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Specialists discuss Tropical Storms Irene and Lee's impacts on Hudson River

Time-Warner cable reports on a Cary hosted conference exploring the effects of Tropical Storms Irene and Lee on the Hudson River.

Council aims to educate on key environmental issues

Over the last 10 weeks, the Dutchess County Environmental Management Council has summarized its State of the Environment Report for Dutchess County.

wappinger creek

Preserving water a key goal in Dutchess

Water is the No. 1 environmental concern among Dutchess County residents. Concerns range from drought and flood prevention to pollution in drinking water, streams, lakes and other water bodies.

Lyme disease: Dutchess leads nation in cases

Dutchess County and four other mid-Hudson Valley counties have the nation's highest rates of Lyme disease, an illness transmitted by the bite of a tiny — and insidious — tick.

ecological engineering

Ecological engineering - Grand challenges ahead

Business, especially the pesticide industry, will face challenges in developing sustainable practices that will reduce insecticide use. Yet their active participation is necessary to bring about change.

This graphic shows the parts of the country with the highest incidences of Lyme disease. Graphic courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Lyme and other infectious diseases remain a concern in Dutchess County

Continued research is necessary to develop control measures to reduce the incidence of the disease. 

Flooding of Wappinger Creek in Pleasant Valley. Photo credit: Lia Harris.

Data shows warming climate

Our region's changing climate will continue to have widespread effects on our natural resources, agriculture, infrastructure, and human health. 

Limiting emissions key to clean air

There are three major air pollutants in Dutchess County: ozone, particulate matter, and acid precipitation. 

Station to aid water-quality monitoring

A new high-tech environmental monitoring station was unveiled on the banks of the Hudson River. 

New frontiers for coyotes may bring more Lyme disease

How coyotes and other predators influence Lyme risk.

New Hudson River monitoring station in Poughkeepsie unveiled

The new monitor is part of a network of 15 stations that provides round-the-clock data on conditions in the Hudson from Albany to New York Harbor. 

New Hudson River monitoring station in Poughkeepsie unveiled

Cary Institute, NYSDEC, Marist, USGS and partners join forces to protect river.

The ecology of disease

When we do things in an ecosystem that erode biodiversity — we chop forests into bits or replace habitat with agricultural fields — we tend to get rid of species that serve a protective role. 

guinea hens

A bull market in guinea hens

It's a hot summer in the Northeast — but not as hot as the quirky little market for guinea hens — the latest fad for the monied set looking to do battle against Lyme disease carrying ticks. 

Fox and coyote and ticks - oh, my!

Understanding the relationship between red foxes and coyotes may be another key in understanding the ecology of Lyme disease.

The invasion of the crawlers

Earthworms, a non-native species. Are they good or bad for the soil? 

Predators, prey, and Lyme disease

Given the health implications, "understanding the ecological mechanisms that drive Lyme disease in nature is very important." 

Floodplains are valuable habitats for birds and wildlife. (Photo credit: Bigstock)

Floodplains provide habitat, aid water distribution

Here are a few suggestions about how best to manage floodplains.

The floundering fish: Hudson River shad

Invasive species pose one of the top threats to the Hudson River. 

In wild animals, charting the pathways of disease

New York Times article explores the links between wildlife and infectious diseases.

The dirty truth about unpaved roads

Paving rural roads is one of the local issues that can get people in Dutchess County worked up. 

Understanding tick-borne diseases

Millbrook, NY – The Hudson Valley has the unfortunate distinction of being the global epicenter of tick-borne disease. And the situation is getting worse. 

Beware the impact of invasive plants

Take care to be sure that your "perfect plant" isn't actually a perfect menace in disguise. 

Invasive pests threaten our northern forests

“Catastrophic loss of tree species and a huge taxpayer burden—where's the sense in this?”

Warm spring tops off a perfect storm for increased Lyme disease risk

"We expect 2012 to be the worst year for Lyme disease risk ever." 

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