trail map

Trail Reports

Insights on trail conditions and the plants and animals you can expect to encounter throughout the seasons.

BarryMeet Barry, the author of our trail reports >>

Notes and Changes since last report

  • It was 71°F, cloudy and calm at 10:30 AM on May 16, 2018.
  • This week's trail report covers the Cary Pines Trail side of the trail system.
  • Interesting birds included blackpoll warbler and hooded warbler.
  • It was not a great butterfly day, but eastern pine elfin was seen Monday.

The Trails

  • The lilacs at Gifford House parking lot were looking at peak.
  • Trees had leafed out over the past week making the Old Hayfield look more like spring if not summer.
  • Behind the Carriage House, buckeye had started blooming.
  • Just past it, fothergilla had started, too.
  • Along the edge of the Little Bluestem Meadow, nannyberry was budding up.
  • Out in the meadow, a mourning dove was perched on a high dead branch.
  • Just visible from the path through the Old Gravel Pit, a brown thrasher lurked at the field's edge.
  • Farther along the path, a smudge ran across from one side to another.
  • It was only the first congregation of springtails I would encounter this day.
  • These tiny, "primitive" insects are also known as snowfleas when they appear in the winter.
  • Starflower had started to bloom with Canada mayflower right behind it.
  • Near the exit to the Fern Glen, a scarlet tanager was drowning out the hooded warbler I was desperately seeking. I did eventually catch a decent look at it.
  • At the edge of the Fern Glen, pink azalea had survived last year's roadside brush hogging.
  • The blossoms were looking at their best.
  • In the 'Glen, wild blue phlox had opened.
  • Striped maple blossoms were being attended by a small bee.
  • Lower to the ground, starry false Solomon's seal was being attended by an ant.
  • Wild columbine had shown up in a new spot.
  • Sprawling all over was Jacob's ladder.
  • One of our mystery plants from earlier times was in bloom.
  • Twinleaf had finished blooming and its comical pods were already swelling.
  • A small clump of foamflower was keeping a low profile.
  • Large-flowered trillium, once white, was turning pink in age.
  • With a little practice, bellwort is becoming easier to tell from large-flowered bellwort.
  • Nodding trillium seems pretty obvious.
  • And Jack-in-the-pulpit should not be a problem at this point.
  • Along the edge of the pond, golden ragwort had started.
  • Out in the fen, tiny bog rosemary had to be looked for.
  • There is only one swamp saxifrage here.
  • It doesn't flower often and it's hard to tell when it does.
  • Bracken is a big, bold fern.
  • Like a smaller version of bracken, oak fern is also much more polite.
  • The yellow lady's slipper is part of the Phenology Trail, a citizen science project monitoring the timings of biological events.
  • Always the strangest flower in the 'Glen, gaywings was blooming.
  • On the way out, choke cherry was just starting.
  • Next week: the Wappinger Creek Trail side of the trail system.
Pink Azalea

Sightings

Birds
  • 2 Mourning Dove
  • 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • 1 Downy Woodpecker
  • 1 Warbling Vireo
  • 2 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 2 Blue Jay
  • 1 American Crow
  • 1 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 1 Carolina Wren
  • 1 House Wren
  • 1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
  • 1 Eastern Bluebird
  • 2 Veery
  • 5 Wood Thrush
  • 1 American Robin
  • 2 Gray Catbird
  • 1 Brown Thrasher
  • 1 Chestnut-sided Warbler
  • 2 Pine Warbler
  • 1 Prairie Warbler
  • 1 Blackpoll Warbler
  • 6 Ovenbird
  • 1 Louisiana Waterthrush
  • 1 Common Yellowthroat
  • 1 Hooded Warbler
  • 4 Scarlet Tanager
  • 1 Eastern Towhee
  • 2 Chipping Sparrow
  • 1 Field Sparrow
  • 1 Northern Cardinal
  • 1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
  • 1 Red-winged Blackbird
  • 1 Baltimore Oriole
  • 1 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 1 Spring Azure
Insects
  • 1 Springtail
Plants
  • 1 Bellwort
  • 1 Bog rosemary
  • 1 Buckeye
  • 1 Choke cherry
  • 1 Foamflower
  • 1 Fothergilla
  • 1 Gaywings
  • 1 Golden ragwort
  • 1 Jacob's ladder
  • 1 Mystery plant
  • 1 Nodding trillium
  • 1 Pink azalea
  • 1 Pink lady's-slipper
  • 1 Starflower
  • 1 Striped maple
  • 1 Swamp saxifrage
  • 1 Wild blue phlox
  • 1 Wild columbine
Moth
  • 1 White-banded toothed carpet

Notes and Changes since last report

  • It was 78°F, partly cloudy and calm at 3:00 PM on May 9, 2018.
  • This week's trail report covers the Wappinger Creek Trail side of the trail system.
  • The weather has been finally feeling like the time of year it is.
  • And returning birds and plants have been appearing just about daily.

The Trails

Red-tailed Hawk

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Mallard
  • 1 Red-tailed Hawk
  • 1 Mourning Dove
  • 2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • 1 Downy Woodpecker
  • 1 Northern Flicker
  • 1 Eastern Phoebe
  • 1 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 2 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 2 Tufted Titmouse
  • 1 White-breasted Nuthatch
  • 1 Carolina Wren
  • 1 House Wren
  • 1 Veery
  • 1 Wood Thrush
  • 3 American Robin
  • 3 Gray Catbird
  • 3 Prairie Warbler
  • 6 Ovenbird
  • 1 Louisiana Waterthrush
  • 1 Common Yellowthroat
  • 4 Scarlet Tanager
  • 3 Eastern Towhee
  • 1 Field Sparrow
  • 1 Northern Cardinal
  • 1 Red-winged Blackbird
  • 2 Brown-headed Cowbird
  • 3 Baltimore Oriole
  • 5 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 2 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
  • 5 Cabbage White
  • 8 Spring Azure
Caterpillars
  • 1 Eastern Tent Caterpillar
Plants
  • 1 Apple
  • 1 Dwarf cinquefoil
  • 1 Flowering dogwood
  • 1 Garlic mustard
  • 1 Japanese barberry
  • 1 Lilac
  • 1 Tussock sedge
  • 1 Violet blue
  • 1 Violet yellow
  • 1 Wild strawberry

Pages

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

Privacy Policy Copyright © 201