trail map

Trail Reports

Insights on trail conditions and the plants and animals you can expect to encounter throughout the seasons.

BarryMeet Barry, the author of our trail reports >>

Notes and Changes since last report

  • This week's trail report covers the Wappinger Creek Trail side of the trail system.
  • It was 85°F, partly cloudy and breezy at 12:00 PM on September 2, 2015.
  • Trails have been mown and brush trimmed back.
  • The front Old Hayfield was mowed.

The Trails

  • The front Old Field has been mowed to keep it a field free of shrubs and trees.
  • Along the unmown edge, invasive but pretty spotted knapweed attracted a Peck's skipper.
  • Something flew around my head and dove into a cedar along the dry side of the Sedge Meadow Trail.
  • Surprise, it was a red admiral. Strange place for a red admiral...
  • The low side of the trail was, as last week, throbbing with birds including red-eyed vireo.
  • In the back Old Hayfield, goldenrods were pulling in locust borers. We usually think of bees, but beetles are major pollinators as well.
  • Next year, the back field will be mown with the front remaining as refuge for late season wildlife and overwintering eggs, larvae and pupae.
  • The fungus by the watershed kiosk on the Wappinger Creek Trail was expanding. I've seen these grow 1-1/2" in diameter per day.
  • A little farther along was an interesting blue-green mushroom.
  • As I approached the "Appendix", something looked a little different up ahead... Actually it was arump.
  • She was aware of me sitting on the bench watching her browse the shrubs.
  • Eventually she wandered upstream, playing peek-a-boo along the way.
  • Wandering back towards the parking lot, I stepped back as something again flew around my head. It was the size and color of a pearl crescent, but the place and behavour were odd... It was a harvester, our only carnivorous butterfly: Its caterpillar eats woolly aphids, typically on alders. But by now we were in a dry conifer forest... Another mystery.
Peek-a-boo

Sightings

Birds
  • 2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • 1 Pileated Woodpecker
  • 1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
  • 4 Eastern Phoebe
  • 3 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 1 Blue Jay
  • 8 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 2 Tufted Titmouse
  • 1 White-breasted Nuthatch
  • 3 House Wren
  • 1 Veery
  • 1 Wood Thrush
  • 6 American Robin
  • 6 Gray Catbird
  • 4 Cedar Waxwing
  • 2 Common Yellowthroat
  • 3 Eastern Towhee
  • 5 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 23 Cabbage White
  • 14 Clouded Sulphur
  • 7 Orange Sulphur
  • 1 Eastern Tailed-Blue
  • 1 Harvester
  • 14 Great Spangled Fritillary
  • 12 Pearl Crescent
  • 1 Red Admiral
  • 1 Common Wood-Nymph
  • 8 Silver-spotted Skipper
  • 1 Peck's Skipper
  • 4 Tawny-edged Skipper

Notes and Changes since last report

  • This week's trail report covers the Cary Pines Trail side of the trail system.
  • It was 73°F, partly cloudy and breezy at 2:00 PM on August 26, 2015.
  • It would cloud over and become calm in short order.
  • Birding was at its best on all sides of the Sedge Meadow today.

The Trails

  • Along the road to the Carriage House, pokeberry berries were forming.
  • On the other side of the road, thistle was going to seed. It was actually lively and colorful with goldfinch seeking out the first seeds and fritillaries the last blooms.
  • At the head of the Scots Pine Alleé, a common green darner dropped out of a low altitude sweep to rest in the shade.
  • Nearby, a lacewing was perched in the sun, slowly waving its abdomen from side to side. No, I don't know why.
  • A glance back over the shoulder across the Little Bluestem Meadow revealed a fallsy landscape.
  • The clouds had thickend by the time the Fern Glen was reached. A damselfly was trying to get the most of the remaining weak sunshine.
  • Along the edge of the pond, bottle gentian was blooming. Another name is closed gentian...
  • Closer to the kiosk, the rambling vine, groundnut was blooming.
  • Nearer to the back of the pond, sneezeweed was peaking.
  • In the shade at the back of the pond, summer-sweet appeared to have been blooming for a while.
  • On the way around and back to the kiosk, climbing hempweed was filling the air with its sweet fragrance.
  • There was another little turtlehead. This may be more common than it seems, keeping a low profile by not appearing in large colonies.
  • A speck of color caught my eye on the way out of the 'Glen: the tiny, psychadelic candy-striped leafhopper.
  • The Cary Pines Trail was quiet, so quiet I noticed the easy to overlook jumpseed.
  • Next week: the Wappinger Creek Trail side of the trail system.
A Leafhopper

Sightings

Birds
  • 1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
  • 3 Downy Woodpecker
  • 1 Pileated Woodpecker
  • 1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
  • 4 Eastern Phoebe
  • 2 Red-eyed Vireo
  • 3 Blue Jay
  • 5 Black-capped Chickadee
  • 4 Tufted Titmouse
  • 3 White-breasted Nuthatch
  • 2 Veery
  • 1 Wood Thrush
  • 20 American Robin
  • 1 Worm-eating Warbler
  • 6 American Goldfinch
Butterflies
  • 4 Cabbage White
  • 11 Clouded Sulphur
  • 9 Great Spangled Fritillary
  • 2 Meadow Fritillary
  • 2 Pearl Crescent
  • 1 Mourning Cloak
  • 1 Common Ringlet
  • 1 Monarch
Plants
  • 1 Climbing hempweed
  • 1 Jumpseed
  • 1 Little bluestem
  • 1 Summer-sweet

Pages

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

Privacy Policy Copyright © 2015