrient cycling of Catskill forests and the responses of the forests to stresses such as air pollution and introduced pests.

Controlled Focused Hunting

Stabilizing a deer population requires a balance between annual recruitment and mortality. For a population reduction, mortality must exceed recruitment. Using hunting as our primary management tool, our hunters are required to focus their efforts on culling females as well as males.

Monitoring Trends in Deer Abundance

Presently, hunter observations are used as the technique to assess if Cary controlled hunts are stabilizing local deer numbers. Night spotlight counts of deer have been used to index trends in abundance in the past. The observations of deer by bow hunters, has yielded data that have correlated very well with spotlighting numbers with the observation data easier and less expensive to obtain.

Monitoring Deer Browsing

Since 1983, Mr. Winchcombe has been monitoring the intensity of deer browsing on the major tree species on the Cary Institute's grounds. Browsing intensity varies annually, with over-winter browsing linked to total winter snowfall amounts. Browsing studies help govern deer management strategies, with heavy browsing highlighting the need to further reduce local deer numbers.

Snow Depth & Soil Freezing as a Regulator of Microbial Processes

In the northern hardwood forests in New Hampshire we are analyzing how soil freezing events cause root and microbial mortality, which can lead to increased rates of N and P mineralization and loss. 

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

Privacy Policy Copyright © 2016