EcoFocus - Fall 2016

From our President

Understanding the ecology of infectious diseases is critical to protecting public health. In the U.S., tick-borne diseases are becoming more prevalent thanks, in part, to climate change. 

Kathie Weathers Hutchinson Chair

Senior Scientist Kathie Weathers was recently named the G. Evelyn Hutchinson Chair in Ecology, in recognition of her achievements advancing freshwater science. 

Strayer and Jones retirement

June 31 marked the retirement of two longstanding members of the Cary Institute’s scientific staff.

Chris Solomon, freshwater ecologist, joins the Cary institute

Chris Solomon is the newest addition to the Cary Institute’s scientific staff. 

Lessons from the forest

Since the 1960s, scientists have converged on the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire to explore how forest ecosystems work.

Mosquitoes and environmental justice

West Baltimore residents contend with more mosquitoes than people living in more affluent parts of the city, putting them at increased risk for mosquito-borne diseases.

Imported forest pests the greatest threat to U.S. Trees

When asked ‘what’s the greatest threat facing U.S. trees,’ common answers are climate change and development. 

The Tick Project

The Cary Institute has embarked on an ambitious study that will test environmental interventions with the potential to reduce tick-borne disease in neighborhoods. The goal: to lower Lyme disease rates and protect public health. 

Supporters corner

Friends turned out for the Ned Ames Honorary Reception and Lecture on June 24. This year’s speaker, President Emeritus Dr. Gene E. Likens, spoke about lessons learned from 50 years of research at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest.

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

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