August 01, 2012

Notes and changes since last report:

  • 75°F, cloudy and breezy at 10:45 AM, becoming brighter and warmer for a while.
  • Temps have been holding in the 80s and there have been showers and occasional rain every several days.
  • Three pairs of eyes today helped make more observations.
  • I don't usually select a feature photo from "the previous week" let alone off the usual route. Today, however...

The Trails

  • An eastern tailed-blue found one of us tasty, making "proceed with caution" a necessity on our part.
  • A moth flew into and might have escaped from an orb-weaver's well worn web, but the spider was quick.
  • In an amazing feat of deception, I coaxed the camera's well meaning, but misguided auto-focus onto a halloween pennant.
  • Oh yes, goldenrods, I realized, were beginning to bloom.
  • So were red chanterelles at the back of the Old Pasture - if mushrooms can be said to bloom.
  • I couldn't pass up the opportunity to snap a female dun skipper perfectly posed.
  • I'd spent some time last season on the Wappinger Creek Trail dealing with the first appearance of the recent invasive, Japanese stilt grass. Obviously, not enough time. The shiny mid-rib distinguishes it from a similar native grass. The extra stilt-like roots it puts down will confirm its ID.
  • In the Fern Glen, the antennae and proboscis were the flaw in the disguise. This was not the gentle (usually) pollen and nectar foraging bumble bee, but a predatious robber fly.
  • At the back of the pond, sneezeweed was beginning to bloom. Each dot in the cone is considered an individual flower.
  • Around the corner, sweet pepperbush was already filling the air with its scent even at this early stage.
  • In the shrub swamp, a red-spotted purple stopped to soak up some sun.
  • On the way out of the Glen, the broad leaf of zigzag goldenrod was easy to recognize.
  • I paused as I came upon the dead tree as Cary Pines Trail heads towards the Old Gravel Pit.
  • It was one tiny mushroom that I'd noticed.
  • Of course the more you look the more you find. I recognized a bright, white fungus from elsewhere the year before.
  • And likewise some screaming pink balls.
  • Another tiny black mushroom rose above a plain of moss.
  • By now it had clouded over again and I'd left my lunch in the car. Time to move on.
Eastern tailed-blue
Orb-weaver and moth
Halloween pennant
Goldenrods
Red chanterelles
Female dun skipper
Japanese stilt grass
Robber fly
Sneezeweed
Sneezeweed
Sweet pepperbush
Red-spotted purple
Zigzag goldenrod
Dead tree
Tiny mushroom
White fungus
Pink balls fungus
Another tiny mushroom
Female Zabulon skipper

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Cooper's Hawk
  • 1 Red-tailed Hawk
  • 1 American Woodcock
  • 1 Mourning Dove
  • 5 Chimney Swift
  • 2 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • 1 Downy Woodpecker
  • 1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
  • 1 Eastern Kingbird
  • 2 Blue Jay
  • 5 American Crow
  • 10 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 7 Tufted Titmouse
  • 1 Red-breasted Nuthatch
  • 1 Eastern Bluebird
  • 2 Wood Thrush
  • 2 American Robin
  • 4 Gray Catbird
  • 3 Cedar Waxwing
  • 1 Blue-winged Warbler
  • 1 American Redstart
  • 1 Louisiana Waterthrush
  • 4 Eastern Towhee
  • 2 Field Sparrow
  • 2 Indigo Bunting
  • 6 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 4 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
  • 2 Spicebush Swallowtail
  • 63 Cabbage White
  • 4 Clouded Sulphur
  • 2 Orange Sulphur
  • 3 Eastern Tailed-Blue
  • 11 Great Spangled Fritillary
  • 1 Meadow Fritillary
  • 27 Pearl Crescent
  • 1 Question Mark
  • 1 Painted Lady
  • 2 Red-spotted Purple
  • 1 Viceroy
  • 2 Appalachian Brown
  • 10 Common Ringlet
  • 22 Common Wood-Nymph
  • 9 Monarch
  • 26 Silver-spotted Skipper
  • 5 Least Skipper
  • 1 Peck's Skipper
  • 3 Northern Broken-Dash
  • 9 Zabulon Skipper
  • 4 Dun Skipper
Moth
  • 2 Dogbane Tiger Moth
  • 1 Galium Sphinx
  • 2 Hummingbird Clearwing
  • 1 Snowberry Clearwing
  • 1 White-striped Black
Plants
  • 1 Sneezeweed
  • 1 Sweet pepperbush
  • 1 Zigzag goldenrod

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