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Trail Reports

Insights on trail conditions and the plants and animals you can expect to encounter throughout the seasons.

BarryMeet Barry, the author of our trail reports >>

Notes and Changes since last report

  • It was 63°F, overcast and calm at 2:30 PM on April 26, 2017.
  • That was a little warmer and a little dryer than last week.
  • This week's trail report covers the Cary Pines Trail side of the trail system.
  • On all the trails, gray tree frogs were calling and shad flies were annoying.

The Trails

Red Trillium

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Turkey Vulture
  • 1 Pileated Woodpecker
  • 1 Eastern Phoebe
  • 1 American Crow
  • 1 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 1 Tufted Titmouse
  • 1 American Robin
  • 1 European Starling
  • 1 Pine Warbler
  • 1 Eastern Towhee
  • 1 Chipping Sparrow
  • 3 Field Sparrow
  • 1 Red-winged Blackbird
  • 1 Brown-headed Cowbird
  • 1 American Goldfinch
Caterpillars

 

  • 1 Eastern tent caterpillar
Herp

 

  • 1 Gray treefrog
Plants
  • 1 Carolina spring beauty
  • 1 Cut-leaved toothwort
  • 1 Hobble-bush
  • 1 Large-flowered trillium
  • 1 Leatherleaf
  • 1 Miterwort
  • 1 Red trillium
  • 1 Redbud
  • 1 Rue-anemone
  • 1 Spring-beauty
  • 1 Sugar maple
  • 1 Toothwort
  • 1 Wood anemone

Notes and Changes since last report

  • It was 53°F and cloudy with light breezes at 2:30 PM on April 19, 2017.
  • Occasional sprinkles turned into a fairly steady light rain.
  • This week's trail report covers the Wappinger Creek Trail side of the trail system.
  • Things were getting noticeably greener and some plants were starting to bloom.

The Trails

  • The view across the Old Hayfield at Gifford House was still bleak except for a puff of white in the distance.
  • It was shad bush.
  • On the Sedge Meadow Trail, honeysuckle leaves were getting bigger and the grass was taller than last week.
  • Down at the boardwalk the trend continued with skunk cabbage leaves unfurling.
  • Out in the Old Pasture, the bench was wet; I did not stop.
  • A dot of yellow was barely visible on the other side of the Wappinger Creek.
  • That was a patch of escaped daffodils.
  • At the bottom of the hill, trout-lily was beginning to bloom.
  • There was a little bit of yellow amongst the greenery along a feeder to the Creek.
  • Garden escapee, lesser celandine, is similar to our native marsh marigold.
  • Around my feet, Pennsylvania sedge was blooming.
  • It only grows 6" tall, deer don't eat it, and the flower is interesting. I think it would make a great no-mow lawn.
  • Wow, a moth on this cold, rainy day! It was the common oak moth.
  • Farther along the trail, wood duck could be just barely heard past the greening Japanese barberry.
  • Right at the base was bloodroot, with the clasping leaves that I find so interesting.
  • A surprise was two more. They must be one of the shortest lasting flowers; the cool will help them linger.
  • What? Even more! How cold I resist another photo?
  • By the foot bridge below the "Appendix" was a cloud of yellow.
  • Smell the flower, scratch-n-sniff the bark, and later - taste the berry.
  • To the other side was a clump of unmistakeable stinging nettles... unmistakeable if you've ever brushed against them.
  • I had to double back, but I knew it would be there: cut-leaved toothwort not quite in bloom yet.
  • Not bad for a rainy day.
  • Next week: the Cary Pines Trail side of the trail system.
Bloodroot

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Wood Duck
  • 3 Sharp-shinned Hawk
  • 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • 1 Eastern Phoebe
  • 1 Blue Jay
  • 1 American Crow
  • 3 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 1 Brown Creeper
  • 1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
  • 2 American Robin
  • 1 Red-winged Blackbird
Plants
  • 1 Bloodroot
  • 1 Daffodil
  • 1 Lesser celandine
  • 1 Pennsylvania sedge
  • 1 Shad bush
  • 1 Spicebush
  • 1 Trout-lily
Moth
  • 1 Common Oak Moth

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