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Real-Time Hudson River data Is displayed on Walkway Over The Hudson

A pedestrian bridge in New York has a new sign unveiled this week featuring real-time data about the Hudson River. Officials say the information will provide some useful facts to visitors while scientists monitor the river’s changing conditions.

Walkway sign monitors river in real time, keeps visitors informed

Environmentalists often lament that the things they seek to protect can't speak for themselves. But for the Hudson River, that's not true anymore.

New Walkway Over the Hudson sign explores river science in action

Each year, some half a million visitors explore the Walkway over the Hudson, a steel cantilever bridge that was converted into the nation's largest footbridge in 2009. And now, thanks to a new digital sign, visitors will be able to access real-time information about the river's environmental conditions.

Super-bacteria breeding in city streams

A recent study found antibiotic-resistant bacteria flourishing in Chicago's urban creeks and rivers at more than double the rates of woodland waterways.

The global search for education: Prevention - ticks

Given the 300,000 new cases of Lyme disease a year in the US reported by the CDC, it is understandable that health organizations and local governments in this country are extremely anxious to develop a broader, more effective tick-borne diseases control strategy.

Antibacterial products fuel resistant bacteria in streams and rivers

Triclosan – a synthetic antibacterial widely used in personal care products – is fueling the development of resistant bacteria in streams and rivers.

Cary scientists study simulated streams

In a converted greenhouse off of Route 82, scientists at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies are planning to contaminate streams.Fortunately, those streams are in 20 fiberglass tubs at the institute's new Artificial Stream Facility.

'Rivers on Rolaids': How acid rain is changing waterways

Something peculiar is happening to rivers and streams in large parts of the United States — the water's chemistry is changing. Scientists have found dozens of waterways that are becoming more alkaline.

Calculating the true cost of a ton of mountaintop coal

To meet current U.S. coal demand through surface mining, an area of the Central Appalachians the size of Washington, D.C., would need to be mined every 81 days.

50 years after its discovery, acid rain has lessons for climate change

In the 1980s, the dying red spruce trees of New England—many of them taller than eight-story buildings and more than three centuries old—furnished frightening proof of the power of acid rain.

Researchers find acid rain legacy impacts Eastern waters

Podcast
WAMC reports on the long-term impacts of acid rain.

Eastern U.S. water supplies threatened by a legacy of acid rain

Millbrook, NY – Human activities are changing the water chemistry of many streams and rivers in the Eastern U.S., with consequences for water supplies and aquatic life, so reports a new study in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

More tickborne diseases other than Lyme. Maybe just don’t go outside.

Some tick-borne diseases are just becoming known and thus are often not recognized by physicians.

CDC study focuses on spraying pesticides and tick-borne diseases

Podcast
A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looks at whether spraying yards with pesticides reduces the risk of contracting a tick-borne disease.

Dams destabilize river food webs: Lessons from the Grand Canyon

Managing fish in human-altered rivers is a challenge because their food webs are sensitive to environmental disturbance. So reports a new study in the journal Ecological Monographs, based on an exhaustive three-year analysis of the Colorado River in Glen and Grand Canyons.

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