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Science and Management Forums: A regional resource

The Science and Management Forum series has been well received by its target audience. 

Cary Conference 2011

The Cary Institute hosted the 13th Cary Conference, "Linking Ecology and Ethics for a Changing World: Values, Philosophy, and Action." 

Writer in residence Akiko Busch

In May 2011, writer Akiko Busch was the Institute's inaugural writer-in-residence. 

Biodiversity protects human health

We can best preserve biodiversity by preserving habitat. 

HRECOS walkway installation

HRECOS observations not only protect a national treasure, they inform decisions about commercial traffic and management. 

Weathers spends year as NSF program director

From April 2009 through June 2010, biogeochemist Dr. Kathleen Weathers was on loan from the Cary Institute. 

Cary road salt report generates regional buzz

Last winter, between 10 and 20 million tons of salt were used nationally. 

From our President

It's been wonderful to see the Cary Institute expand its role as a resource for regional environmental programming. 

The earth's climate continues to warm

The growing season is getting longer. 

Aldo Leopold Society Autumn Celebration 2010

The Aldo Leopold Society's annual celebration was held at the Widdowson's Temple Farm in Millbrook. 

Turning Forests into Fuel: Report Outlines Promise and Limits of Biomass Energy in the Northeast

Forest biomass could replace as much as one quarter of the liquid fossil fuel now being used for industrial and commercial heating in the Northeastern United States.

Turning forests into fuel

Our forests provide a wide range of ecological, economic, and aesthetic benefits.

My water comes from the Hudson River

A place-based curricula developed by Cary educators engages students in their local water cycle and teaches them how human activities and land-use can affect that cycle.

Ecological research in urban setting requires innovative methods

While most ecologists conduct field work in natural settings, Cary Institute scientists have pioneered the inclusion of urban and suburban landscapes in ecological research.

Biogeochemistry: Crucial to solving environmental problems

The Gulf of Mexico is home to a dead zone roughly the size of New Jersey. Inhospitable waters are caused by excess nitrogen that originates from distant Mid- western agribusinesses.  

Nurturing ecological understandIng

During the summer months, the Cary Institute’s campus bustles with educational activity. From campers getting their first introduction to climate change while exploring our property, to undergraduates conducting research projects under the mentorship of Cary Institute scientists—our staff is committed to nurturing ecological understanding in learners of all ages. 

Small wetlands support bIodiversity and freshwater resources

In early spring, shortly after the snow melts, vernal pools dot the landscape. Isolated from larger water bodies, these small wetlands are usually only wet for a few months out of the year. If you are not paying attention, you just might miss them. And that would be a shame, because these oft-overlooked wetlands are valuable and interesting ecosystems.

Tracking the spread of ecological pests

Cary Institute ecologist Dr. Shannon L. LaDeau is working to understand how environmental conditions influence the spread of undesirable pests and pathogens such as West Nile virus and the hemlock wooly adelgid. This work includes understanding the dynamics of pest communities and taking into account things like land use, climate change, and combined stressors.

Cary Institute president advises Al Gore on climate change

Cary Institute President Bill Schlesinger participated in a roundtable discussion with Former Vice President Al Gore in New York City in mid-January.

Summer institute for teachers

Teacher training can infuse classrooms with current scientific thinking. When teachers are confident and engaged in new concepts, students benefit.

Policymakers urged to adopt biofuel standards

Cellulose-based biofuels hold promise, but we need to proceed cautiously. 

The mussel in the rainforest

This past summer, we unexpectedly found a very rare freshwater mussel in one of the small tributaries of the Housatonic River basin – a species that hadn’t been seen in the region since 1843.

Farms, fish, and nitrogen pollution

How is the fish on your dinner plate tied to agricultural fertilizer? Let’s use the ecosystem approach to think about the big picture. On land, nitrogen-rich fertilizer is applied to crops to stimulate production. 

Today's science, tomorrow's solution: embracing a new name and a strategic plan

Change is underway at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies. For over two decades, the Cary Institute has been at the forefront of ecological research. Now, in an effort to maximize the organization’s influence on environmental policy, it’s embracing solution-driven science and enhanced outreach.

Notes from the field: Lessons from the city

As the Director of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES), a Long Term Ecological Research project, I work with colleagues to reveal how watersheds can be used to understand interactions among social, biophysical, and built environments.

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