June, 2012 - Trail Report Archive

Notes and changes since last report

  • It was clear and 78°, with a good breeze at 2:15 PM on June 27, 2012.
  • Northern broken-dash, Delaware skipper and northern pearly-eye have returned.
  • A number of red admirals were about. Is this a 2nd brood ramping up?

The Trails

  • It was once around the Gifford parking lot to check out the milkweed for insects.
  • A double headed black-eyed Susan was unusual, but this was bizzare. Recalling a creature in the new movie Promethius, I just slowly backed away.
  • I'd missed the earlier flowering of the our honeysuckle, but now the handsome berries were ripe.
  • Also along the boardwalk, swamp milkweed was budding up.
  • Something was odd about the stem; I zoomed in: it was aphids.
  • Near the front of the pond Turk's-cap lily was budding up.
  • I almost missed the Culver's root in the shadows.
  • Fringed loosestrife was beginning to bloom along the path.
  • It is the petioles - the leaf stems - that bear the fringes.
  • Barely noticable in all the foliage was enchanter's nightshade.
  • I went to the patch near the bridge for a look at the whole plant.
  • Along the way, bright yellow called out from the stump of the huge white pine that had fallen: a shelf fungus.
  • Departing the Glen, I noticed tall bellflower just beginning to bud.
  • It was quiet along the Cary Pines Trail and most of the Wappinger Creek Trail until I got to that sunny spot where I knew banded hairstreaks would be basking. As I left that spot, a large butterfly came out of the shadows at me: the first northern pearly-eye of the season.
  • Near the top of the rise in the trail, banded hairstreaks could be seen in sillouette overhead.
  • Something else flew by overhead and perched above them all: a white admiral - our less common of the two subspecies, red-spotted purple being the other.
  • The back Old Hayfield was hopping this afternoon. A grapeleaf skeletonizer moth was intently feeding on spreading dogbane and allowed several photos.
  • A male little glassy-wing sunned itself as the temperature slowly dropped.
  • Farther along, another couple was courting with the female's wing patterns visible.
  • Oooh, a coral hairstreak landed in front of me, but left before I could get a shot.
  • A milkweed patch was active with a number of things, but one color stood out as different: a black dash. That's new for trails!
  • It was quite a nice day.
Common milkweed
Multi-headed black-eyed Susan
Trumpet honeysuckle
Swamp milkweed
Aphids on milkweed
Turk's-cap lily
Culver's root
Fringed loosestrife
Fringed loosestrife
Enchanter's nightshade
A shelf fungus
Enchanter's nightshade
Tall bellflower
Northern pearly-eye
Banded hairstreak sillouette
White admiral
Little glassy-wing, male
Grapeleaf skeletonizer moth
Little glassy-wings
Black dash

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Great Blue Heron
  • 3 Chimney Swift
  • 1 Downy Woodpecker
  • 1 Northern Flicker
  • 2 Eastern Phoebe
  • 1 Eastern Kingbird
  • 4 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 3 Blue Jay
  • 5 American Crow
  • 6 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 4 Tufted Titmouse
  • 1 White-breasted Nuthatch
  • 1 Eastern Bluebird
  • 4 American Robin
  • 3 Gray Catbird
  • 1 Prairie Warbler
  • 1 Ovenbird
  • 1 Common Yellowthroat
  • 2 Scarlet Tanager
  • 2 Eastern Towhee
  • 3 Chipping Sparrow
  • 1 Field Sparrow
  • 2 Song Sparrow
  • 1 Northern Cardinal
  • 2 Indigo Bunting
  • 2 Red-winged Blackbird
  • 4 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 1 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
  • 10 Cabbage White
  • 4 Clouded Sulphur
  • 1 Coral Hairstreak
  • 3 Banded Hairstreak
  • 10 Great Spangled Fritillary
  • 2 Question Mark
  • 2 Painted Lady
  • 7 Red Admiral
  • 1 White Admiral
  • 2 Northern Pearly-eye
  • 8 Little Wood-Satyr
  • 24 Common Wood-Nymph
  • 1 Monarch
  • 6 Silver-spotted Skipper
  • 1 European Skipper
  • 2 Northern Broken-Dash
  • 6 Little Glassywing
  • 1 Delaware Skipper
  • 1 Black Dash
Plants
  • 1 Enchanter's nightshade
  • 1 Fringed loosestrife
Moth
  • 1 Grape Leaf Skeletonizer Moth
  • 1 Virginia Ctenucha

Notes and changes since last report

  • 90°F, hazy with light breezes at 1:30 PM.
  • I wanted to get out early and beat the heat, but that was not to be...
  • The banded hairstreak and little glassy-wing were back.
  • Seeds and berries were forming on some early bloomers.

