Publications

The Institute communicates its scientific and educational information in a number of ways. One major outlet is peer-reviewed publications and reports.  Cary Institute staff regularly publish in the best-rated journals in their respective fields.

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Journal Article
R. T. Edwards, J. L. Meyer, and S. E. G. Findlay, “The relative contribution of benthic and suspended bacteria to system biomass, production, and metabolism in a low-gradient blackwater river”, J. N. Am. Benthol. Soc., vol. 9, p. 216-228, 1990.
S. E. G. Findlay, M. L. Pace, and D. T. Fischer, “Response of heterotrophic planktonic bacteria to the zebra mussel invasion of the tidal freshwater Hudson River”, Microb. Ecol., vol. 36, p. 131-140, 1998.
S. E. G. Findlay and R. L. Sinsabaugh, “Response of hyporheic biofilm bacterial metabolism and community structure to nitrogen amendments”, Aquat. Microb. Ecol., vol. 33, p. 127-136, 2003.
R. Freimann, H. Bürgmann, S. E. G. Findlay, and C. T. Robinson, “Response of lotic microbial communities to altered water source and nutritional state in a glaciated alpine floodplain”, Limnology and Oceanography, vol. 58, no. 3, p. 951-965, 2013.
R. V. Pouyat, et al., “The role of federal agencies in the application of scientific knowledge”, Front. Ecol. Environ., vol. 8, p. 322-328, 2010.
L. Jin, P. Whitehead, D. I. Siegel, and S. E. G. Findlay, “Salting our landscape: An integrated catchment model using readily accessible data to assess emerging road salt contamination to streams”, Environ. Pollut., vol. 159, p. 1257-1265, 2011.
P. H. Templer, S. E. G. Findlay, and C. Wigand, “Sediment chemistry associated with native and non-native emergent macrophytes of a Hudson River marsh ecosystem”, Wetlands, vol. 18, p. 70-78, 1998.
P. H. Templer, S. E. G. Findlay, and G. M. Lovett, “Soil microbial biomass and nitrogen transformations among five species of the Catskill Mountains, New York, USA”, Soil Biol. Biochem., vol. 35, p. 607-613, 2003.
S. E. G. Findlay, R. L. Sinsabaugh, D. T. Fischer, and P. Franchini, “Sources of dissolved organic carbon supporting planktonic bacterial production in the tidal freshwater Hudson River”, Ecosystems, vol. 1, p. 227-239, 1998.
D. W. Kincaid and S. E. G. Findlay, “Sources of elevated chloride in local streams: Groundwater and soils as potential reservoirs”, Water Air Soil Pollut., vol. 203, p. 335-342, 2009.
S. E. G. Findlay, M. L. Pace, and D. T. Fischer, “Spatial and temporal variability in the lower food web of the tidal freshwater Hudson River”, Estuaries, vol. 19, p. 866-873, 1996.
P. J. Mulholland, et al., “Stream denitrification across biomes and its response to anthropogenic nitrate loading”, Nature, vol. 452, p. 202-206, 2008.
S. E. G. Findlay, “Stream microbial ecology”, J. N. Am. Benthol. Soc., vol. 29, p. 170-181, 2010.
C. Wigand, M. Finn, S. E. G. Findlay, and D. T. Fischer, “Submersed macrophyte effects on nutrient cycling in riverine sediments: contribution of "New" inputs”, Estuaries, vol. 24, p. 398-406, 2001.
C. S. Hopkinson, et al., “Terrestrial inputs of organic matter to coastal ecosystems: an intercomparison of chemical characteristics and bioavailability”, Biogeochemistry, vol. 43, p. 211-234, 1998.
S. E. G. Findlay, et al., “Total carbon analysis may overestimate organic carbon content of fresh waters in the presence of high dissolved inorganic carbon”, Limnol. Oceanogr. Methods, vol. 8, p. 196-201, 2010.
D. L. Strayer, N. F. Caraco, J. J. Cole, S. E. G. Findlay, and M. L. Pace, “Transformation of freshwater ecosystems by bivalves: a case study of zebra mussels in the Hudson River”, BioScience, vol. 49, p. 19-27, 1999.
S. E. G. Findlay and R. L. Sinsabaugh, “Unravelling the sources and bioavailability of dissolved organic matter in lotic aquatic ecosystems”, Mar. Freshwat. Res., vol. 50, p. 781-790, 1999.
S. E. G. Findlay, M. L. Pace, and D. Lints, “Variability and transport of suspended sediment, particulate and dissolved organic carbon in the tidal freshwater Hudson River”, Biogeochemistry, vol. 12, p. 149-169, 1991.
S. E. G. Findlay and W. V. Sobczak, “Variability in removal of dissolved organic carbon in hyporheic sediments”, J. N. Am. Benthol. Soc., vol. 15, p. 35-41, 1996.
M. L. Pace, S. E. G. Findlay, and D. Lints, “Variance in zooplankton samples: evaluation of a predictive model”, Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci., vol. 48, p. 146-151, 1991.
W. V. Sobczak and S. E. G. Findlay, “Variation in bioavailability of dissolved organic carbon among stream hyporheic flowpaths”, Ecology, vol. 83, p. 3194-3209, 2002.
N. F. Caraco, J. J. Cole, S. E. G. Findlay, and C. Wigand, “Vascular plants as engineers of oxygen in aquatic systems”, BioScience, vol. 56, p. 219-225, 2006.
S. E. G. Findlay, M. L. Pace, D. Lints, J. J. Cole, N. F. Caraco, and B. L. Peierls, “Weak coupling of bacterial and algal production in a heterotrophic ecosystem, the Hudson Estuary”, Limnol. Oceanogr., vol. 36, p. 268-278, 1991.
G. B. Hunsinger, S. Mitra, S. E. G. Findlay, and D. T. Fischer, “Wetland-driven shifts in suspended particulate organic matter composition of the Hudson River estuary, New York”, Limnol. Oceanogr., vol. 55, p. 1653-1667, 2010.

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