Newsroom

Economic downturn could hurt your health

Dengue (pronounced DEN-ghee) fever is caused by a virus spread by mosquitoes. It was formerly called "break-bone fever" because it causes excruciating pain to the muscles and joints of its human victims.

Keeping balance in the environment

We tend to think of nature as having reliable patterns; the leaves turn color each autumn, seasonal birds come and go. But there are also examples of sudden, unexpected changes in the environment around us.

Gauging growing season

Farmers and biologists typically consider the growing season in our region to run from March to September, although this may change as temperatures increase with climate change.

Local scientists aided Nobel-winning panel

Last year, we received certificates that featured attractive artwork, Alfred Nobel's name, and the King of Norway's signature. No, we didn't win the Nobel Peace Prize. But in 2007, our scientific contributions did help Al Gore and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change win theirs.

Policymakers urged to adopt biofuel standards

Cellulose-based biofuels hold promise, but we need to proceed cautiously. 

Summer institute for teachers

Teacher training can infuse classrooms with current scientific thinking. When teachers are confident and engaged in new concepts, students benefit.

Institute helps teachers deepen their knowledge of ecosystems

Teacher training can help infuse classrooms with current scientific thinking. When teachers are confident and engaged in new concepts, students benefit

Tiny organisms critical to life processes

What do cheese production, sewage treatment, and insect-resistant corn have in common? Without microbes, none of these things would be possible

Fungi assist in decomposition, team with plants to boost absorption

In late summer, after a couple of rainy afternoons, I happened to see several huge mushrooms under a pine tree at the Cary Institute. Mushrooms can be a little deceptive because they appear so suddenly, often seemingly overnight

Why you should care about ozone warnings

From Beijing to Beacon, air pollution alerts are rampant this summer. One of the primary causes for these alerts is high levels of "bad" ozone.

Airborne pollutants harm diverse habitats

If you are living in the eastern United States, the environment around you is being harmed by air pollution.

Observation network to help study Hudson River estuary

A collaborative monitoring project called the Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System has been implemented to provide continuous real-time data about estuary conditions in the Hudson River such as temperature, salinity, and pollutant loads.

The Army Corps of Engineers vs. muskrat engineers: Nature declared winner

Muskrats have caused levee collapses in the past and will likely do so in the future.

Let lawn go - and reap the benefits

Today's obsession with perfect, park-like lawns is not only a waste of time and money; it's bad for the environment. Embrace a natural yard, as our household has done on about half of our property.

Puffins' habits change habitat

In 1890, there were about 250,000 pairs of Atlantic puffins breeding on Grassholm, a 22-acre island a few miles off the southwest coast of Wales in the United Kingdom. By 1940, there were only 25 breeding pairs

The mussel in the rainforest

This past summer, we unexpectedly found a very rare freshwater mussel in one of the small tributaries of the Housatonic River basin – a species that hadn’t been seen in the region since 1843.

Is spring coming sooner?

This year, our maples and oaks put out new leaves, and our fruit trees started blooming about two weeks earlier than usual. Is this a symptom of climate change?

forest fire

Fire factor fading

A fire in Minnewaska State Park, which burned more than 3,000 acres, is a reminder of how difficult it can be to control wildfires.

Thorny shrub is a backyard bully

My backyard is being devoured by a silent but aggressive invader, multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora). This thorny perennial shrub is an Asian import with arching green stems called canes that can reach 10-15 feet long.

Subtle cues spur awakening

As spring settles in around us, there is a lot of evidence of how organisms and the ecosystems they are part of respond to the shifts in the seasons.

Notes from the field: Lessons from the city

As the Director of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES), a Long Term Ecological Research project, I work with colleagues to reveal how watersheds can be used to understand interactions among social, biophysical, and built environments.

Is biofuel sustainable?

Simply defined, sustainability is ensuring that future generations have access to the resources that we enjoy today. It was the topic of a recent workshop at the Cary Institute, where over forty ecologists discussed the sustainability of biofuel, an emerging source of alternative energy.

Farms, fish, and nitrogen pollution

How is the fish on your dinner plate tied to agricultural fertilizer? Let’s use the ecosystem approach to think about the big picture. On land, nitrogen-rich fertilizer is applied to crops to stimulate production. 

Today's science, tomorrow's solution: embracing a new name and a strategic plan

Change is underway at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies. For over two decades, the Cary Institute has been at the forefront of ecological research. Now, in an effort to maximize the organization’s influence on environmental policy, it’s embracing solution-driven science and enhanced outreach.

Chinese mitten crabs: Invasive species found in Hudson

Look for a new animal in the Hudson this summer. The Chinese mitten crab is at our doorstep.

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