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Trail Reports

Insights on trail conditions and the plants and animals you can expect to encounter throughout the seasons.

BarryMeet Barry, the author of our trail reports >>

Notes and Changes since last report

  • It was 65°F, partly cloudy and calm at 2:00 PM on June 7, 2017.
  • This week's trail report covers the Cary Pines Trail side of the trail system.
  • Red-spotted purple, monarch and Peck's Skipper were out today.
  • There were a few surprise plants too...

The Trails

  • With the recent rains I was hoping for butterfly activity on the Carriage House road.
  • There wasn't much, but there was an interesting centipede crossing the road.
  • Behind the Carriage House, rhododendron was still looking well.
  • A nessus sphinx was too busy to allow a good photo.
  • The Little Bluestem Meadow had been mowed - that will set back the dogbane patch.
  • On the other side of the Scots Pine Alleé, a wild turkey was skulking along.
  • In the Old Gravel Pit, an ebony jewelwing was sampling leaves for the best sun.
  • Above the Fern Glen, a common whitetail was trying to warm up too.
  • Around the limestone cobble, exotic vancouveria was in bloom.
  • On the way back to the fen, our only greenish-flowered pyrola had been damaged, but was still able to bloom.
  • Red baneberry was forming its long-stalked fruit, making it easy to distinguish from white baneberry.
  • The railing above the fen made a nice sun room for a daddy-long-legs.
  • In the fen, pitcher plants were in full bloom now.
  • From the little bridge by the deck, hidden trumpet honesuckle was now obvious.
  • Zooming in showed how handsome this native vine's flowers are.
  • I wasn't sure about black snakeroot - I'd been thinking avens.
  • A few blossoms were left on the swamp azalea - I got straightened out on that one...
  • Near the kiosk, Bowman's root was blooming - that's had a name change a little while ago.
  • I didn't think the diervilla by the kiosk would be blooming yet.
  • And I never saw the blue flag at the pond coming.
  • The carrion flower had been easy to follow.
  • As I was going, a curved-line looper moth was obliging.
  • Not far into the Cary Pines Trail, maple-leaved viburnum was doing well.
  • Next week: the Wappinger Creek Trail side of the trail system.
Trumpet Honeysuckle

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Wild Turkey
  • 1 Great Blue Heron
  • 1 Pileated Woodpecker
  • 1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
  • 1 Warbling Vireo
  • 3 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 3 Blue Jay
  • 1 Tree Swallow
  • 2 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 2 House Wren
  • 1 Eastern Bluebird
  • 2 Veery
  • 1 Wood Thrush
  • 2 American Robin
  • 1 Gray Catbird
  • 2 European Starling
  • 3 Cedar Waxwing
  • 1 Pine Warbler
  • 1 Ovenbird
  • 1 Scarlet Tanager
  • 1 Chipping Sparrow
  • 1 Song Sparrow
  • 1 Red-winged Blackbird
  • 2 Brown-headed Cowbird
  • 1 Baltimore Oriole
  • 3 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 1 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
  • 3 Spicebush Swallowtail
  • 1 Pearl Crescent
  • 1 Red-spotted Purple
  • 4 Little Wood-Satyr
  • 1 Common Ringlet
  • 1 Monarch
  • 2 Silver-spotted Skipper
  • 2 Hobomok Skipper
Insects
  • 1 Common Whitetail
  • 1 Ebony Jewelwing
Plants
  • 1 Bowman's-root
  • 1 Diervilla
  • 1 Greenish-flowered pyrola
  • 1 Maple-leaved viburnum
  • 1 Short-styled snakeroot
  • 1 Trumpet honesuckle
  • 1 Vancouveria
Moth
  • 1 Curve-lined Looper Moth
  • 1 Nessus Sphinx

Notes and Changes since last report

  • It was 72°F, mostly cloudy and windy at 12:30 PM on May 31, 2017.
  • This week's trail report covers the Wappinger Creek Trail side of the trail system.
  • More butterfly species were back including Little Wood-Satyr, Silver-spotted Skipper and Tawny-edged Skipper.
  • The cool air and intermittent warm sun made for good butterfly viewing.

