Publications

The Institute communicates its scientific and educational information in a number of ways. One major outlet is peer-reviewed publications and reports.  Cary Institute staff regularly publish in the best-rated journals in their respective fields.

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R. I. Osborne, M. J. Bernot, and S. E. G. Findlay, “Changes in Nitrogen Cycling Processes Along a Salinity Gradient in Tidal Wetlands of the Hudson River, New York, USA”, Wetlands, vol. 35, no. 2, p. 323 - 334, 2015.
K. K. McLauchlan, J. M. Craine, W. W. Oswald, P. R. Leavitt, and G. E. Likens, “Changes in nitrogen cycling during the past century in a northern hardwood forest”, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., vol. 104, p. 7466-7470, 2007.
C. E. Johnson, T. G. Siccama, C. T. Driscoll, G. E. Likens, and R. E. Moeller, “Changes in lead biogeochemistry in response to decreasing atmospheric inputs”, Ecol. Appl., vol. 5, p. 813-822, 1995.
K. Gould and S. E. G. Findlay, “Changes in interstitial water chemistry along a salinity gradient in the Hudson River”, J. Waldman and E. A. Blair (eds.). Polgar Fellowship Reports of the Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve Program, 1990. 1991.
D. S. W. Katz, “Changes in forest composition over 22 years in southeastern New York”, Undergraduate Ecology Research Reports. 2006.
R. A. Daniels, K. E. Limburg, R. E. Schmidt, D. L. Strayer, and R. C. Chambers, “Changes in fish assemblages in the tidal Hudson River, New York”, in J. N. Rinne, R. M. Hughes, and B. Calamusso (eds.). Historical Changes in Large River Fish Assemblages of America, vol. 45, 2005, p. 471-503.
R. D. Batt, S. R. Carpenter, J. J. Cole, M. L. Pace, and R. A. Johnson, “Changes in ecosystem resilience detected in automated measures of ecosystem metabolism during a whole-lake manipulation”, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 110, no. 43, p. 17398 - 17403, 2013.
S. H. Fernald, N. F. Caraco, and J. J. Cole, “Changes in cyanobacterial dominance following the invasion of the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha: Long-term results from the Hudson River estuary”, Estuaries and Coasts, vol. 30, p. 163-170, 2007.
S. J. Meiners and S. T. A. Pickett, “Changes in community and population responses across a forest-field gradient”, Ecography, vol. 22, p. 261-267, 1999.
D. L. Kirchman, A. Dittel, S. E. G. Findlay, and D. T. Fischer, “Changes in bacterial activity and community structure in response to dissolved organic matter in the Hudson River, New York”, Aquat. Microb. Ecol., vol. 35, p. 243-257, 2004.
M. Havas and G. E. Likens, “Changes in 22Na influx and outflux in Daphnia magna (Straus) as a function of elevated Al concentrations in soft water at low pH (acidic deposition)”, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA, vol. 82, p. 7345-7349, 1985.
J. G. Hubbell and G. M. Lovett, “A chamber for ozone exposure and misting of branches on mature trees”, in W. E. Winner and L. B. Phelps (eds.). Response of Trees to Air Pollution: The Role of Branch Studies, 1988, p. 120-129.
P. M. Groffman, et al., “Challenges to incorporating spatially and temporally explicit phenomena (hotspots and hot moments) in denitrification models”, Biogeochemistry, vol. 93, p. 49-77, 2009.
M. Pressley, K. Hogan, R. Wharton-McDonald, J. Mistretta, and S. Ettenberger, “The challenges of instructional scaffolding. . .the challenges of instruction that supports student thinking”, Learn. Disabil. Res. Pract, vol. 11, p. 138-146, 1996.
D. L. Strayer, “Challenges in understanding the functions of ecological heterogeneity.”, in G. M. Lovett, C. G. Jones, M. G. Turner, and K. C. Weathers (eds.). Ecosystem Function in Heterogeneous Landscapes, 2005, p. 411-425.
J. Lewis, W.M., et al., “Challenges for Limnology in the United States and Canada: An Assessment of the Discipline in the 1990's”, Report of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Challenges for Limnology Committee, vol. 4. p. 20, 1995.
D. L. Strayer, “Challenges for freshwater invertebrate conservation”, J. N. Am. Benthol. Soc., vol. 25, p. 271-287, 2006.
M. J. McDonnell, “The challenge of preserving urban natural areas: a forest for New York”, The Public Garden (J. Am. Assoc. Bot. Gard. Arbor.), vol. 3, p. 28-31, 1988.
C. G. Jones, R. S. Ostfeld, M. P. Richard, E. M. Schauber, and J. O. Wolff, “Chain reactions linking acorns to gypsy moth outbreaks and Lyme disease risk”, Science, vol. 279, p. 1023-1026, 1998.
M. B. Goldman, P. M. Groffman, R. V. Pouyat, M. J. McDonnell, and S. T. A. Pickett, “CH4 uptake and N availability in forest soils along an urban to rural gradient”, Soil Biol. Biochem., vol. 27, p. 281-286, 1995.
D. M. Forsyth, et al., “Century-scale effects of invasive deer and rodents on the dynamics of forests growing on soils of contrasting fertility”, Ecological Monographs, vol. 85, no. 2, p. 157 - 180, 2015.
M. T. K. Arroyo, R. Rozzi, M. P. Simonetti, J.A., and M. Salaberry, “Central Chile”, in R. A. Mittermeier, P. Robles-Gili, and C. Goettsch-Mittermeier (eds.). Hotspots: Earth's Biologically Wealthiest and Most Threatened Ecosystems, 2000, p. 210-231.
S. Cui, Y. Shi, P. M. Groffman, W. H. Schlesinger, and Y. - G. Zhu, “Centennial-scale analysis of the creation and fate of reactive nitrogen in China (1910-2010)”, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 110, no. 6, p. 2052 - 2057, 2013.
D. L. Strayer and H. M. Malcom, “Causes of recruitment failure in freshwater mussel populations in southeastern New York”, Ecological Applications, vol. 22, no. 6, p. 1780 - 1790, 2012.
R. S. Ostfeld, M. C. Miller, and K. R. Hazler, “Causes and consequences of tick (Ixodes scapularis) burdens on white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus)”, J. Mammal, vol. 77, p. 266-273, 1996.

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