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emerald ash borer

Ash tree faces die-off as Asian pest spreads

As you drive around Dutchess County this fall, try to get a look at the dusky yellows and purples of the ash trees, because they won't be around much longer.

My water comes from the Hudson River

A place-based curricula developed by Cary educators engages students in their local water cycle and teaches them how human activities and land-use can affect that cycle.

Ecological research in urban setting requires innovative methods

While most ecologists conduct field work in natural settings, Cary Institute scientists have pioneered the inclusion of urban and suburban landscapes in ecological research.

Turning forests into fuel

Our forests provide a wide range of ecological, economic, and aesthetic benefits.

hudson river

Land-use plans will benefit region

Thanks to the efforts of committed environmental groups, government organizations and individuals, the Hudson Valley is poised to position itself as a model for melding environmental and economic interests.

rock snot

Rock snot growing in New York rivers

As we approach the cold and flu season, a few of our nearby streams and rivers are just now getting over some serious congestion.

Hydraulic fracturing poses risks to us, ecosystems

The issue of hydraulic fracturing to extract natural gas from deep shale deposits has become increasingly difficult to ignore.

Problems point to oil's impact

Oil: We're running out of it. It makes our country vulnerable to foreign powers. Burning it causes irreversible harm to our environment.

West Nile virus alters ecological balance

West Nile virus is a human health risk because it can cause sickness and death when mosquitoes transmit the pathogen from an infected bird to a person.

lake

Take a moment to savor the age of 300 million ponds, lakes

If you ran a tourist agency for time-travelling, intergalactic visitors, what attractions do you think would bring aliens to Earth in 2010?

Water cycle runs on a local level

When we think about the water cycle, most of us remember the diagram we were taught in third grade.

hudson river shoreline

Shorelines: Where people meet their river

When we see where the water meets the land, how many of us have considered how different types of shorelines influence the plants and animals residing in the river?

mosquito

Hardy mosquitoes defy humans, shape course of history

The joy in seeing the first flowers of spring is always countered by dismay over the reappearance of mosquitoes

students

Cary Institute's hands-on science teaches thinking

A class of second-graders at St. Joseph School, Millbrook, gathers around a study plot in the grass of their schoolyard, marked by four pink flags in the shape of a square. 

It's time to remember to protect fish population

Losses of our local fish have been so severe that the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has completely closed commercial and recreational fishing for American shad in the Hudson River.

Volcanoes may help to cool the Earth

A volcano erupts in Iceland, and cinders and sulfur dioxide are spewed into the atmosphere. 

Ice-out records track climate change

We identify the seasons through changes in biological and physical phenomena such as flowering, breeding or animal migration that mark an expected break in the pace of nature.

Even for city folks, ecology begins at home

When I was 13 years old, and supportive adults asked what I wanted to be when I grew up, I would enthusiastically blurt out, "I want to be an ecologist!"

Cows can help with upkeep of ski trails

Some French colleagues of mine recently discovered if you take cows up to the alpine pastures along the ski trails during or just after rain, they, not surprisingly, leave hoof prints.

Biodiversity and human health: Why more species mean fewer cases of Lyme disease

The United Nations has proclaimed 2010 to be the International Year of Biodiversity. 

Our river on drugs

Modern life is filled with an amazing assortment of chemicals. 

Manage pathways to block invasive species

Willie Nelson once sang that he only missed his ex-lover on three days: yesterday, today and tomorrow. This simple division of time works as well for invasive species as it does for heartbreak.

Thinking about climate change during the winter

When people think about climate change, the first thing that usually comes to mind is blazing hot summer days, severe droughts, or super-size hurricanes. But climate change is actually more significant in winter than in summer.

Breathing lessons: Living without oxygen

Most of us learned in school that plants produce oxygen and consume carbon dioxide, while animals (like us) consume organic matter (such as carrots and burritos) and oxygen and produce carbon dioxide.

Global warming is real - despite email hoax

The recent hacking of e-mails at the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia Center — one of the world's foremost institutions for the study of climate change — offers a disconcerting view of how modern science is done. 

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