2018 News Archive

gene likens

Franklin Institute award winners include two Nobel laureates

Gene Likens, founder of the Cary Institute, has been selected for the 2019 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Earth & Environmental Science for his work on acid rain.

surveying fish Camp Lake

Angling for sustainable fisheries

We all know what a landscape is, but have you ever heard of a FishScape? 'Fishscapes' are lake-rich regions where recreational fishing opportunities are plentiful and interactions among anglers, regulatory institutions, and local economies influence fishery health.

Ecosystem ecologist Kathleen Weathers

Kathleen Weathers to serve as President of the Ecological Society of America

Cary Senior Scientist to head the world’s largest community of ecologists

Platypus

Stream insects concentrate pharmaceutical pollution and pass it to predators

Animals that eat bugs in or near streams at risk of being dosed with drugs

Widely used mosquito repellent proves lethal to larval salamanders

By harming mosquito predators, picaridin may help mosquitoes survive

Microbes hitch a ride inland on coastal fog

Microorganisms, including potential pathogens, travel from sea to land via fog,

In the eastern US, adult trees adapt and acclimate to local climate

Trees growing in temperate forests in the eastern US show strong adaptation or acclimation to local climate. So reports a new study that analyzed more than 23,000 tree cores to investigate how adult trees respond to changes in climatic conditions.

Tim Hoellein: In Conversation

Tim Hoellein is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biology at Loyola University, Chicago. He studies the effects of different forms of human-caused pollution on freshwater systems.

Evaluating the gas we pass

Ecologists are embracing the potential to increase the storage of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. This could reduce the build-up of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere. But does it?

Thanks to climate change and wetter weather, forest soils are absorbing less methane

Farming, energy production, and landfills produce methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Forests can remove methane from the atmosphere through the activity of soil bacteria. But increasing precipitation – a symptom of climate change – is making it harder for forest soils to trap greenhouse gases, creating a feedback loop that exacerbates global warming.

New mentoring program brings community members together to study their local watershed

MH-YES immerses Poughkeepsie students, scientists, & high school teachers in stream ecology research

Summer 2018 REU Spotlight

Cary Institute is home to one of the nation’s longest running Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) programs. Meet the 2018 summer cohort. 

Kishi Oyagi

Jammin’ on the Hudson

Hudson Valley students experiment with creative approaches to science storytelling in the 2018 Hudson Data Jam 

Forest ecology shapes Lyme disease risk in the eastern US

In the eastern US, risk of contracting Lyme disease is higher in fragmented forests with high rodent densities and low numbers of resident fox, opossum, and raccoons. These are among the findings from an analysis of 19 years of data on the ecology of tick-borne disease in a forested landscape

Emerald ash borer

Imported forest pests: What are the impacts and who pays?

Imported pests threaten forest health, local economies, and the benefits trees provide to cities and communities.

Communities can do more through 'Climate Smart' initiative

In 2009, the New York State Department of Conservation launched the Climate Smart Communities (CSC) program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and prepare New Yorkers for the effects of climate change.

Lake Sunapee

Landsat 8 as a tool for monitoring algal blooms

In a new study, researchers investigate how advances in remote sensing technology can be used to predict and monitor algal blooms before they turn harmful. Using satellites that detect chlorophyll, which is present in algae, they are developing ways to monitor water quality from outer space.

Hippo waste causes fish kills in Africa’s Mara River

Ecologists have long known that agricultural and sewage pollution can cause low oxygen conditions and fish kills in rivers. A study published today in Nature Communications reports that hippo waste can have a similar effect in Africa’s Mara River, which passes through the world renowned Maasai Mara National Reserve of Kenya, home to more than 4,000 hippos.

Mycorrhizae

Most folks don't realize it, but the roots of plants are connected underground by a vast network of fungi that improve the function of plant roots. The fungi exist in what is known as a symbiosis—both the fungus and the plant benefit. The fungus gets its energy from the plant, and the plant gains access to soil nutrients by the action of the fungus.

8 facts about the ecology of Lyme

Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. In the Northeast, the blacklegged ticks that spread Lyme disease are increasing their range, putting more people in harm’s way. 

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