The Trails

  • A lap around Gifford House parking lot was in order with all the milkweed blooming. I missed a photo of my first banded hairstreak of the season, but then noticed all the daisy fleabane in bloom.
  • It was so hot that even a European skipper seemed to be seeking shade of a milkweed leaf in the front Old Hayfield.
  • What do lightning bugs do during the day? This one was sitting in milkweed shade too.
  • The yellow goat's-beard, that looked like dandelion on steroids back in May, was continuing the game as it went to seed today.
  • I finally got a photo of the dogbane tiger moth that's been around for a while; of course it was in the shade.
  • In the shady tunnel of the Sedge Meadow Trail's board walk, a red admiral was feeding on a truly dead opossum.
  • A squirrel and I startled each other as I rounded a bend a little farther along.
  • My first thought was fall webworm, but that's later in the season; I'll have to come back when these caterpillars are a little bigger.
  • A sunny sand bar along the Wappinger Creek had banded hairstreak, cabbage white and even a very worn zabulon skipper.
  • Farther along, tall meadow-rue was in bloom.
  • In the Norway Spruce Glade above the Fern Glen, Venus's looking-glass was blooming on the dry hill side.
  • In cool of the Glen itself, red baneberry was now unmistakable.
  • And maple-leaved viburnum was forming obviously un-maple-like seeds.
  • Deeper in the Glen, chewed leaves caught my eye.
  • One leaf with a little bit of white poking out from underneath was begging me to turn it over; I couldn't resist. It could be a sawfly larva. You truly could not tell head from tail.
  • What I'd come back here for was a tiny blue flower I'd seen earlier.
  • A close look revealed the distinctive blossom of a speedwell - this one water speedwell.
  • Oops, I forgot the swamp candles as I was working my way back out through the fen.
  • They're small too, but again worth closer inspection.
  • In dryer areas, false Solomon's seal was forming berries.
  • Passing by the pond on my way out, I was stopped in my tracks by unbelievably red leaves on the river birch. How did I miss them before? What were they - a fungus? A look on the web, later, indicated it was the work of the velvet erineum gall mite and that, as with most galls, it didn't really bother the tree.
  • With the parking lot in sight and a swimming pool then 10 minutes away, I still had to stop for one more tiny gem today: a plume moth was dangling under a milkweed leaf in the Little Bluestem Meadow.
  • Even as I was loading the car, a different shade of orange was moving along the parking lot edge. Always keeping a few feet ahead of me, it was a painted lady seemingly trying to lure me away from the car to stay a little longer and get a better photo. Mediocre is better than poor; but pool is better than either; I left.
Daisy fleabane
European skipper
Lightning bug
Yellow goat's-beard
Dogbane tiger moth
Red admiral
Gray squirrel
Un-ID'd caterpillars
Banded hairstreak
Tall meadow-rue
Tall meadow-rue
Venus's looking-glass
Red baneberry
Maple-leaved viburnum
What's chewing these leaves?
A sawfly larva
Water speedwell
Water speedwell
Velvet erineum gall mite work on river birch
Plume moth
Painted lady
Swamp candles
Swamp candles
False Solomon's seal

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Red-tailed Hawk
  • 1 Northern Flicker
  • 2 Eastern Wood-Pewee
  • 3 Eastern Phoebe
  • 1 Warbling Vireo
  • 4 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 2 Blue Jay
  • 5 American Crow
  • 3 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 3 Tufted Titmouse
  • 3 White-breasted Nuthatch
  • 1 Golden-crowned Kinglet
  • 2 Eastern Bluebird
  • 2 Veery
  • 1 Wood Thrush
  • 3 American Robin
  • 2 Gray Catbird
  • 5 Cedar Waxwing
  • 1 Chestnut-sided Warbler
  • 1 Black-throated Green Warbler
  • 1 Pine Warbler
  • 1 Prairie Warbler
  • 4 Ovenbird
  • 1 Common Yellowthroat
  • 2 Scarlet Tanager
  • 1 Eastern Towhee
  • 1 Field Sparrow
  • 3 Song Sparrow
  • 2 Northern Cardinal
  • 1 Indigo Bunting
  • 1 Red-winged Blackbird
  • 2 Baltimore Oriole
  • 1 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 13 Cabbage White
  • 2 Clouded Sulphur
  • 7 Banded Hairstreak
  • 6 Great Spangled Fritillary
  • 2 Meadow Fritillary
  • 2 Question Mark
  • 1 Painted Lady
  • 1 Red Admiral
  • 1 Little Wood-Satyr
  • 10 Silver-spotted Skipper
  • 1 European Skipper
  • 2 Little Glassywing
  • 1 Zabulon Skipper
Plants
  • 1 Daisy flea-bane
  • 1 Tall meadow-rue
  • 1 Venus' looking-glass
  • 1 Water speedwell
  • 1 Swamp candles
Moth
  • 1 Plume Moth

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