Newsroom

Phenology: telling time by nature’s clock, with cary institute

Author and gardener Margaret Roach gets a lesson in phenology from Victoria Kelly, Environmental Monitoring Program Manager at the Cary Institute. Environmental Monitoring is a longterm program at Cary, begun in the 1980s and designed specifically to monitor climate—and the air, precipitation and water chemistry.

Peeper keeper

For nearly 20 years, Gary Lovett has kept a journal with notes about a variety of natural events taking place in his backyard in southeastern New York, including the date that spring peepers begin peeping in his vernal pool each year.

Opossums: Where Lyme disease goes to die

Say hello to the opossum, the American marsupial with a pointy nose and prehensile tail that dines on ticks like a vacuum dines on dust.

The Dark Side of Road Salt

When cities and states apply tons of it to roads like they did this winter, drinking water supplies can be easily contaminated.

snow storm

Cary Institute examines salt runoff

Salt, it makes roads safe in the winter, but is it safe for the environment? "In small quantities it would be safe, but not in large quantities," said Vicky Kelly, who manages environmental monitoring for the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies.

Coyotes likely to show up in your neighborhood

Breeding wolves were killed off in New York back in the 1890s. But hearing nighttime howling today should not be blamed on our imaginations. Another predator, the eastern coyote (Canis latrans), abounds in our area and provides a similar hair-raising effect when we hear it calling.

Road salt: Winter's $2.3 billion game changer

With cities across the United States facing one of the most brutal winters in recent memory, the use of road salt can be an economic game changer, one that forces snowy cities to be innovators that balance safety, cost and the environment.

Snow protects infected ticks

This frigid, snowy winter may be keeping many people indoors, but is likely doing little to kill slumbering hordes of ticks that can carry Lyme disease.

Fresh perspective

Cary's head of education Alan Berkowitz explains why undergraduate research programs are so valuable-both for the students, who gain research experience, and the scientists, whose scientific thinking can benefit from the mentoring experience.

Study: Earth’s fresh-water resources at risk

Although western Lake Erie has become an international poster child for noxious algae, a new study suggests that many of the world’s much smaller, cleaner, and calmer bodies of water are likewise in trouble if greater efforts are not undertaken to keep farm fertilizers and other nutrients out of them.

Which diet is best for New Year's resolution

Familiar to the snowy landscape are salt trucks slowly crawling up and down the interstates and city streets sprinkling salt (which is only effective in temperatures above 15 degrees), or salt-brine over the roads.

Supply crunch for road salt

Officials across the country are scrambling to get enough road salt this year, after last winter’s brutal weather largely cleaned out stockpiles.

Why you shouldn't use hand sanitizers

Cary-led research has found that antibacterials, such as triclosan, have made their way into the American water system and are fueling the development of drug-resistant bacteria. And there are human health-related reasons to avoid their use in our daily lives.

The Emerald Ash Borer and other invaders

More and more often, we hear about the arrival of a foreign plant or insect that is wreaking havoc on our native ecosystems. Take, for example, the Emerald Ash Borer, which will likely decimate all the ash trees in our forests.

Bumper acorn crop now, not good news for Lyme disease later

Mice, chipmunks and shrews are welcoming hosts for the bacteria ticks spread. They're plentiful. They're low to the ground, so ticks can easily hop aboard. And they lack the immune systems that might compromise any infectious agents.

Cutting down on salt

Experts and officials look for ways to reduce the use of road salt, which can persist in the environment for many years. 

Storm Ecology: Trickle down

Podcast
Heavy storms cause a lot more than water to come trickling down into our rivers. Podcast interview with freshwater ecologist Dr. Stuart Findlay.

Storm Ecology: Light

Podcast
Any time there are high flow events bringing water and sediments from the tributaries and over the dam, it causes several fairly dramatic changes. Podcast interview with freshwater ecologist Dr. Stuart Findlay.

Waning light spurs autumn foliage display

Vicky Kelly, manager of the environmental monitoring program at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook said trees have evolved methods for coping with our winters over thousands of years, the biggest trigger of which is shortened days.

Allow us to introduce the "Gloeo Gang"

In the first of a series of serendipitous events leading to today’s Gloeo Gang, an undergraduate Cayelan contacted the Lake Sunapee Protective Association (LSPA, lakesunapee.org), a nonprofit watershed group of energetic citizen scientists with a keen interest in their home lake (Sunapee) in New Hampshire

An interview with Cary guest lecturer Steven Cohen

Robin Hood Radio interviews Steven Cohen, Executive Director of Columbia University’s Earth Institute, about his Cary Institute lecture The Path to Sustainability. Cohen discusses the importance of environmental policy and the need to manage short-term costs for long-term gains.  

Cary Institute students present their findings

On August 15 the 12 students in this year’s Cary Institute’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program presented the results of the research they conducted during the ten weeks they spent at the Institute this summer.

Scientists track ticks as they move north

While Lyme disease is usually found along coastal areas-the mid-Hudson valley, Long Island, and parts of the Jersey shore-people are now reporting tick bites further and further north into the Capital region, and even some people in the Adirondacks

Acid rain aftermath: damaged ecology, damaged politics

Since the bad old days of the 1970s and '80s, there has been a whole lot less acid falling on the Northeast. That’s mostly thanks to the 1990 Clean Air Act, which has made a big difference to lakes and streams.

Acid rain: what it takes to stop pollution

pH levels, a measure of acidity, are improving in the Adirondacks. Now, when the state stocks fish in many lakes, they survive, and even thrive, to the joy of fishermen who found the 1970s and '80s depressing. It's a remarkable turnaround in since acid rain's discovery in the U.S. by Gene Likens, just a half century ago.

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