Newsroom

Hudson Data Jam receives grant, partners with Spark Media

The Cary Institute has received $158,549 from the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation's Hudson River Estuary Grant Program. Funding will support the Hudson Data Jam, an annual competition that melds science, data, and creative expression – with the goal of increasing environmental awareness among students and the community.

Boom-or-Bust Breeding Cycle That Helps the Mighty Oak Survive

While deer are often associated with ticks that carry Lyme disease, the ruminants don’t transmit the infection. Mice do, and when they flourish, the disease will proliferate.

Q&A: Saving the city with Urban Ecology

Preserving the environment is often seen as a battle of development versus nature. But in America today, roughly three-fourths of us live in metropolitan areas. To preserve our health and the planet's health, we need to create something new: A sustainable city.

One of the largest ‘test tubes’ in science is an 8,000-acre forest in New Hampshire

Podcast

The White Mountains of New Hampshire contain an unusual patch of woods known as the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest. Hubbard Brook has been home to some of the past half-century’s biggest discoveries in forest science, particularly around acid rain and clear-cutting. 

A hotspot for a new pandemic? Computer models pinpoint Nebraska

Podcast

A surprising computer-based study highlights Nebraska and Kansas as possible “hotspots” for mammals carrying viruses with the potential to infect human populations.

Star Trek-style device could help spot 'rogue' genetically modified organisms in the environment

Eco-warriors could soon get a sci-fi boost in the form of a handheld device for spotting rogue genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

traffic circle

You can fight climate change in small spaces too

When we think of nature in cities, we often think about major green expanses, places like Central Park in New York City or Griffith Park in Los Angeles. But in these cities and others, little patches of greenery — sometimes forgotten, often overlooked — can be very important for the local environment.

Chris Solomon, freshwater ecologist, joins the Cary institute

Chris Solomon is the newest addition to the Cary Institute’s scientific staff. 

Strayer and Jones retirement

June 31 marked the retirement of two longstanding members of the Cary Institute’s scientific staff.

Kathie Weathers Hutchinson Chair

Senior Scientist Kathie Weathers was recently named the G. Evelyn Hutchinson Chair in Ecology, in recognition of her achievements advancing freshwater science. 

Supporters corner

Friends turned out for the Ned Ames Honorary Reception and Lecture on June 24. This year’s speaker, President Emeritus Dr. Gene E. Likens, spoke about lessons learned from 50 years of research at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest.

The Tick Project

The Cary Institute has embarked on an ambitious study that will test environmental interventions with the potential to reduce tick-borne disease in neighborhoods. The goal: to lower Lyme disease rates and protect public health. 

From our President

Understanding the ecology of infectious diseases is critical to protecting public health. In the U.S., tick-borne diseases are becoming more prevalent thanks, in part, to climate change. 

Imported forest pests the greatest threat to U.S. Trees

When asked ‘what’s the greatest threat facing U.S. trees,’ common answers are climate change and development. 

Mosquitoes and environmental justice

West Baltimore residents contend with more mosquitoes than people living in more affluent parts of the city, putting them at increased risk for mosquito-borne diseases.

Lessons from the forest

Since the 1960s, scientists have converged on the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire to explore how forest ecosystems work.

Former Cary President urges adherence to Paris Accord

Podcast

A former president of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Dutchess County is one of 375 members of the National Academy of Sciences who has signed an open letter to draw attention to the perils of climate change.

How to prevent the next emerald ash borer

The emerald ash borer, a beetle native to Asia, is presently established around Concord, N.H., and can be expected to eliminate ash trees from most of New England within a decade. 

Temperate zone? Not so much

Whoever named the "temperate zone" must have had a sense of humor. I'm writing this during a week of humid, 90-degree days, and just a few months ago it was 13 below, a stiff north wind providing the icing on that frozen cake. Since then, we've had rain, snow, sleet, warm spells, cold snaps and thunderstorms.

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How amphetamine use may be affecting our waterways

New research has added to the growing body of evidence that the chemicals we put in our bodies often end up in our waterways — with noticeable consequences. 

Your drain on drugs: Meth seeps into Baltimore's streams

You shouldn't put illegal drugs in your body, and you shouldn't let neighborhood bodies of water ingest them, either. A new study suggests that aquatic life in Baltimore is being exposed to drugs, and it's having an impact.

Ecological consequences of amphetamine pollution in urban streams

Pharmaceutical and illicit drugs are present in streams in Baltimore, Maryland. At some sites, amphetamine concentrations are high enough to alter the base of the aquatic food web. 

Tick study gets 'astonishing' local response

When the scientists behind an ambitious tick study began their work in April, they did not know how many Dutchess County families would be willing to grant access to their properties and personal health information.

Junk food fight: Science tests how birds compete for Cheetos

It's the early bird that gets the Cheetos. But it's the bigger bird that steals it away.

Behavioral ecologist Rhea Esposito used the snack food to see how two types of smart birds— smaller magpies and bigger crows — interact and compete for food.

Ecology on the Runway

Ecologists put on an unconventional fashion show at the annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America (ESA) in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Each showcased a custom-made garment that artistically depicted his or her own field of research, the organism or environment to which they’d devoted their life and careers — their hearts on their sleeves.

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