Newsroom

Calculating the true cost of a ton of mountaintop coal

To meet current U.S. coal demand through surface mining, an area of the Central Appalachians the size of Washington, D.C., would need to be mined every 81 days.

50 years after its discovery, acid rain has lessons for climate change

In the 1980s, the dying red spruce trees of New England—many of them taller than eight-story buildings and more than three centuries old—furnished frightening proof of the power of acid rain.

Researchers find acid rain legacy impacts Eastern waters

Podcast
WAMC reports on the long-term impacts of acid rain.

Eastern U.S. water supplies threatened by a legacy of acid rain

Human activities are changing the water chemistry of many streams and rivers in the Eastern U.S., with consequences for water supplies and aquatic life, so reports a new study in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

More tickborne diseases other than Lyme. Maybe just don’t go outside.

Some tick-borne diseases are just becoming known and thus are often not recognized by physicians.

CDC study focuses on spraying pesticides and tick-borne diseases

Podcast
A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looks at whether spraying yards with pesticides reduces the risk of contracting a tick-borne disease.

Dams destabilize river food webs: Lessons from the Grand Canyon

Managing fish in human-altered rivers is a challenge because their food webs are sensitive to environmental disturbance. So reports a new study in the journal Ecological Monographs, based on an exhaustive three-year analysis of the Colorado River in Glen and Grand Canyons.

Teens get involved with nature

Michael Meaden is a hands-on, outdoor teen. As a youngster, he enjoyed outdoor youth camps at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook. But then the 14-year-old outgrew the camps. Fortunately, last year a new teen program was added to the youth camps: Eco-Investigator, for rising eighth- through 10th-graders.

Undergraduate students present research findings at Cary Institute

Join the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies for the 26th Annual Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Symposium, where eleven students will present the results of their summer research projects.

Hubbard Brook 50th anniversary celebrated by local scientists

Dr. Gene E. Likens, the Founding President of Millbrook's Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, recently celebrated 50 years of research at The Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES) in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

Why does your yard look the same as every other yard?

Since 2011, scientists have been exploring people’s yards in six U.S. metropolitan areas–Los Angeles, Phoenix, Boston, Miami, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and Baltimore.

Climate change affects disease spread: The need to forecast

As our climate shifts and changes, wildlife and weather also shifts and changes. Now, researchers have found something else that's deviating from the norm.

Tick-borne virus risk increases

While extremely rare, Powassan virus is deadlier than other tick-borne illnesses — killing 30 percent of those infected statewide since 2004 — and its victims are infected much more quickly.

Study highlights need to forecast how climate is impacting disease risk

Climate change is affecting the spread of infectious diseases worldwide, according to an international team of leading disease ecologists.

veery

Veeries very quiet when owls are about

Cary visiting scientist Ken Schmidt and his research team have been studying the ecology and behavior of birds on the Cary Institute grounds since 1998.

west nile

West Nile virus scant in mosquitoes in Allegheny County this summer

Mosquitoes testing positive for West Nile virus in Pennsylvania are very low in sharp contrast with the numbers recorded in 2012.

See the world

We see so little of the world that we live in. I was reminded of this yesterday when I visited Tivoli, where 17-year cicadas have emerged in great hordes.

Cary Institute to host outdoor performance by Arm of the Sea Theater

Discover how water from Catskill Mountaintops feeds Manhattan taps in the dynamic presentation, The City That Drinks the Mountain Sky.

Study finds ticks linked to Encephalitis in NYS

A recent study shows a link between a certain type of tick and a rare illness. The report shows the virus is on the rise in parts of the Hudson Valley and has spread to the Capital District.

Black-legged ticks linked to Encephalitis in New York State

In the Northeast, the black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) that spread Lyme disease also infect people with other maladies, among them anaplasmosis, babesiosis, and – as a new paper in the journal Parasites and Vectors reports – Powassan encephalitis.

Cary Institute, other experts aim to help public comprehend science

Understanding the natural world is important — especially to scientists. But they'll be the first to say: Science is not the easiest subject to explain.

Wired forest may reveal how New England forests respond to climate change

Monitoring a forest in New Hampshire provides clues to how important trees, such as maples, respond to changed conditions due to global warming.

The Lyme Wars

The New Yorker reports on the controversy surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease. Columnist Michael Specter interviewed Cary disease ecologist Richard Ostfeld about the ecology of ticks and the spread of the disease.

Pot smokers may be 'green,' but growers usually aren't

How green is your grass?  An upcoming scientific study in Conservation Letters shows that illegal marijuana farms can have serious environmental effects.

Zebra Mussels and the Hudson River

In the Housatonic River, zebra mussels -- non-native bivalves that can move into a water body and just dominate it -- were found in 2009 in Massachusetts and in 2010 in Connecticut at Lake Lillinonah and Lake Zoar.

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