Publications

The Institute communicates its scientific and educational information in a number of ways. One major outlet is peer-reviewed publications and reports.  Cary Institute staff regularly publish in the best-rated journals in their respective fields.

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Journal Article
K. N. Hopfensperger, S. S. Kaushal, S. E. G. Findlay, and J. C. Cornwell, “Influence of Plant Communities on Denitrification in a Tidal Freshwater Marsh of the Potomac River, United States”, J. Environ. Qual., vol. 38, p. 18-26, 2009.
J. D. Wehr, J. Petersen, and S. E. G. Findlay, “Influence of three contrasting detrital carbon sources on planktonic bacterial metabolism in a mesotrophic lake”, Microb. Ecol., vol. 37, p. 23-35, 1999.
P. H. Templer, G. M. Lovett, K. C. Weathers, S. E. G. Findlay, and T. E. Dawson, “Influence of tree species on forest nitrogen retention in the Catskill Mountains, New York, USA”, Ecosystems, vol. 8, p. 1-16, 2005.
T. Toolan, J. D. Wehr, and S. E. G. Findlay, “Inorganic phosphorus stimulation of bacterioplankton production in a meso-eutrophic lake”, Appl. Environ. Microbiol., vol. 57, p. 2074-2078, 1991.
S. S. Kaushal, et al., “Interaction between urbanization and climate variability amplifies watershed nitrate export in Maryland”, Environ. Sci. Technol., vol. 42, p. 5872-5878, 2008.
D. L. Strayer, et al., “Interactions between alien species and restoration of large-river ecosystems”, Arch. Hydrobiol. Suppl., vol. 155, p. 133-145, 2005.
S. Otto, P. M. Groffman, S. E. G. Findlay, and A. Arreola, “Invasive plant species and microbial processes in a tidal freshwater marsh”, J. Environ. Qual., vol. 28, p. 1252-1257, 1999.
S. E. G. Findlay and R. L. Sinsabaugh, “Large-scale variation in subsurface stream biofilms: A cross-regional comparison of metabolic function and community similarity”, Microb. Ecol., vol. 52, p. 491-500, 2006.
G. B. Hunsinger, S. Mitra, S. E. G. Findlay, and D. T. Fischer, “Littoral-zone influences on particulate organic matter composition along the freshwater-tidal Hudson River, New York”, Limnology and Oceanography, vol. 57, no. 5, p. 1303-1316, 2012.
S. S. Kaushal, et al., “Longitudinal patterns in carbon and nitrogen fluxes and stream metabolism along an urban watershed continuum”, Biogeochemistry, 2014.
V. R. Kelly, et al., “Long-term sodium chloride retention in a rural watershed: Legacy effects of road salt on stream water concentrations”, Environ. Sci. Technol., vol. 42, p. 410-415, 2008.
S. E. G. Findlay, D. L. Strayer, S. D. Smith, and N. Curri, “Magnitude and Patterns of Change in Submerged Aquatic Vegetation of the Tidal Freshwater Hudson River”, Estuaries and Coasts, vol. 37, no. 5, p. 1233 - 1242, 2014.
S. E. G. Findlay, R. L. Sinsabaugh, W. V. Sobczak, and M. Hoostal, “Metabolic and structural response of hyporheic microbial communities to variations in supply of dissolved organic matter”, Limnol. Oceanogr., vol. 48, p. 1608-1617, 2003.
S. E. G. Findlay, D. L. Strayer, C. Goumbala, and K. Gould, “Metabolism of streamwater dissolved organic carbon in the shallow hyporheic zone”, Limnol. Oceanogr., vol. 38, p. 1493-1499, 1993.
S. E. G. Findlay, C. Hickey, and J. Quinn, “Microbial enzymatic response to catchment-scale variations in supply of dissolved organic carbon”, NZ J. Mar. Freshwater Res., vol. 31, p. 701-706, 1997.
S. E. G. Findlay and T. L. Arsuffi, “Microbial growth and carbon transformations during decomposition of leaf litter in a stream”, Freshwater Biol., vol. 21, p. 261-269, 1989.
S. E. G. Findlay, S. Dye, and K. A. Kuehn, “Microbial growth and nitrogen retention in litter of Phragmites australis compared to Typha angustifolia”, Wetlands, vol. 22, p. 616-625, 2002.
D. M. Sanzone, J. L. Tank, J. L. Meyer, P. J. Mulholland, and S. E. G. Findlay, “Microbial incorporation of nitrogen in stream detritus”, Hydrobiologia, vol. 464, p. 27-35, 2001.
R. L. Sinsabaugh and S. E. G. Findlay, “Microbial production, enzyme activity and carbon turnover in surface sediments of the Hudson River Estuary”, Microb. Ecol., vol. 30, p. 127-141, 1995.
S. E. G. Findlay, W. C. Nieder, and D. T. Fischer, “Multi-scale controls on water quality effects of submerged aquatic vegetation in the tidal freshwater Hudson River”, Ecosystems, vol. 9, p. 84-96, 2006.
P. J. Mulholland, R. O. Hall, D. J. Sobota, S. E. G. Findlay, and A. J. Burgin, “Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by N-15 addition experiments: Denitrification”, Limnol. Oceanogr., vol. 54, p. 666-680, 2009.
S. E. G. Findlay, G. E. Likens, L. O. Hedin, S. G. Fisher, and W. H. McDowell, “Organic matter dynamics in Bear Brook, Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA”, J. N. Am. Benthol. Soc., vol. 16, p. 43-46, 1997.
T. S. Bianchi, S. E. G. Findlay, and R. Dawson, “Organic matter sources in the water column and sediments of the Hudson River estuary: the use of plant pigments as tracers”, Estuarine Coastal Shelf Sci., vol. 36, p. 359-376, 1993.
M. T. Harley and S. E. G. Findlay, “Photosynthesis-irradiance relationships for three species of submersed macrophytes in the tidal freshwater Hudson River”, Estuaries, vol. 17, p. 200-205, 1994.
M. L. Pace, G. B. McManus, and S. E. G. Findlay, “Planktonic community structure determines the fate of bacterial production in a temperate lake”, Limnol. Oceanogr., vol. 35, p. 795-808, 1990.

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