The Trails

  • It was mild, but blustery and the leaves were showing their white bellies at the Old Hayfield trail head by Gifford House.
  • Spittle bugs were amongst the bedstraws filling the field.
  • The moth that seemed to flutter from every foot step was the White-banded toothed carpet - its caterpillar shares with the spittle bugs.
  • Oxeye dasies and hawkweeds were new bloomers.
  • Suddenly this week little wood-satyrs were everywhere... but who's that next door?
  • It looked * a lot * like the emerald ash borer, but it was the half-sized honeysuckle borer.
  • One nice thing about the sun going in and out is getting views of both sides of that satyr.
  • Tower mustard seems to show up so quickly you could watch it grow.
  • A tiny blur of orange settled on a grass stalk - always away from me. The moth, Pyrausta bicoloralis was my best guess.
  • Invasive black swallowwort was hiding in the tall grass.
  • "Black" refers to its tiny, dark flower. Monarchs recognize that it is related to milkweed, but it is 100% fatal to their caterpillers.
  • Angelica and larger blue flag were up in the Sedge Meadow.
  • The Angelica was popular with some small bees.
  • Some of the blue flag were already open.
  • In the back of the back Old Hayfield, the strange fruit of ironwood were dangling.
  • Cow vetch was blooming deeper in the field.
  • The fungus stump on the Wappinger Creek trail was in production again.
  • A flock of some 15 mallards was feeding up ahead.
  • Garden escapee, star-of-Bethlehem was around in clusters.
  • It was nice when a mayfly actually landed. The head seemed to be little more than two eyes.
  • It hadn't been too warm out today, but the bench at the "Appendix" looked pretty good by now.
  • Next week: the Cary Pines Trail side of the trail system.
Black Swallowwort

Sightings

Birds
  • 15 Mallard
  • 1 Great Blue Heron
  • 1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo
  • 1 Chimney Swift
  • 1 Belted Kingfisher
  • 2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • 1 Downy Woodpecker
  • 1 Northern Flicker
  • 3 Eastern Wood-Pewee
  • 1 Eastern Phoebe
  • 1 Great Crested Flycatcher
  • 1 Yellow-throated Vireo
  • 1 Warbling Vireo
  • 4 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 6 Tree Swallow
  • 1 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 1 House Wren
  • 4 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
  • 1 Eastern Bluebird
  • 2 Veery
  • 3 Wood Thrush
  • 2 American Robin
  • 1 Gray Catbird
  • 3 European Starling
  • 1 Yellow Warbler
  • 1 Pine Warbler
  • 2 Ovenbird
  • 2 Louisiana Waterthrush
  • 1 Common Yellowthroat
  • 2 Eastern Towhee
  • 2 Chipping Sparrow
  • 2 Field Sparrow
  • 1 Song Sparrow
  • 4 Northern Cardinal
  • 2 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
  • 1 Brown-headed Cowbird
  • 3 Baltimore Oriole
Butterflies
  • 5 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
  • 3 Spicebush Swallowtail
  • 1 Cabbage White
  • 1 Clouded Sulphur
  • 25 Pearl Crescent
  • 12 Little Wood-Satyr
  • 3 Common Ringlet
  • 1 Silver-spotted Skipper
  • 1 Tawny-edged Skipper
Plants
  • 1 Angelica
  • 1 Black swallowwort
  • 1 Cow vetch
  • 1 Hawkweed
  • 1 Larger blue flag
  • 1 Ox-eye daisy
  • 1 Star-of-Bethlehem
  • 1 Tower mustard
Moth
  • 1 Hummingbird Clearwing
  • 1 Pyrausta bicoloralis
  • 1 White-banded toothed carpet
  • 1 White-striped Black

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