Newsroom

Peter Groffman elected LTER Chair

At its most recent meeting, the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Science Council elected nicrobial ecologist Peter Groffman the new Chair.

Week highlights invasives among us

Invasive species typically are referred to as those moved from their native range by human activity and, having established themselves in the wilds of the new place, cause ecological or economic harm.

Decades of Hudson River data show the flow of time

Most research projects on the Hudson River look at a snapshot of time: a spring, a summer, a year or two. But the Hudson, like other rivers, is constantly changing.

blacklegged tick

Study finds one tick bite can deliver multiple infections

Podcast
A new study in New York reveals that ticks are more likely to be infected with several pathogens, not just the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. The ticks for the study were collected from Dutchess County.

Cary's Weathers lectures on fog

Biogeochemist Kathleen Weathers studies the chemicals and living organisms in fog or mist. Illuminating the chemical relationships among water, land, forests and the ocean increases our understanding of the ecological importance of fog and air pollution.

'Morphing' Hudson begs for more study

We've all heard the expression, "Think global, act local." In the environmental context, its popularity no doubt comes from a sense of reassurance — that by taking small, personal steps, we can make a difference.

Biodiversity offsets: risks, opportunities and the contribution of ecological engineering

A terrestrial ecologist at Cary, Clive Jones' work focuses on the concept of organisms that help to engineer the ecosystem. In this interview, he talks about the relationship between ecological engineering and ecological compensation. 

Study documents Hudson River ecosystem changes over 25 years

The Hudson River includes a stretch where tides affect the river as much at its mouth near Manhattan as 150 miles inland at Troy, N.Y. Most of that section is freshwater.

Cary Institute to study Lyme's effect on mice

Fresh off of a study that showed mice don't die any quicker as uninfected ticks pile onto them, the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies is launching research that will examine how mice fare after they get Lyme disease.

Is climate change to thank for dramatic recovery of acid rain's 'canary in the coal mine'?

There’s a dramatic recovery underway in New England. Red spruce, a tree species that researchers thought was doomed because of acid rain, is now growing faster than ever, and it’s not the only tree growing like gangbusters.

A crash course in urban watersheds

Urban waterways have been channeled, diverted, buried and polluted for centuries, but they have only recently been studied as part of the larger urban ecosystem.

NY carbon goals among the most ambitious

For New York to achieve its goals in the Obama administration's plan to reduce carbon emission from power plants, the state will have to do more than cut back on dirty fuel

Rolling old river is indeed changing

The Hudson River has changed in many far-reaching ways over the past quarter-century as a result of human activity. Zebra mussels and other invasive species have changed the river's ecology.

New York is a hotbed for damaging forest pests

When Chris Standley received a tip that some ash trees within the Mohonk Preserve might be infested by a devastating insect, he grabbed a drawknife and peeled away the bark.

Poop-hunting crocodile robot dodges hippo ... for science!

Video
Sending a robotic airboat disguised as a crocodile to look for hippo poop in Kenya's Mara River sounds like a hilarious idea, but it wasn't so funny when the hippopotamus started chasing the robot.

New Science Policy Exchange Project: Forest Pests and Pathogens

The Harvard Forest, in collaboration with the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, has launched a new Science Policy Exchange project on forest pests and pathogens. This project addresses growing concerns about damage to trees, forests, and local economies caused by introduced insects. 

Lyme Disease: Ten things you always wanted to know about ticks...

To find out how to steer clear of Lyme disease during "picnic season" - a time when people are more likely to pick up ticks - the National Science Foundation spoke with NSF-funded disease ecologist Rick Ostfeld of the Cary Institute.

Lyme disease season approaches, but it's still too early to tell how the cold winter affected ticks

With the snow melted and the weather warming, folks are finally making their way outdoors, where, if you live anywhere in the Hudson Valley, the black-footed tick that carries Lyme disease can be found.

snowy road

How much salt is in your well water? For some, too much

More than half of the private wells in the Town of East Fishkill have higher concentrations of sodium from road salt than some government health standards recommend, according to a new study by Cary scientists.

As tick infestation grows, so does Lyme disease research

Here are a few things you might not know about ticks: One, they’re not insects. They’re closer to the spider in nature, making them arachnids. Also, they don’t fly, hop, jump or fall out of trees.

biomass

Scientists attack biomass power subsidy

Some of the most distinguished scientists in the US have written to UK energy secretary Ed Davey, urging him to abandon the government's "misguided" subsidies for companies burning wood pellets to generate electricity.

Schlesinger's finale

Scientists have been sounding the alarm for our planet for at least several decades, but perhaps no voice has been as consistent as that of Dr. William Schlesinger of the Cary Institute. On April 25, to a packed audience, Schlesinger gave his last Friday night talk before he retires in June.

Tick season is upon us

Video Report
Springtime is finally upon us again and as people head back outside to enjoy the outdoors they increase their chances of getting bit by a tick.

Ecology team improves understanding of valley-wide stream chemistry

A geostatistical approach for studying environmental conditions in stream networks and landscapes has been successfully applied at a valley-wide scale to assess headwater stream chemistry at high resolution, revealing unexpected patterns in natural chemical components.

Choose a summer camp

Warmer weather is finally here, and for many parents and their children, this means the time to choose a summer camp is fast approaching. The Hudson Valley has a large selection of camps, from day camps to sleep-away camps, covering everything from theater to farming.

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