2014 News Archive

Why you shouldn't use hand sanitizers

Cary-led research has found that antibacterials, such as triclosan, have made their way into the American water system and are fueling the development of drug-resistant bacteria. And there are human health-related reasons to avoid their use in our daily lives.

Bumper acorn crop now, not good news for Lyme disease later

Mice, chipmunks and shrews are welcoming hosts for the bacteria ticks spread. They're plentiful. They're low to the ground, so ticks can easily hop aboard. And they lack the immune systems that might compromise any infectious agents.

Cutting down on salt

Experts and officials look for ways to reduce the use of road salt, which can persist in the environment for many years. 

Storm Ecology: Light

Podcast
Any time there are high flow events bringing water and sediments from the tributaries and over the dam, it causes several fairly dramatic changes. Podcast interview with freshwater ecologist Dr. Stuart Findlay.

Storm Ecology: Trickle down

Podcast
Heavy storms cause a lot more than water to come trickling down into our rivers. Podcast interview with freshwater ecologist Dr. Stuart Findlay.

Waning light spurs autumn foliage display

Vicky Kelly, manager of the environmental monitoring program at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook said trees have evolved methods for coping with our winters over thousands of years, the biggest trigger of which is shortened days.

Baltimore and Beijing: A learning expedition to China

This last summer, I had the pleasure of being hosted as a Visiting International Professor by the Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences in Beijing.

Allow us to introduce the "Gloeo Gang"

In the first of a series of serendipitous events leading to today’s Gloeo Gang, an undergraduate Cayelan contacted the Lake Sunapee Protective Association (LSPA, lakesunapee.org), a nonprofit watershed group of energetic citizen scientists with a keen interest in their home lake (Sunapee) in New Hampshire

raccoon

Small, fast, and crowded: Mammal traits amplify Lyme disease risk

In the U.S., some 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease annually. Thousands also suffer from babesiosis and anaplasmosis, tick-borne ailments that can occur alone or as co-infections with Lyme disease.

Cleaning up the Clean Water Act

I spent a lot of time outdoors as a kid in southern Michigan in the 1960s and 70s. The river in my hometown was a sour-smelling mess the color and consistency of potato soup, the miles of enticing beaches along nearby Lake Erie were never once open for swimming, 

An interview with Cary guest lecturer Steven Cohen

Robin Hood Radio interviews Steven Cohen, Executive Director of Columbia University’s Earth Institute, about his Cary Institute lecture The Path to Sustainability. Cohen discusses the importance of environmental policy and the need to manage short-term costs for long-term gains.  

Cary Institute students present their findings

On August 15 the 12 students in this year’s Cary Institute’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program presented the results of the research they conducted during the ten weeks they spent at the Institute this summer.

Scientists track ticks as they move north

While Lyme disease is usually found along coastal areas-the mid-Hudson valley, Long Island, and parts of the Jersey shore-people are now reporting tick bites further and further north into the Capital region, and even some people in the Adirondacks

Toxic algae can put water sources at risk

Perhaps this summer’s most ironic story was the news that residents of Toledo, Ohio, a city on the shores of one of the largest and most magnificent lakes in the world, had no water to drink. 

Ecologists optimistic about power to change

I often hear that ecologists should stop being so gloomy. After all, the world isn’t coming to an end — the sky is still blue, the grass is still green and the birds are still singing.

Supporters Corner: Aldo Leopold Society

Nearly 100 members of the Aldo Leopold Society attended the Ned Ames Honorary Lecture on April 25 featuring Bill Schlesinger’s last official presentation, “If I had a Hammer.” 

Welcoming Barbara Han

Join us in welcoming Dr. Barbara Han, the newest addition to the Cary Institute’s growing infectious disease ecology team.

Hudson Data Jam

For more than thirty years, our researchers have been studying the Hudson River and its watershed, analyzing everything from water chemistry to invasive species. That vast data set was the inspiration for a new offering by our Education Program.

Discover our grounds

Looking to commune with nature? One of the Hudson Valley’s best kept secrets is the Cary Institute’s 2,000-acre campus.

An interview with Jon Cole

Cary Institute biogeochemist Dr. Jonathan Cole recently received one of the highest distinctions a scientist can achieve: election into the National Academy of Sciences. The honor recognizes his distinguished career in limnology, the study of lakes, rivers, and other inland waters.

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