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opossum

Opossums - killers of ticks

At night, when you catch sight of an opossum in your car headlights, you are allowed to think, "That is one ugly little animal."

hudson river

How's the water? Quality issues arise for local creeks

At the Watershed Roundtable, held at SUNY New Paltz, some disturbing evidence was presented regarding pollution of both the Wallkill River and the Rondout Creek.

white-footed mouse

Study says mice are super hosts of Lyme ticks

While bloodsucking ticks can lay waste to a moose and infect humans with devastating diseases, the tiny parasites and the bacteria they carry have no apparent effect on one wee woodland creature: the white-footed mouse.

Aedes aegypti

As climate change alters ecosystems, scientists worry that exotic diseases will spread

Another public health challenge the National Climate Assessment will explore is the likelihood that diseases native to other geographical areas will migrate to the United States as climate changes alter ecosystems.

mouse tagged

Ticks don't harm mice, study finds, meaning Lyme threat is not decreased

When researchers at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies began a recent study, they wanted to know the answer to a simple question: What effect do ticks have on the health of mice?

Soil in spring

It's March. But the hard crust of snow on the ground is hanging around -- it's been too cold for it to go. A few days before spring, and the world still looks mostly frozen.

Saline solution: When de-icing roads, we may want to pass on the salt

It's no secret that Americans love salt. But our uses for it extend well beyond the kitchen: It turns out we dump so much of the stuff on our roads that a lot of it ends up in our freshwater rivers and streams. Thanks again polar vortex.

Breaking the transmission cycle of Lyme disease

What if we could vaccinate the white-footed mice that account for the majority of the transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi (the cause of Lyme disease) and significantly reduce the level of tick infection?

How the spreading symptoms of climate change can be deadly

The hallmarks of a warming climate, heavier rains, more severe droughts, rising sea levels and longer growing seasons, are spreading a variety of pathogens throughout the world.

Africa: Freshwater atlas to help nations conserve biodiversity

An online repository of maps has been launched to make information on freshwater biodiversity available on a common platform for use by scientists, policymakers, conservationists and NGOs.

Why pickle brine is a secret weapon against ice

This extremely icy and snowy winter has brought renewed attention to the question: What's the best (and most environmentally kind) way to melt it all? Salt, chemicals ... or pickle brine?

Lyme disease: Freezes may reduce ticks

A 2012 study co-authored by Cary Disease Ecologist Rick Ostfeld examined the probability of tick mortality in winter conditions in Millbrook and Syracuse.

Study questions link between increases in Lyme disease and deer

We often blame white-tailed deer and the deer ticks they carry for spreading Lyme disease in the United States, especially from Minnesota to New England to Northern Virginia.

"Antibacterial" soaps don't work, are bad for humans & the environment

On December 16, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a proposed rule that allows soap and hygiene product manufacturers one year to prove "antibacterial" additives are safe and effective.

Dengue fever: Another formidable World Cup opponent

Brazil is a hot spot for dengue fever, a mosquito-transmitted virus that lacks a vaccine or treatment. The nation's 573 dengue deaths in 2013 through Nov. 20 is nearly double the 2012 toll.

Diseases on the move because of climate change

Warming temperatures and increased extreme weather events such as drought, rainstorms and flooding, contribute to the nation's changing disease map, experts say. USA Today reports on this trend and how it has impacted the spread of various diseases including tick-borne illnesses.

On the beech

In Ballard Park in Ridgefield, there are some lovely, thick-trunked, big-canopied beech trees, perfect for providing shade on a summer's day. They are old trees and despite their beauty, they're not healthy. They have beech bark disease.

The human health costs of losing natural systems

A new paper from members of the HEAL (Health & Ecosystems: Analysis of Linkages) consortium delineates a new branch of environmental health that focuses on the public health risks of human-caused changes to Earth’s natural systems.

Trees and lawn victims of Asian worm invasion

The Register-Star reports on one woman's experience of the destructive effect of an invasive earthworm on the health of her surrounding forest.

Real-Time Hudson River data Is displayed on Walkway Over The Hudson

A pedestrian bridge in New York has a new sign unveiled this week featuring real-time data about the Hudson River. Officials say the information will provide some useful facts to visitors while scientists monitor the river’s changing conditions.

Walkway sign monitors river in real time, keeps visitors informed

Environmentalists often lament that the things they seek to protect can't speak for themselves. But for the Hudson River, that's not true anymore.

Super-bacteria breeding in city streams

A recent study found antibiotic-resistant bacteria flourishing in Chicago's urban creeks and rivers at more than double the rates of woodland waterways.

The global search for education: Prevention - ticks

Given the 300,000 new cases of Lyme disease a year in the US reported by the CDC, it is understandable that health organizations and local governments in this country are extremely anxious to develop a broader, more effective tick-borne diseases control strategy.

Cary scientists study simulated streams

In a converted greenhouse off of Route 82, scientists at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies are planning to contaminate streams.Fortunately, those streams are in 20 fiberglass tubs at the institute's new Artificial Stream Facility.

'Rivers on Rolaids': How acid rain is changing waterways

Something peculiar is happening to rivers and streams in large parts of the United States — the water's chemistry is changing. Scientists have found dozens of waterways that are becoming more alkaline.

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