Newsroom

Translators of science are badly needed

With today's challenging and emotionally charged environmental issues, its essential that current scientific information is communicated effectively and in ways stakeholders can understand.

West Nile virus proliferation stumps experts

Health officials and researchers are scratching their heads, wondering whether there will be a repeat this summer of last year's spike in the West Nile virus, a potentially fatal illness that mosquitoes transmit.

Eighteen international lake experts meet at the Cary Institute

This week the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies is hosting eighteen leaders in lake science. They hail from around the world, including Australia, New Zealand, Switzerland, Hungary, Ireland, Taiwan, Argentina, Canada, Ireland, and China. 

Policymakers briefed on water resources

Cary scientists David Strayer and Emma Rosi-Marshall delivered expert testimony at a May 5, 2013 congressional briefing that highlighted problems with aquatic invasive species and “natural infrastructure” solutions. The briefing took place on Capitol Hill as the U.S. Senate debated the Water Resources Development Act.

Flooding forum at Cary says work with nature

The havoc wrought by hurricanes Sandy and Irene heightened awareness of the impacts of flooding. The Millbrook Independent reports on a flood-management forum hosted by Cary on May 4, 2013.

Gibson: Lyme disease a major health problem

Richard S. Ostfeld,  a disease ecologist specializing in Lyme disease and West Nile Virus, said while "large advances have been made even with rather paltry funding," there needs to be "rapid improvements," such as better diagnostics for early-stage Lyme.

Despite other 'evidence', our climate is changing

Some of my friends and relatives don't believe in climate change, so I regularly get emails containing evidence that climate change isn't real. The "evidence" contained in these emails usually falls into one of two categories.

Climate change and dead fish: Think global, act local

Many of us eagerly anticipate summer, when fishing, boating and swimming can happen at a favorite lake. This year, though, there may also be a bit of trepidation —  what lies ahead for Lake Auburn? Will we see another fish kill?

Author shares thoughts on citizen science

An interview with former Cary Artist-in-Residence Akiko Busch who shares her reflections on contemporary citizen science efforts and experiences.

Cary scientist honored by EPA for Hudson River work

Aquatic ecologist Dr. Stuart E.G. Findlay was recently honored with an Environmental Quality Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for his work on the Hudson River.

Pharmaceutical pollution wreaking havoc on aquatic wildlife in freshwater streams

There has been a lot of concern over the possibility of pharmaceuticals ending up in freshwater and disrupting populations of wildlife. Now, new research shows that these concerns may be completely legitimate

Flushed drugs may threaten stream ecologies

Most streams that flow near cities and towns are laced with drugs that escape from sewage treatment plants or pharmaceutical factories.

Streams stressed by pharmaceutical pollution

Pharmaceuticals commonly found in the environment are disrupting streams, with unknown impacts on aquatic life and water quality.  

Invasive species pose serious danger to humans

Are invasive species killing us? This question must sound a little over the top if you think that invasive species are just garden pests, but history is filled with examples where they've killed humans.

Why I count glass eels

Former Cary writer-in-residence Akiko Busch writes about modern citizen science endeavors and how individuals are getting involved by helping to gather data about the environment.

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