Newsroom

Crangling in Land O' Lakes makes for a shocking summer

REU student Alberto Salazar gives us a taste of his experience working with Cary scientists Dr. Chris Solomon and Alex Ross on two fisheries projects based in northern Wisconsin.

The moss is always greener on the science side

REU student Olivia Vought tells us about her journey to Cary & summer plans to survey streambed moss

Hudson Data Jam participants

Students delve into data and get creative to tell science stories about the Hudson Valley

Sixth annual Hudson Data Jam Awards Expo features creative work by regional students

Mild Winter Days? Watch Out for Ticks

Although tick encounters are less frequent in winter, there are still plenty of ticks out in the environment searching for a blood meal.

surveying fish Camp Lake

Angling for sustainable fisheries

We all know what a landscape is, but have you ever heard of a FishScape? 'Fishscapes' are lake-rich regions where recreational fishing opportunities are plentiful and interactions among anglers, regulatory institutions, and local economies influence fishery health.

Ecosystem ecologist Kathleen Weathers

Kathleen Weathers to serve as President of the Ecological Society of America

Cary Senior Scientist to head the world’s largest community of ecologists

Tim Hoellein: In Conversation

Tim Hoellein is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biology at Loyola University, Chicago. He studies the effects of different forms of human-caused pollution on freshwater systems.

Evaluating the gas we pass

Ecologists are embracing the potential to increase the storage of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. This could reduce the build-up of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere. But does it?

Summer 2018 REU Spotlight

Cary Institute is home to one of the nation’s longest running Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) programs. Meet the 2018 summer cohort. 

Kishi Oyagi

Jammin’ on the Hudson

Hudson Valley students experiment with creative approaches to science storytelling in the 2018 Hudson Data Jam 

Communities can do more through 'Climate Smart' initiative

In 2009, the New York State Department of Conservation launched the Climate Smart Communities (CSC) program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and prepare New Yorkers for the effects of climate change.

Lake Sunapee

Landsat 8 as a tool for monitoring algal blooms

In a new study, researchers investigate how advances in remote sensing technology can be used to predict and monitor algal blooms before they turn harmful. Using satellites that detect chlorophyll, which is present in algae, they are developing ways to monitor water quality from outer space.

Mycorrhizae

Most folks don't realize it, but the roots of plants are connected underground by a vast network of fungi that improve the function of plant roots. The fungi exist in what is known as a symbiosis—both the fungus and the plant benefit. The fungus gets its energy from the plant, and the plant gains access to soil nutrients by the action of the fungus.

8 facts about the ecology of Lyme

Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. In the Northeast, the blacklegged ticks that spread Lyme disease are increasing their range, putting more people in harm’s way. 

Lyme Disease

Climate change and warming temperatures are broadening the range of suitable tick habitat. As ticks move north, they're bringing Lyme and other diseases with them. As ticks are beginning to emerge, it is time to heighten vigilance; check yourself, your children, and pets regularly.

Together we can get our freshwaters off drugs

Pharmaceuticals are found in surface waters around the world. These compounds evade wastewater treatment infrastructure, pollute drinking water, and impact aquatic ecosystems. Here are some steps you can take to help stem the tide of pharmaceutical pollution.

Urban Plant Diversity

It's spring and a young man's fancy may turn to.......gardening. Of course, it is tempting to find ornamental plants that no one else has in the neighborhood, so a significant fraction of the nursery trade focuses on exotics—species that do not occur locally.

air pollution

Particulate Pollution

Increasingly we recognize the impacts of small airborne particles on our health. Breathing particles less than 2.5 microns in diameter, known as PM2.5, is estimated to cause more than 3 million deaths per year worldwide.

wood pellets

Are wood pellets a green fuel?

James Watt's steam engine vaulted coal to its major role as a fuel for the Industrial Revolution. In more recent years, about 40 percent of the world's electricity has been generated in coal-fired power plants, consuming more than 80 percent of the coal mined each year.

Long Lake, MI

Carbon and cannibalism: What happens to bass when you increase the amount of decomposing plant debris in an experimental lake

Lakes across the northern hemisphere are getting darker; causes include heavier rains, changes in land use patterns, and recovery from acid rain. Cary Institute ecologist Chris Solomon is working to advance understanding of how lake browning impacts fishery productivity. Recent work explores the role of phantom midges and bass cannibalism in this complex system.

redwing

Phenology

The science of phenology is now advancing with the lengthening record of the Earth's greenness, snowcover and temperature from satellites and other sensors.

plastic on beach

Microplastics

With some 300 million tons of plastic products produced annually, it is not surprising that plastic is ubiquitous debris in the environment. Plastic bags hang in the trees in New York City and blow across the barren lands of the Mojave desert.

windmill

Renewable futures

I had to chuckle over the recent Wall Street Journal report that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) had rejected Trump's plans to subsidize the coal and nuclear power industries—to prop them up as a campaign promise. The agency is mainly composed of Trump's own appointees. So sad.

solar panels

An experiment with clean air

As we hear pressures to roll back some of the provisions that ensure clean air, largely in pursuit of unfettered economic activity, it is worth spending a little time reflecting on the benefits of clean air to human health. A long list of gases that exacerbate asthma, emphysema, and COP, such as ozone and nitric oxide, are known irritants and oxidizers of lung tissue. 

North America's Lakes are getting saltier

North America’s freshwater lakes are getting saltier. The culprits: development and road salt. So reports an extensive study of 371 lakes conducted by a team of researchers in the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) Graduate Student Fellowship Program, an initiative led by Cary Institute scientist Kathleen Weathers. 

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