2014 Hudson Data Jam Competition

Making data "sing" through creative expression

 

The Hudson Data Jam Competition challenges students to creatively tell stories for a general audience using data from the Hudson River watershed.

Presentation Examples

Presentation Examples

 

 

 

 

Even seemingly “simple” science can actually be really complicated…but it doesn’t have to be!  It all has to do with how you tell the story. Scientists talk to other scientists a lot, so they tend to talk like this...

complicated rocket ship

 

 

...but non-scientists (and secretly, even scientists), generally prefer and understand...

 

 

 

We’re hoping you can help us bridge this communication gap with visual, verbal, and performance art, offering unique ways of communicating scientific data.

 

Since this is the first-ever Hudson Data Jam Competition, we don’t have any previous entries to show you, but we still want to provide you with inspirational examples of types of things that we’re hoping to see.  Below you’ll find works by others that we think are attractive to broad audiences, yet still communicate science in a creative, understandable way. 

But don’t forget – your project will also need to describe a trend or make a comparison using Hudson River watershed data.

up goer five

 

we cant wait logo

 

 

 

Puppet Shows

The Arm-of-the-Sea Theater brings the landscape of the Catskills to life through their puppet show "City That Drinks the Mountain Sky." They use scientific data to tell the story of the Hudson River's journey from a mountain top to a city tap.

 

Infographics

You can find many examples of conveying scientific data and information through the inventive use of images and text. Infographics have become increasingly popular, and there are a number of tools available to help you create your own:

Infogr.am
Visual.ly
Easel.ly

Infographics from USDA, National Aquarium and Science Connections.

 

 

 

 

 

Rap

"Quest for Joulelry," is an original piece from Jabari Johnson, a senior at Harlem Urban Assembly School for the Performing Arts. Winner of  the Science Genius Rap B.A.T.T.L.E.S. held at Columbia University, it is a clever example of combining science with hiphop.

 

Interpretive Dance

GonzoLabs' "Dance Your PhD" has arguably the most popular – and hilarious – examples of dances related to scientific data. For the annual "Dance Your PhD" competition, graduate students are asked to choreograph and videotape a dance that tells a story related to their PhD thesis. 

"A Dusty Story," tells a story about the dust transportation common in the eastern Great Basin of Utah.

 

 

Maps

Maps have long been used as a great tool for synthesizing and conveying scientific information. Today, we commonly see maps used to show different types of Hudson River data. For example, the Riverkeeper uses this nice map to display their water quality data.

A few online map-making tools:

Batchgeo
Geocommons
Google’s Fusion Tables

 

Sculpture

Several sculptors have been inspired by the beauty of the Hudson River, such as David Smith and his Hudson River Landscape completed in 1951.


Photo credit: David Smith

Today, artist-turned-activist Christine Destrempes travels across the country creating her “Stream of Consciousness” project to address the importance of water at various locations.

 

Poetry

Tampa Estuary Program Invasive Species Poetry Contest yielded this winning submission  highlighting the damage caused by exotic invaders on Florida's native habitats and species.

A Trio of Evil
Lovely but deadly the Lionfish have spread their range
Released partly thanks to a Hurricane
Once numbers of only three
Their masses are now seen from RI to Belize

Divers and fishermen have to fight back
And hold Lionfish derbies for wads of cash
All have high hopes to contain the creature
And keep it as it was- a rare aquarium feature

Bufo Toad all warty and thick
Secretes a poison that makes pets sick
Grayish-Brown with a slimy belly of yellow
He is a most repulsive fellow

Released in 1936 to control pests on sugar cane
He has now become a Florida pain
Looks harmless enough with no knobs on his head
But a lick of his skin leaves poor Fido dead

Burmese pythons - threatened in their native land
Are now a serious threat to man
Unchecked they could cover 1/3 of the states
And make pets or a child suffer a terrible fate

They can lay up to 100 eggs a year
And make meals of the sweet and rare Key Deer
They are unhampered now, sunning and well fed
We must end their reign and put a price on their head

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

Privacy Policy Copyright © 2014