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Trail Reports

Insights on trail conditions and the plants and animals you can expect to encounter throughout the seasons.

BarryMeet Barry, the author of our trail reports >>

Notes and Changes since last report

  • It was 78°F and cloudy with light breezes at 2:30 PM on June 25, 2014.
  • Weather was coming in and skies were variable the whole time.
  • Cedar waxwings could be heard above on every trail.
  • American lady was a nice sight.
  • A chigger bite this evening was not nice in any way. They are here.

The Trails

  • The threat of showers was never realized this afternoon - I had my rain gear.
  • Heading into the Old Gravel Pit, one could smell the elderberry before seeing it.
  • The red low battery icon blinked as I zoomed in on a flower head.
  • My brow furrowed as I probed the empty pocket for the fresh battery that went into it 30 minutes ago.
  • Partridgeberry was blooming in a number of places.
  • In the Fern Glen, an American lady was a subject that justified suspending battery austerity mode.
  • Swamp candles were blooming off the board walk in the fen.
  • The small flowers were worth a closer look.
  • On the Wappinger Creek Trail, an ebony jewelwing perched in the sun allowing a rare photo.
  • Zooming in shows what predators these harmless appearing dragonfly relatives are. All those leg bristles filter prey out of the air as they fly.
  • Farther along the trail was the most well marked yellow slant-line (moth) that I'd ever seen.
  • Movement along the Sedge Meadow Trail halted me: an Appalachian brown. The wear & tear on the edges of the wings, especially the shadowed right wings, suggested that I had indeed caught a glimpse of one last week.
  • Out in the back Old Hayfield, black-eyed Susans were blooming and being attended by bees and other critters.
  • In the front Old Hayfield, European skippers were still out in numbers, some on the newly blooming rough-fruited cinquefoil.
  • The alien Deptford pink could be found hiding in the tall grass.
  • Back at Gifford parking lot, I found there was still some charge on the battery and squandered two photos of butter and eggs including a close up.
  • With abandon, I sought out the so-common-you-forget-about-it birdfoot trefoil.
  • The only other thing I could find was common St. Johnswort.
  • Well, except for that spare battery; it was on the floor of the car.
Ebony jewelwing

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Barred Owl
  • 1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
  • 1 Eastern Phoebe
  • 2 Yellow-throated Vireo
  • 1 Warbling Vireo
  • 2 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 2 Blue Jay
  • 1 Tree Swallow
  • 1 White-breasted Nuthatch
  • 1 House Wren
  • 1 Eastern Bluebird
  • 3 Veery
  • 2 Wood Thrush
  • 3 American Robin
  • 2 Gray Catbird
  • 2 Cedar Waxwing
  • 1 Blue-winged Warbler
  • 1 Pine Warbler
  • 1 Prairie Warbler
  • 2 Ovenbird
  • 2 Scarlet Tanager
  • 3 Eastern Towhee
  • 1 Chipping Sparrow
  • 1 Field Sparrow
  • 1 Northern Cardinal
  • 1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
  • 1 Brown-headed Cowbird
  • 1 Baltimore Oriole
  • 2 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 1 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
  • 1 Spring Azure
  • 8 Great Spangled Fritillary
  • 7 Pearl Crescent
  • 1 Red-spotted Purple
  • 4 Little Wood-Satyr
  • 24 Common Ringlet
  • 3 Silver-spotted Skipper
  • 13 European Skipper
  • 1 Peck's Skipper
Plants
  • 1 Bittersweet nightshade
  • 1 Common milkweed
  • 1 Crown vetch
  • 1 Daisy fleabane
  • 1 Poison sumac
  • 1 Tall meadow-rue
Moth
  • 1 Snowberry Clearwing

Notes and Changes since last report

  • It was warm and calm with light breezes at 1:00 PM on June 18, 2014.
  • Going back for shorts was a good idea.
  • Common milkweed was just opening.
  • Great spangled fritillary was back.

The Trails

  • It started off cool enough for long pants, but one lap around the first field was enough to change my mind.
  • Common milkweed was beginning to open at the Gifford parking lot. My favorite butterfly magnet.
  • The invasive crown vetch was blooming too.
  • Along the front Old Hayfield, another escapee, privet, had attracted an eastern tiger swallowtail.
  • Down on the Wappinger Creek Trail, tall meadow-rue was beginning to blossom.
  • In the Fern Glen, daisey fleabane was starting up.
  • Large-flowered bellwort seed pods were fattening up.
  • False Solomon's-seal was forming berries. Compare them with those of Canada mayflower and their being in the same genus starts to not seem so odd.
  • Back in the fen, bittersweet nightshade was climbing the poison sumac.
  • The nightshade was blooming and the sumac seemed to be just starting.
  • On the way back through the Old Gravel Pit, an unbroken egg was on the ground. Perhaps an ovenbird's?
Eastern tiger swallowtail

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Barred Owl
  • 1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
  • 1 Eastern Phoebe
  • 2 Yellow-throated Vireo
  • 1 Warbling Vireo
  • 2 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 2 Blue Jay
  • 1 Tree Swallow
  • 1 White-breasted Nuthatch
  • 1 House Wren
  • 1 Eastern Bluebird
  • 3 Veery
  • 2 Wood Thrush
  • 3 American Robin
  • 2 Gray Catbird
  • 2 Cedar Waxwing
  • 1 Blue-winged Warbler
  • 1 Pine Warbler
  • 1 Prairie Warbler
  • 2 Ovenbird
  • 2 Scarlet Tanager
  • 3 Eastern Towhee
  • 1 Chipping Sparrow
  • 1 Field Sparrow
  • 1 Northern Cardinal
  • 1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
  • 1 Brown-headed Cowbird
  • 1 Baltimore Oriole
  • 2 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 1 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
  • 1 Spring Azure
  • 8 Great Spangled Fritillary
  • 7 Pearl Crescent
  • 1 Red-spotted Purple
  • 4 Little Wood-Satyr
  • 24 Common Ringlet
  • 3 Silver-spotted Skipper
  • 13 European Skipper
  • 1 Peck's Skipper
Plants
  • 1 Bittersweet nightshade
  • 1 Common milkweed
  • 1 Crown vetch
  • 1 Daisy fleabane
  • 1 Poison sumac
  • 1 Tall meadow-rue
Moth
  • 1 Snowberry Clearwing

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