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white-footed mouse

Study says mice are super hosts of Lyme ticks

While bloodsucking ticks can lay waste to a moose and infect humans with devastating diseases, the tiny parasites and the bacteria they carry have no apparent effect on one wee woodland creature: the white-footed mouse.

forest and lake in New York

Caring for the land: Cary Institute and Dutchess Land Conservancy to host special forum

Interested in protecting and promoting healthy forests and open spaces, now and for future generations? Learn how science-based stewardship can keep Hudson Valley landscapes vital.

mussels in pipe

Don't move a mussel (or a clam, or a snail)

Anyone that has spent time at a seaside pier has witnessed the destruction barnacles wreak on boat hulls. But biofouling animals are not limited to marine environments

Aedes aegypti

As climate change alters ecosystems, scientists worry that exotic diseases will spread

Another public health challenge the National Climate Assessment will explore is the likelihood that diseases native to other geographical areas will migrate to the United States as climate changes alter ecosystems.

Cary Institute debuts student competition with a focus on Hudson River science and creativity

Cary Institute educators are challenging middle school and high school students to creatively bring  long-term river data to life in the Hudson Data Jam, a new competition that melds science and creativity.

mouse tagging

Mice give ticks a free lunch

People living in northern and central parts of the U.S. are more likely to contract Lyme disease and other tick-borne ailments when white-footed mice are abundant. Mice are effective at transferring disease-causing pathogens to feeding ticks.

mouse tagged

Ticks don't harm mice, study finds, meaning Lyme threat is not decreased

When researchers at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies began a recent study, they wanted to know the answer to a simple question: What effect do ticks have on the health of mice?

Soil in spring

It's March. But the hard crust of snow on the ground is hanging around -- it's been too cold for it to go. A few days before spring, and the world still looks mostly frozen.

Stately sycamores are more beautiful than utilitarian

I always have a hard time choosing my favorite tree, but today I think it must be the sycamore. When I see the winter sunlight shining on their lovely white trunks and arms, all flecked with tan and brown and olive, it’s hard to think of a more beautiful tree.

sprinkler and fertilizer

National study reveals urban lawn care habits

What do people living in Boston, Baltimore, Miami, Minneapolis, Phoenix, and Los Angeles have in common? From coast to coast, prairie to desert – residential lawns reign.

Capitol Hill briefing: Climate change and infectious disease

Audio
Speakers: Richard Ostfeld and George Luber

Topics covered include the controversy over whether climate change will increase the burden of infectious disease with a focus on malaria and other mosquito-transmitted diseases.

What 2013's weather means in the long run

For more than 30 years, the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook has collected information about local weather conditions. Equipment used to monitor acid rain was installed in 1983 and has provided continuous insight into rain and snow data.

Saline solution: When de-icing roads, we may want to pass on the salt

It's no secret that Americans love salt. But our uses for it extend well beyond the kitchen: It turns out we dump so much of the stuff on our roads that a lot of it ends up in our freshwater rivers and streams. Thanks again polar vortex.

Breaking the transmission cycle of Lyme disease

What if we could vaccinate the white-footed mice that account for the majority of the transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi (the cause of Lyme disease) and significantly reduce the level of tick infection?

How the spreading symptoms of climate change can be deadly

The hallmarks of a warming climate, heavier rains, more severe droughts, rising sea levels and longer growing seasons, are spreading a variety of pathogens throughout the world.

Africa: Freshwater atlas to help nations conserve biodiversity

An online repository of maps has been launched to make information on freshwater biodiversity available on a common platform for use by scientists, policymakers, conservationists and NGOs.

Emptying the Skies documentary — screening at the Cary Institute

On Friday, February 21 at 7 p.m. join the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies for a free screening of Emptying the Skies, a documentary film about the widespread poaching of migratory songbirds in the Mediterranean and the heroism of a team of Italian bird-lovers trying to put an end to the practice.

Why pickle brine is a secret weapon against ice

This extremely icy and snowy winter has brought renewed attention to the question: What's the best (and most environmentally kind) way to melt it all? Salt, chemicals ... or pickle brine?

Lyme disease: Freezes may reduce ticks

A 2012 study co-authored by Cary Disease Ecologist Rick Ostfeld examined the probability of tick mortality in winter conditions in Millbrook and Syracuse.

Study questions link between increases in Lyme disease and deer

We often blame white-tailed deer and the deer ticks they carry for spreading Lyme disease in the United States, especially from Minnesota to New England to Northern Virginia.

An interview with Cary guest lecturer Alan Weisman

Podcast
NPR station interviews investigative journalist Alan Weisman.

"Antibacterial" soaps don't work, are bad for humans & the environment

On December 16, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a proposed rule that allows soap and hygiene product manufacturers one year to prove "antibacterial" additives are safe and effective.

Dengue fever: Another formidable World Cup opponent

Brazil is a hot spot for dengue fever, a mosquito-transmitted virus that lacks a vaccine or treatment. The nation's 573 dengue deaths in 2013 through Nov. 20 is nearly double the 2012 toll.

Diseases on the move because of climate change

Warming temperatures and increased extreme weather events such as drought, rainstorms and flooding, contribute to the nation's changing disease map, experts say. USA Today reports on this trend and how it has impacted the spread of various diseases including tick-borne illnesses.

When antibacterials go down the drain

Triclosan – a synthetic antibacterial – is driving the development of resistant bacteria in streams and rivers, with urban sites most impacted. So reports a recent study by the Cary Institute’s Emma Rosi-Marshall.

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