May 16, 2012

Notes and changes since last report

  • It was around 75°, cloudy and windy at 2:30 PM on May 16, 2012.
  • Red admirals were still around, but nothing like the week before.
  • Little wood-satyr and common ringlet had both returned.

The Trails

  • The pink lady's-slipper patch was boasting 10 blooms.
  • A fresh, female Juvenal's duskywing allowed a photo on the way to the Old Gravel Pit.
  • Crane flies are the largest family of flies. Unfortunately they can be mistaken for giant mosquitos, but they do not bite.
  • On the hill approaching the Fern Glen, penstemon was beginnig to bloom.
  • It was surrounded by the noxious black swallow-wort, just beginning to bud.
  • The first white-striped black was in the 'Glen! This normally constantly moving day-flying moth even allowed a photo!
  • A little bit of Labrador tea was actually looking good in the fen.
  • The unmistakeable royal fern was coming up along the boardwalk through the fen.
  • And cinnamon fern's fertile frond was beginning to make this one easy to ID.
  • The 'Glen's single pink lady's-slipper was back again this year; last year was its debut.
  • In the back of the 'Glen, the cluster of yellows had bounced back from being stomped by deer. Better than being eaten by deer.
  • Red baneberry was now easy to ID by the long, thin seed stalks.
  • I could smell it before I could see it: the swamp azalea, or perhaps more delicately put, "pinxter" was blooming and filling the air with it's fragrance.
  • Along the edge of the pond was NOT multiflora rose. I'll have to work on this one.
  • Common alumroot near the road is like giant bishop's cap.
  • Out on the Cary Pines Trail, maple-leaved viburnum was budding up.
  • I'd been wondering what was growing up around the foot bridge at the Appendix; it was a buttercup.
  • Coming up through the sandy Wappinger Creek Trail soil was the alien star-of-Bethlehem.
  • Nearby was another narrow-leaved bitter cress beginning to flower. A big plant like this can spew hundreds of seeds that persist in the soil for years.
  • Wild stonecrop always looks other worldly.
  • Here was this stuff again. Too many things look like this.
  • I stopped to look at something and noticed a little garter snake. As I tried for a closer picture, it "ran" away.
  • One-flowered cancer-root was everywhere in the back Old Hayfield today.
  • Little wood-satyr and common ringlet had both returned.
  • And I would return the next day to find tawny-edged skipper.
Pink lady's-slipper
Juvenal's Duskywing
Crane fly
Penstemon
Black swallow-wort
White-striped black (moth)
Labrador tea
Royal fern
Cinnamon fern fertile frond
Pink lady's-slipper
Yellow lady's-slipper
Red baneberry
Swamp azalea
Swamp azalea
Not multiflora rose...
Common alumroot
Maple-leaved viburnum
Buttercup
star-of-Bethlehem
Narrow-leaved bitter cress
Narrow-leaved bitter cress
Wild stonecrop
Unidentified plant
Garter snake
One-flowered cancer-root

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Turkey Vulture
  • 1 Mourning Dove
  • 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • 1 Downy Woodpecker
  • 1 Northern Flicker
  • 2 Eastern Phoebe
  • 1 Warbling Vireo
  • 6 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 4 Blue Jay
  • 1 American Crow
  • 1 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 1 House Wren
  • 2 Eastern Bluebird
  • 5 Veery
  • 4 American Robin
  • 2 Gray Catbird
  • 2 Blue-winged Warbler
  • 1 Chestnut-sided Warbler
  • 1 Black-throated Green Warbler
  • 2 Prairie Warbler
  • 1 Black-and-white Warbler
  • 3 Ovenbird
  • 2 Louisiana Waterthrush
  • 1 Common Yellowthroat
  • 2 Scarlet Tanager
  • 3 Eastern Towhee
  • 1 Chipping Sparrow
  • 2 Song Sparrow
  • 3 Northern Cardinal
  • 1 Red-winged Blackbird
  • 1 Brown-headed Cowbird
  • 5 Baltimore Oriole
  • 1 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 2 Cabbage White
  • 2 Clouded Sulphur
  • 14 Pearl Crescent
  • 1 Question Mark
  • 2 American Lady
  • 9 Red Admiral
  • 8 Little Wood-Satyr
  • 3 Common Ringlet
  • 1 Silver-spotted Skipper
  • 3 Juvenal's Duskywing
  • 3 Zabulon Skipper
Moth
  • 1 White-striped Black
Plants
  • 1 Common alumroot
  • 1 Labrador tea
  • 1 Penstemon
  • 11 Pink lady's-slipper
  • 1 Red baneberry
  • 1 Star-of-Bethlehem
  • 1 Sweet shrub
  • 1 White stuff
  • 1 Wild stonecrop

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