Newsroom

Toxic algae can put water sources at risk

Perhaps this summer’s most ironic story was the news that residents of Toledo, Ohio, a city on the shores of one of the largest and most magnificent lakes in the world, had no water to drink. 

Ecologists optimistic about power to change

I often hear that ecologists should stop being so gloomy. After all, the world isn’t coming to an end — the sky is still blue, the grass is still green and the birds are still singing.

Discover our grounds

Looking to commune with nature? One of the Hudson Valley’s best kept secrets is the Cary Institute’s 2,000-acre campus.

Hudson Data Jam

For more than thirty years, our researchers have been studying the Hudson River and its watershed, analyzing everything from water chemistry to invasive species. That vast data set was the inspiration for a new offering by our Education Program.

Welcoming Barbara Han

Join us in welcoming Dr. Barbara Han, the newest addition to the Cary Institute’s growing infectious disease ecology team.

An interview with Jon Cole

Cary Institute biogeochemist Dr. Jonathan Cole recently received one of the highest distinctions a scientist can achieve: election into the National Academy of Sciences. The honor recognizes his distinguished career in limnology, the study of lakes, rivers, and other inland waters.

A pulse on Africa's Mara River

Cary Institute scientist Dr. Emma Rosi-Marshall is working with colleagues at Yale University to understand how wildlife impacts the Mara River. Degraded waters have been linked to typhoid and cholera outbreaks, as well as fish kills.

Cary Institute appoints new president

Following a distinguished career at the Wildlife Conservation Society, Dr. Joshua Ginsberg will assume the role of president of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies this fall.

Four facts about tick-borne illness

Cary Institute scientists have been investigating the ecology of Lyme disease and other tick-borne ailments for more than 20 years. Here are some important tick facts to remember this summer.

From our President

This is my last letter in Ecofocus, as I will be retiring from the Cary Institute this summer. Our seven years in Millbrook have gone incredibly fast, and Lisa and I have certainly enjoyed our time here.

Supporters Corner: Aldo Leopold Society

Nearly 100 members of the Aldo Leopold Society attended the Ned Ames Honorary Lecture on April 25 featuring Bill Schlesinger’s last official presentation, “If I had a Hammer.” 

Acid rain: what it takes to stop pollution

pH levels, a measure of acidity, are improving in the Adirondacks. Now, when the state stocks fish in many lakes, they survive, and even thrive, to the joy of fishermen who found the 1970s and '80s depressing. It's a remarkable turnaround in since acid rain's discovery in the U.S. by Gene Likens, just a half century ago.

Acid rain aftermath: damaged ecology, damaged politics

Since the bad old days of the 1970s and '80s, there has been a whole lot less acid falling on the Northeast. That’s mostly thanks to the 1990 Clean Air Act, which has made a big difference to lakes and streams.

Cary mourns loss of trustee and friend

A long-time friend of the Cary Institute as well as Honorary Trustee and past Chairman of the Board, Dr. Paul Risser passed away last Thursday, July 10.

Peter Groffman elected LTER Chair

At its most recent meeting, the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Science Council elected nicrobial ecologist Peter Groffman the new Chair.

Week highlights invasives among us

Invasive species typically are referred to as those moved from their native range by human activity and, having established themselves in the wilds of the new place, cause ecological or economic harm.

World of species right here on the Hudson

If you want to see plants and animals from around the world, you don’t have to go to the zoo or botanical garden — just visit the Hudson River. When you get out of your car, you see common reed (phragmites), false-indigo and purple loosestrife growing along the edges of the parking lot.

Introduced species wreak harm in new habitat

If you pay attention to plants, you already know non-native species are commonplace. Queen Anne's lace, chicory and garlic mustard — familiar sights along our roads — are just a handful of the species brought to the U.S. for medicinal or edible purposes.

Decades of Hudson River data show the flow of time

Most research projects on the Hudson River look at a snapshot of time: a spring, a summer, a year or two. But the Hudson, like other rivers, is constantly changing.

blacklegged tick

Study finds one tick bite can deliver multiple infections

Podcast
A new study in New York reveals that ticks are more likely to be infected with several pathogens, not just the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. The ticks for the study were collected from Dutchess County.

tick

Single tick bite can pack double pathogen punch

People who get bitten by a blacklegged tick have a higher-than-expected chance of being exposed to more than one pathogen at the same time.

Scientists nationwide call on EPA to create scientifically strong pollution standards for biomass energy

Ninety one researchers from institutions across the country have signed a letter urging the EPA to follow the latest science on climate impacts from Biomass Energy.

On biomass, EPA should follow the science

In America's Southeastern states, there's a booming energy trend that's as big a step backward as imaginable.

Cary's Weathers lectures on fog

Biogeochemist Kathleen Weathers studies the chemicals and living organisms in fog or mist. Illuminating the chemical relationships among water, land, forests and the ocean increases our understanding of the ecological importance of fog and air pollution.

'Morphing' Hudson begs for more study

We've all heard the expression, "Think global, act local." In the environmental context, its popularity no doubt comes from a sense of reassurance — that by taking small, personal steps, we can make a difference.

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