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Trail Reports

Insights on trail conditions and the plants and animals you can expect to encounter throughout the seasons.

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Notes and Changes since last report

  • This week's trail report covers the Cary Pines Trail side of the trail system.
  • It was 73°F, partly cloudy and breezy at 2:00 PM on August 26, 2015.
  • It would cloud over and become calm in short order.
  • Birding was at its best on all sides of the Sedge Meadow today.

The Trails

  • Along the road to the Carriage House, pokeberry berries were forming.
  • On the other side of the road, thistle was going to seed. It was actually lively and colorful with goldfinch seeking out the first seeds and fritillaries the last blooms.
  • At the head of the Scots Pine Alleé, a common green darner dropped out of a low altitude sweep to rest in the shade.
  • Nearby, a lacewing was perched in the sun, slowly waving its abdomen from side to side. No, I don't know why.
  • A glance back over the shoulder across the Little Bluestem Meadow revealed a fallsy landscape.
  • The clouds had thickend by the time the Fern Glen was reached. A damselfly was trying to get the most of the remaining weak sunshine.
  • Along the edge of the pond, bottle gentian was blooming. Another name is closed gentian...
  • Closer to the kiosk, the rambling vine, groundnut was blooming.
  • Nearer to the back of the pond, sneezeweed was peaking.
  • In the shade at the back of the pond, summer-sweet appeared to have been blooming for a while.
  • On the way around and back to the kiosk, climbing hempweed was filling the air with its sweet fragrance.
  • There was another little turtlehead. This may be more common than it seems, keeping a low profile by not appearing in large colonies.
  • A speck of color caught my eye on the way out of the 'Glen: the tiny, psychadelic candy-striped leafhopper.
  • The Cary Pines Trail was quiet, so quiet I noticed the easy to overlook jumpseed.
  • Next week: the Wappinger Creek Trail side of the trail system.
A Leafhopper

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • 3 Downy Woodpecker
  • 1 Pileated Woodpecker
  • 1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
  • 4 Eastern Phoebe
  • 2 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 3 Blue Jay
  • 5 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 4 Tufted Titmouse
  • 3 White-breasted Nuthatch
  • 2 Veery
  • 1 Wood Thrush
  • 20 American Robin
  • 1 Worm-eating Warbler
  • 6 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 4 Cabbage White
  • 11 Clouded Sulphur
  • 9 Great Spangled Fritillary
  • 2 Meadow Fritillary
  • 2 Pearl Crescent
  • 1 Mourning Cloak
  • 1 Common Ringlet
  • 1 Monarch
Plants
  • 1 Climbing hempweed
  • 1 Jumpseed
  • 1 Little bluestem
  • 1 Summer-sweet

Notes and Changes since last report

  • This week's trail report covers the Wappinger Creek Trail side of the trail system.
  • It was 80°F, partly cloudy and windy at 2:00 PM on August 19, 2015.
  • It's been pretty warm and dry; threats of showers have been empty.
  • Finally tawny-edged skipper has shown up here - it's been elsewhere for some time.

The Trails

  • It was tough to leave the patch of shade in the Giffird parking lot, but the fields were calling.
  • Milkweed pods were fattening in the front Old Hayfield.
  • The high and dry section of the Sedge Meadow Trail was lined with gray dogwood full of ripening berries.
  • The little notch into the Meadow offered a bit of shade and a view of purple loosestrife.
  • It was a few minutes before I noticed turtlehead right at my feet.
  • Birds were the distraction; I was surrounded by gray catbirds; hummingbirds were feeding in front of me and worm-eating warblers were skulking with common yellowthroats in the silky dogwood.
  • The back Old Hayfield had a hummingbird clearwing. I recalled that I had few decent photos and prepared to take a few more and it was gone in a flash.
  • On the Wappinger Creek Trail, something went a round my head and clamped onto a tree trunk. Northern pearly-eye? No, one of the catocala underwings. A 2nd shot and it was gone.
  • Where the trail comes close to the water, trout of various sizes could be seen.
  • A chewed up enchanter's nightshade was offering its clinging seeds to pants and socks of passersby.
  • Invasive Japanese stilt grass was growing plenty of its namesake stilts.
  • Know it by the shiny midvein.
  • That it flowers late in the season after other grasses aids in its removal.
  • One-seeded bur cucumber was a little farther along the trail.
  • Lower to the ground was agrimony, already done flowering.
  • It too sports hitch hiking seeds.
  • Right below the Appendix, i.e. around Trail Marker 10, stinging nettle, wood nettle and false nettle could all be found in one spot.
  • Next week: spots along the Cary Pines Trail side of the trail system.
Hummingbird Clearwing and Wild Bergamot

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Mourning Dove
  • 1 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • 1 Downy Woodpecker
  • 2 Eastern Wood-Pewee
  • 1 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 3 Blue Jay
  • 2 American Crow
  • 2 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 1 Tufted Titmouse
  • 1 Veery
  • 5 American Robin
  • 4 Gray Catbird
  • 1 Cedar Waxwing
  • 1 Worm-eating Warbler
  • 2 Common Yellowthroat
  • 3 Eastern Towhee
  • 1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
  • 1 Indigo Bunting
  • 1 Baltimore Oriole
  • 7 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 1 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
  • 5 Cabbage White
  • 4 Clouded Sulphur
  • 1 Orange Sulphur
  • 2 Eastern Tailed-Blue
  • 3 Great Spangled Fritillary
  • 1 Meadow Fritillary
  • 4 Pearl Crescent
  • 2 Common Ringlet
  • 2 Common Wood-Nymph
  • 1 Silver-spotted Skipper
  • 2 Tawny-edged Skipper
Plants
  • 1 False nettle
  • 1 One-seeded bur cucumber
  • 1 Zigzag goldenrod
Moth
  • 1 Catocala Underwing
  • 1 Hummingbird Clearwing

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