Newsroom

Calculating the true cost of a ton of mountaintop coal

To meet current U.S. coal demand through surface mining, an area of the Central Appalachians the size of Washington, D.C., would need to be mined every 81 days.

50 years after its discovery, acid rain has lessons for climate change

In the 1980s, the dying red spruce trees of New England—many of them taller than eight-story buildings and more than three centuries old—furnished frightening proof of the power of acid rain.

Researchers find acid rain legacy impacts Eastern waters

Podcast
WAMC reports on the long-term impacts of acid rain.

More tickborne diseases other than Lyme. Maybe just don’t go outside.

Some tick-borne diseases are just becoming known and thus are often not recognized by physicians.

CDC study focuses on spraying pesticides and tick-borne diseases

Podcast
A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looks at whether spraying yards with pesticides reduces the risk of contracting a tick-borne disease.

Teens get involved with nature

Michael Meaden is a hands-on, outdoor teen. As a youngster, he enjoyed outdoor youth camps at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook. But then the 14-year-old outgrew the camps. Fortunately, last year a new teen program was added to the youth camps: Eco-Investigator, for rising eighth- through 10th-graders.

Why does your yard look the same as every other yard?

Since 2011, scientists have been exploring people’s yards in six U.S. metropolitan areas–Los Angeles, Phoenix, Boston, Miami, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and Baltimore.

Climate change affects disease spread: The need to forecast

As our climate shifts and changes, wildlife and weather also shifts and changes. Now, researchers have found something else that's deviating from the norm.

Tick-borne virus risk increases

While extremely rare, Powassan virus is deadlier than other tick-borne illnesses — killing 30 percent of those infected statewide since 2004 — and its victims are infected much more quickly.

veery

Veeries very quiet when owls are about

Cary visiting scientist Ken Schmidt and his research team have been studying the ecology and behavior of birds on the Cary Institute grounds since 1998.

west nile

West Nile virus scant in mosquitoes in Allegheny County this summer

Mosquitoes testing positive for West Nile virus in Pennsylvania are very low in sharp contrast with the numbers recorded in 2012.

Study finds ticks linked to Encephalitis in NYS

A recent study shows a link between a certain type of tick and a rare illness. The report shows the virus is on the rise in parts of the Hudson Valley and has spread to the Capital District.

Cary Institute, other experts aim to help public comprehend science

Understanding the natural world is important — especially to scientists. But they'll be the first to say: Science is not the easiest subject to explain.

Wired forest may reveal how New England forests respond to climate change

Monitoring a forest in New Hampshire provides clues to how important trees, such as maples, respond to changed conditions due to global warming.

The Lyme Wars

The New Yorker reports on the controversy surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease. Columnist Michael Specter interviewed Cary disease ecologist Richard Ostfeld about the ecology of ticks and the spread of the disease.

Zebra Mussels and the Hudson River

In the Housatonic River, zebra mussels -- non-native bivalves that can move into a water body and just dominate it -- were found in 2009 in Massachusetts and in 2010 in Connecticut at Lake Lillinonah and Lake Zoar.

West Nile virus proliferation stumps experts

Health officials and researchers are scratching their heads, wondering whether there will be a repeat this summer of last year's spike in the West Nile virus, a potentially fatal illness that mosquitoes transmit.

Policymakers briefed on water resources

Cary scientists David Strayer and Emma Rosi-Marshall delivered expert testimony at a May 5, 2013 congressional briefing that highlighted problems with aquatic invasive species and “natural infrastructure” solutions. The briefing took place on Capitol Hill as the U.S. Senate debated the Water Resources Development Act.

Flooding forum at Cary says work with nature

The havoc wrought by hurricanes Sandy and Irene heightened awareness of the impacts of flooding. The Millbrook Independent reports on a flood-management forum hosted by Cary on May 4, 2013.

Gibson: Lyme disease a major health problem

Richard S. Ostfeld,  a disease ecologist specializing in Lyme disease and West Nile Virus, said while "large advances have been made even with rather paltry funding," there needs to be "rapid improvements," such as better diagnostics for early-stage Lyme.

Climate change and dead fish: Think global, act local

Many of us eagerly anticipate summer, when fishing, boating and swimming can happen at a favorite lake. This year, though, there may also be a bit of trepidation —  what lies ahead for Lake Auburn? Will we see another fish kill?

Flushed drugs may threaten stream ecologies

Most streams that flow near cities and towns are laced with drugs that escape from sewage treatment plants or pharmaceutical factories.

Pharmaceutical pollution wreaking havoc on aquatic wildlife in freshwater streams

There has been a lot of concern over the possibility of pharmaceuticals ending up in freshwater and disrupting populations of wildlife. Now, new research shows that these concerns may be completely legitimate

Why I count glass eels

Former Cary writer-in-residence Akiko Busch writes about modern citizen science endeavors and how individuals are getting involved by helping to gather data about the environment.

Decreased water flow may be trade-off for more productive forest

Bubbling brooks and streams are a scenic and much loved feature of forest ecosystems, but long-term data at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest suggests that more productive forests might carry considerably less water.

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