Cyanobacteria & Algal Blooms

Researchers recruit drones, satellites in quest to understand cyanobacteria

Podcast

In order to understand out how blooms have been changing over time, researchers need comprehensive, consistent measurements from lakes across our region.

Lake Sunapee

Landsat 8 as a tool for monitoring algal blooms

In a new study, researchers investigate how advances in remote sensing technology can be used to predict and monitor algal blooms before they turn harmful. Using satellites that detect chlorophyll, which is present in algae, they are developing ways to monitor water quality from outer space.

Cyanobacterial bloom on Lake Sunapee, New Hampshire

Researchers take to tech to study toxic cyanobacteria with $1.47M NASA grant

With support from a $1.47 million grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Dartmouth, and the University of New Hampshire are developing high-tech tools to monitor cyanobacteria in lakes, predict impending blooms, and identify factors that are degrading water quality.  

algae

Scientists develop warning system to reduce harm from toxic algal bloom

Researchers have developed a new warning system that can effectively foresee a toxic algal bloom in a body of water and in turn help resource managers to avert its development well in advance.

algae lake erie

Scientists develop early-warning system for toxic algae blooms

Toxic algae blooms in lakes and reservoirs are highly destructive, resulting in fish kills and toxicity risks to wildlife, livestock – and even humans. But their development is difficult to predict. 

Toxic algae can put water sources at risk

Perhaps this summer’s most ironic story was the news that residents of Toledo, Ohio, a city on the shores of one of the largest and most magnificent lakes in the world, had no water to drink. 

Climate change and dead fish: Think global, act local

Many of us eagerly anticipate summer, when fishing, boating and swimming can happen at a favorite lake. This year, though, there may also be a bit of trepidation —  what lies ahead for Lake Auburn? Will we see another fish kill?

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