Newsroom

Flushed drugs may threaten stream ecologies

Most streams that flow near cities and towns are laced with drugs that escape from sewage treatment plants or pharmaceutical factories.

Pharmaceutical pollution wreaking havoc on aquatic wildlife in freshwater streams

There has been a lot of concern over the possibility of pharmaceuticals ending up in freshwater and disrupting populations of wildlife. Now, new research shows that these concerns may be completely legitimate

Streams stressed by pharmaceutical pollution

Pharmaceuticals commonly found in the environment are disrupting streams, with unknown impacts on aquatic life and water quality.  

Invasive species pose serious danger to humans

Are invasive species killing us? This question must sound a little over the top if you think that invasive species are just garden pests, but history is filled with examples where they've killed humans.

Why I count glass eels

Former Cary writer-in-residence Akiko Busch writes about modern citizen science endeavors and how individuals are getting involved by helping to gather data about the environment.

Decreased water flow may be trade-off for more productive forest

Bubbling brooks and streams are a scenic and much loved feature of forest ecosystems, but long-term data at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest suggests that more productive forests might carry considerably less water.

Learn about the science of maple syrup

Sticker shock drove my family to start making maple syrup several years ago. In the long hours around the cooker, we figured out the science of maple sugaring. Satisfyingly, it takes biology, chemistry and physics to explain the process.

NYC forum: Silent Epidemic of Lyme and Tick-Borne Diseases

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Three members of Congress joined forces with a Lyme disease advocacy group to host a forum to discuss the fight against tick-borne diseases. As a panelist, Cary's Rick Ostfeld shared his research and insights.

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It's almost time for spring peepers

One of the first signs of spring in the Northeast is the unmistakable calling of the spring peeper. The peeper is a small frog, weighing only a few grams, but its mating call is louder than many songbirds weighing 10 times as much.

Biodiversity impacts Lyme disease

Science is revealing just how important preserving a diverse array of plants and wildlife is to reducing the spread of infectious diseases.

Cary Institute summer camp 2013

The theme for 2013 Summer Ecology Camp is "Journey through the Cycles of Life."

From our President

The inauguration of President Obama in late January, and his public emphasis on tackling climate change, brought new urgency to the scientific work at the Cary Institute.

Cary Institute scientists help lead the National Climate Assessment

On January 14, a week before President Obama said Americans must respond to climate change in his inauguration speech, a draft of the 2013 National Climate Assessment (NCA) was released.

Spotlights

Fog study workshop, spring Writer in Residence, staff distinctions and other Cary announcements.

Notes from the field: Hurricane Sandy passes through Millbrook

The Cary Institute's Environmental Monitoring Station instruments track air pollution, precipitation patterns, and solar radiation, among other things. These measurements provide a window into powerful storm systems, like Hurricane Sandy.

Engaging citizens in science

Cary Institute staff members have developed a range of citizen-science initiatives in which benefits flow equally between researchers and volunteers.

Aldo Leopold Society Autumn Celebration 2012

In appreciation of the Cary Institute’s most loyal donors, Irene and Jack Banning hosted the Aldo Leopold Society’s annual Autumn Celebration at Black Sheep Hill in Pine Plains on October 13, 2012.

Kentucky birds, New York rats raise disease risks, climate change concerns

Man-induced changes to the natural environment may be the perfect storm for the spread of diseases such as histoplasmosis, hantavirus, Lyme and typhus.

Winter scenery is fun to explore

There is always something to explore in nature during the winter. Discover resident birds, identify cold-weather insects, learn about plant adaptations, and enjoy the sunshine and scenery.

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Resettled rats torment New Yorkers in Sandy's wake

Huffington Post follows-up on disease ecologist Rick Ostfeld's warning of increased health risks related to urban rats being displaced by Hurricane Sandy.

New SPCA wetlands give pet waste royal treatment

Freshwater ecologist Stuart Findlay remarks on SPCA treatment of wastewater by a system that uses man-made wetlands, mimicking the water purification process that occurs in natural wetlands.

Earthworms increase soils' greenhouse gas emissions

Microbial Ecologist Peter Groffman comments on a new study that links increased CO2 and nitrous oxide emissions with worm-ridden soils.

Baltimore's Watershed 263 experiment in socioecology

Projects that improve water quality by planting vacant lots, parking strips, and other urban spaces with trees and community gardens also bring people out of doors and teach local kids about their environment.

Take Action: Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies' undergrad program seeks applicants

This summer, 10 undergraduate students will join the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies' research community to carry out science of their own design.

Irene and Sandy show the effects of extreme weather on lakes

National Geographic reports on the impacts of extreme weather events and the importance of research that studies their ecological effects.

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