Long-term Monitoring

The Latest

Thanks to climate change and wetter weather, forest soils are absorbing less methane

Farming, energy production, and landfills produce methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Forests can remove methane from the atmosphere through the activity of soil bacteria. But increasing precipitation – a symptom of climate change – is making it harder for forest soils to trap greenhouse gases, creating a feedback loop that exacerbates global warming.

Long-term monitoring is essential to effective environmental policy

Environmental policy guided by science saves lives, money, and ecosystems. So reports a team of eleven senior researchers in Environmental Science & Policy. Using air pollution in the United States as a case study, they highlight the success of cleanup strategies backed by long-term environmental monitoring. 

Lake Mohonk and Mohonk Mountain House in New Paltz, NY

Understanding the world's lakes takes center stage at GLEON 19

More than 240 scientists and researchers from around the world recently descended on the Hudson Valley to strengthen an international partnership aimed at studying and understanding the world’s lakes.

gene likens 1957

Long-term Study

We often forget that some of today's obvious and formidable environmental problems were not recognized without tedious long-term studies by dedicated scientists with a hunch.

Related Projects

cary forest

Long-Term Monitoring of the Forest Ecosystem at Cary

We measure key aspects of forest productivity, species composition and nutrient cycling in the mixed-oak forest at Cary. This long-term monitoring allows us to track trends in the forest ecosystem resulting from air pollution and other stresses.

zebra mussel

Zebra Mussels and the Hudson River

Zebra mussels appeared in the Hudson in 1991 and fundamentally transformed the ecosystem. The zebra mussel invasion is linked to losses of native mussels and changes in the fish community.

aspirated shields at the Climate Reference Network station

Environmental Monitoring Program

Environmental Monitoring is a long-term program designed to understand how our environment changes over time. Long-term monitoring allows us to evaluate legislation aimed at controlling pollution and climate change.

Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System

HRECOS provides continuous, real-time data on environmental conditions in the Hudson River. There are fifteen monitoring stations at eight sites, spanning from Albany to the New York Harbor

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies | Millbrook, New York 12545 | Tel (845) 677-5343

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