Mosquito-borne disease

Rats, cats, and people trade-off as main course for mosquitoes in Baltimore, MD

Social and ecological dynamics of neighborhoods influence who mosquitoes bite

mosquito

Poor neighborhoods and mosquitoes

Podcast

Mosquito-borne diseases pose a growing risk to public health in urban areas. Asian tiger mosquitoes are a vector of high concern as they thrive in cities, live in close association with people, and can reproduce in very small pools of water.

Bug Hunt

Every July, for four years running, Shannon LaDeau inspected nine ceramic toilets sitting idly in a vacant lot behind a building, near a block of abandoned lots and houses on the edge of the West Baltimore neighborhood of Franklin Square. No, she is not weird. This was for science.

World's Deadliest Animal: The Mosquito

Lecture Video

Concerned about Zika, West Nile, and other mosquito-borne diseases? Discover which mosquito species spread illnesses, why invasive Asian tiger mosquitoes increase our risk of getting sick, and lessons learned about effective mosquito management.

Interview with disease ecologist Shannon Ladeau

Podcast

Disease ecologist Dr. Shannon Ladeau talks with WKZE about her research and the world's deadliest animal-the mosquito. Discover which mosquito species spread illnesses, why invasive Asian tiger mosquitoes increase our risk of getting sick, and lessons learned about mosquito management.

abandoned buildings

The hidden inequality of mosquito bites

Living in a low-income neighborhood means dealing with all manner of injustices that richer people don't have to deal with — from low life expectancy to worse air quality to earsplitting noise to slower Internet speeds.

toilet sampling

In urban Baltimore, poor neighborhoods have more mosquitoes

A new study published in the Journal of Medical Entomology reports that in Baltimore, Maryland, neighborhoods with high levels of residential abandonment are hotspots for tiger mosquitoes (Aedes albopictus). This environmental injustice may leave low-income urban residents more vulnerable to mosquito-borne disease.

The Cary Institute teams with IBM Research to address Zika

When the Zika virus arrived in Brazil, it went largely unnoticed until infected infants were born with microcephaly, a neurological disorder marked by a small head caused by severe underdevelopment of brain tissue in utero. As the number of Zika-affected babies grew, the World Health Organization moved quickly to declare Zika virus a public health emergency of international concern.

mosquito

Zika may be spread by 35 mosquito species, says study

Zika virus could be transmitted by 35 mosquito species, including 26 previously unsuspected ones, according to a new predictive model created by scientists.

Predicting disease: Tracking probabilities

Podcast

Two-thirds of the diseases which infect humans are thought to originate from animals. Is it possible to predict where new disease outbreaks may occur in the future?

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