Newsroom

Week highlights invasives among us

Invasive species typically are referred to as those moved from their native range by human activity and, having established themselves in the wilds of the new place, cause ecological or economic harm.

World of species right here on the Hudson

If you want to see plants and animals from around the world, you don’t have to go to the zoo or botanical garden — just visit the Hudson River. When you get out of your car, you see common reed (phragmites), false-indigo and purple loosestrife growing along the edges of the parking lot.

Introduced species wreak harm in new habitat

If you pay attention to plants, you already know non-native species are commonplace. Queen Anne's lace, chicory and garlic mustard — familiar sights along our roads — are just a handful of the species brought to the U.S. for medicinal or edible purposes.

Decades of Hudson River data show the flow of time

Most research projects on the Hudson River look at a snapshot of time: a spring, a summer, a year or two. But the Hudson, like other rivers, is constantly changing.

blacklegged tick

Study finds one tick bite can deliver multiple infections

Podcast
A new study in New York reveals that ticks are more likely to be infected with several pathogens, not just the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. The ticks for the study were collected from Dutchess County.

tick

Single tick bite can pack double pathogen punch

People who get bitten by a blacklegged tick have a higher-than-expected chance of being exposed to more than one pathogen at the same time.

Scientists nationwide call on EPA to create scientifically strong pollution standards for biomass energy

Ninety one researchers from institutions across the country have signed a letter urging the EPA to follow the latest science on climate impacts from Biomass Energy.

On biomass, EPA should follow the science

In America's Southeastern states, there's a booming energy trend that's as big a step backward as imaginable.

Cary's Weathers lectures on fog

Biogeochemist Kathleen Weathers studies the chemicals and living organisms in fog or mist. Illuminating the chemical relationships among water, land, forests and the ocean increases our understanding of the ecological importance of fog and air pollution.

'Morphing' Hudson begs for more study

We've all heard the expression, "Think global, act local." In the environmental context, its popularity no doubt comes from a sense of reassurance — that by taking small, personal steps, we can make a difference.

Biodiversity offsets: risks, opportunities and the contribution of ecological engineering

A terrestrial ecologist at Cary, Clive Jones' work focuses on the concept of organisms that help to engineer the ecosystem. He talks about the relationship between ecological engineering and ecological compensation. 

Study documents Hudson River ecosystem changes over 25 years

The Hudson River includes a stretch where tides affect the river as much at its mouth near Manhattan as 150 miles inland at Troy, N.Y. Most of that section is freshwater, and the strong tidal currents keep it mixed from top to bottom despite its depth.

Cary Institute to study Lyme's effect on mice

Fresh off of a study that showed mice don't die any quicker as uninfected ticks pile onto them, the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies is launching research that will examine how mice fare after they get Lyme disease.

Hudson Data Jam Awards Showcase features creative work by regional students

The public is invited to attend the first-ever Hudson Data Jam Awards Showcase. Support regional students while learning about the Hudson River in this unique event that combines river science and data interpretation with creative communication.

NY carbon goals among the most ambitious

For New York to achieve its goals in the Obama administration's plan to reduce carbon emission from power plants, the state will have to do more than cut back on dirty fuel

Is climate change to thank for dramatic recovery of acid rain's 'canary in the coal mine'?

There’s a dramatic recovery underway in New England. Red spruce, a tree species that researchers thought was doomed because of acid rain, is now growing faster than ever, and it’s not the only tree growing like gangbusters.

A crash course in urban watersheds

Urban waterways have been channeled, diverted, buried and polluted for centuries, but they have only recently been studied as part of the larger urban ecosystem.

Rolling old river is indeed changing

The Hudson River has changed in many far-reaching ways over the past quarter-century as a result of human activity. Zebra mussels and other invasive species have changed the river's ecology.

New York is a hotbed for damaging forest pests

When Chris Standley received a tip that some ash trees within the Mohonk Preserve might be infested by a devastating insect, he grabbed a drawknife and peeled away the bark.

Dirty and Dangerous

Small, autonomous airboats masquerading as crocodiles gathered data on hippo hygiene and water quality this spring in Kenya. Cary's Emma Rosi-Marshall was there.

Poop-hunting crocodile robot dodges hippo ... for science!

Video
Sending a robotic airboat disguised as a crocodile to look for hippo poop in Kenya's Mara River sounds like a hilarious idea, but it wasn't so funny when the hippopotamus started chasing the robot.

An interview with Cary guest lecturer Sir Peter Crane

Robin Hood Radio interviews botanist Sir Peter Crane about his Cary Institute lecture Ginkgo: The Tree That Time Forgot. Crane explores the history of the ginkgo from its mysterious origin through its proliferation, drastic decline, and ultimate resurgence.

New Science Policy Exchange Project: Forest Pests and Pathogens

The Harvard Forest, in collaboration with the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, has launched a new Science Policy Exchange project on forest pests and pathogens. This project addresses growing concerns about damage to trees, forests, and local economies caused by introduced insects. 

Lyme Disease: Ten things you always wanted to know about ticks...

To find out how to steer clear of Lyme disease during "picnic season" - a time when people are more likely to pick up ticks - the National Science Foundation spoke with NSF-funded disease ecologist Rick Ostfeld of the Cary Institute.

Lyme disease season approaches, but it's still too early to tell how the cold winter affected ticks

With the snow melted and the weather warming, folks are finally making their way outdoors, where, if you live anywhere in the Hudson Valley, the black-footed tick that carries Lyme disease can be found.

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